William III (Albini) d'Aubigny

William (Albini) d'Aubigny (abt. 1146 - 1236)

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William (William III) "Lord of Belvoir" d'Aubigny formerly Albini
Born about in Leicestershire, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married 1192 [location unknown]
Husband of — married about 29 Sep 1198 [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Offington, Englandmap
Profile last modified 17 Sep 2019 | Created 5 Sep 2014 | Last significant change: 17 Sep 2019
09:04: Andrew Lancaster edited the Biography and Preferred Name for William (Albini) d'Aubigny (abt.1146-1236). [Thank Andrew for this | 1 thank-you received]
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Magna Carta Surety Baron
William III d'Aubigny was one of the twenty-five medieval barons who were surety for Magna Carta in 1215.
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Contents

Biography

"William d’Albini (d'Aubigny) was a relative latecomer to the baronial opposition cause, but one of the movement’s ablest military commanders and the leader of the defence of Rochester against King John in 1215. After John’s son, Henry III, succeeded to the throne in 1216, he showed himself a loyal supporter of the new regime.

"William (after 1146–1236) was the son of William d'Albini II by his wife Maud de Senlis, daughter of Robert de Clare, the grandson of another William, known as 'Brito', and the eventual heir of the first post-Conquest lord of Belvoir, Robert de Todeni. William’s lordship was an extensive one comprising some 33 knights' fees, stretching across much of the east and north Midlands, and partly overlooked by Belvoir (Leics.) itself, dramatically sited on a ridge west of Grantham.

"William was a minor at the time that his father died in 1167 or 1168 and appears to have come of age in about 1172. He witnessed charters of Henry II in England and Normandy, and from 1190 to 1193 served as constable of the castle of the Peak. For his support of King Richard against the rebellion of the king’s brother John, he was rewarded with part of the estate confiscated from the rebel, Roger de Montbegon. In 1194 he travelled to Speyer in Germany, to greet Richard on his release from captivity. Like a number of the Twenty Five, in John’s reign he embarked on the road to rebellion only reluctantly, being by upbringing and instinct a natural royalist. He had long experience of serving in royal administration locally. He served as sheriff of Rutland from 1195 to 1198, as sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire from 1196 to 1198, and as sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire in John’s first year. In the 1190s and later, he acted as an itinerant royal justice and in 1211-12 he was appointed keeper of the ports in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire. In February 1213, as John’s suspicions of the northern lords deepened, he served as a commissioner to look into money allegedly collected by sheriffs and other officials that never found its way into the royal coffers. His kinship to a number of the northern lords may have been a factor in his appointment.

"For all his involvement with royal government under John, however, William was not entirely uncritical of the king’s policies. In 1201 he was party to a baronial confederation objecting to military service in Normandy on the grounds that it was contrary to their terms of tenure. In 1215 William threw his weight behind the baronial opposition shortly after the barons’ takeover of London in May, doing so for several reasons. Almost certainly he had grown disenchanted with the oppressive nature of John’s rule. Five years before, he had been a witness to John’s official account of the reasons for his destruction of the Braose family, thereby associating himself with the king’s actions, while at the same time becoming aware of their arbitrariness. Secondly, he is almost certain to have been influenced by the ties of kinship. He was the first cousin of Robert FitzWalter, lord of Dunmow, to all intents and purposes the leader of the rebellion, and was the uncle of another rebel, Robert de Ros, the lord of Helmsley. It may also be significant that among his knightly tenants was Nicholas de Stuteville of Knaresborough, the greatest baronial debtor to the king of all.

"In June 1215 his experience and social standing ensured his appointment to the Twenty Five and from the autumn, after the renewal of war, he fought actively on the baronial side. In July, after the barons had gone their separate ways, Robert FitzWalter was writing to him to advise of a change of meeting-place for a tournament from Stamford to Hounslow Heath. John’s strategy in the civil war was to counter the baronial challenge by bringing in a force of mainly Flemish mercenaries to help re-take London. The barons, to prevent these men’s passage inland from Dover, made for Rochester, at the bridging point over the Medway, and quickly took the castle, installing William as constable. John retaliated by immediately embarking on siege operations. The castle, though ill-provisioned, was well manned, with some 95 knights and 45 men-at-arms under William’s command, and strong resistance was offered. Both sides fought fiercely. 'Living memory does not recall a siege so closely pressed or so bravely resisted', wrote the Barnwell chronicler. To eke out the meagre food rations in the castle, d’Albini ordered the sick and the wounded to be ejected, a common tactic in medieval sieges; according to the Barnwell writer again, the king had their hands and feet cut off. The turning-point in the siege came in November, when the king’s men successfully undermined one of the keep’s corner towers, bringing it down, and opening a way in. William had no alternative but to surrender, and he and his garrison were despatched to captivity at Corfe in Dorset.

"Following this success, the king made his way to the Midlands, where he directed the siege of William’s castle at Belvoir. After he had issued a threat to starve William himself if the garrison held out, the latter’s son Nicholas, who was heading the defence, hastily offered his surrender. In July 1216, partly through the good offices of his wife, William agreed [on] terms with the king, offering a ransom of 6000 marks. He had handed over 1000 marks of this sum by November when, shortly after the accession of the new king, Henry III, he was released, his wife offering herself as a hostage instead. In 1223 William was permitted to pay off the balance of the ransom in easy instalments of 40 marks a year. William’s career from 1217 was that of a committed supporter of the new Minority regime. He fought on the Regent’s side at Lincoln, and his loyalty was to earn its reward in his appointment as constable of Sleaford Castle (Lincs.). In 1223 he joined the young Henry III on his campaign against Prince Llewellyn and the Welsh at Builth Wells and Montgomery. Two years after this, he was one of the group of counsellors who witnessed the final and definitive reissue of Magna Carta and the Charter of the Forest.

"William died on 1 May 1236 at his manor of Uffington, near Stamford (Lincs.). His remains were interred in the priory which he had founded at Newstead, just outside the village; his heart, however, was removed for separate burial at Belvoir Priory. Between 1221 and the early 1230s the future chronicler, Roger Wendover, was prior of Belvoir, a dependent house of St Albans. It seems very likely that he was indebted to d’Albini for his account of the siege of Rochester, which is full of circumstantial detail.

"William was twice married. His first wife was Margery, daughter of Odinel de Umfreville of Prudhoe (Northumberland), who died sometime before 1198, and his second, Agatha, daughter and eventual coheiress of William Trussebut of Hunsingore (Yorks.). William’s heir was yet another William, who died in 1247 leaving only daughters, one of whom, Isabel, married Robert de Ros (d. 1285) of Helmsley, descendant of the lord of that name who was of the Twenty Five, so carrying the d’Albini inheritance to the Ros family.

"The family of d’Albini of Belvoir is not to be confused with that of the same name based at Old Buckenham (Norfolk) and Arundel (Sussex), which held the title of earl of Arundel."

~ Biography courtesy of Professor Nigel Saul and the Magna Carta 800th Anniversary Committee

Parents

William was the son and heir of William d’Aubeney (spelled variously d'Aubigne and sometimes referred to as William d'Aubigné Meschin) by his wife Maud FitzRobert (aka Maud de Senlis). He was a minor when he succeeded his father in 1168.[1]

Marriages and Children

He married (1st) Margaret (or Margery) de Umfreville, daughter of Odinel de Umfreville, of Prudhoe, Northumberland, by Alice, daughter of Richard de Lucy, Knt., of Chipping Ongar, Essex, Chief Justiciar of England. They had four sons, William, Odinel, Robert, and Nicholas (clerk) [Rector of Bottesford, Lincolnshire].[1]
He married (2nd) about 29 Sept. 1198 Agatha Trussebut, widow of Hamo Fitz Hamo (died 1196/7), of Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, and daughter of William Trussebut, of Warter in Holderness, East Riding, Baron of Hunsingore, Yorkshire, by his wife, Aubrey de Harcourt. They had no issue.[1]

Death and Burial

William died on 1 May 1236 at his manor of Uffington, near Stamford (Lincolnshire). His remains were interred in the priory which he had founded at Newstead, just outside the village; his heart, however, was removed for separate burial at Belvoir Priory (Leicestershire) under the wall opposite the high altar.

Notes

"On 15 Jan. 1200 King John confirmed to him the grant of the manor of Orston, Nottinghamshire, which he had received earlier from King Richard I. In 1200/1 he had license from the king to enclose his park at Stoke Albany and to hunt fox and hare in the royal forests. He fought in Ireland in 1210, and in 1215 became a Magna Carta Surety. He was appointed by the Barons Governor of Rochester Castle, but was compelled to surrender it to the King on 30 Nov. 1215, and was imprisoned in Corfe Castle. In December and the ensuing months, his wife, Agatha, and on some occasions, his son William, had letters of safe conduct for coming to the king to speak for his deliverance. On 6 August 1216 seisin of all his lands was given to his wife for the payment of 6,000 marks, for which he made a fine with the king. In the period July to October 1216, she made several payments amounting to upwards of 1,000 marks for his redemption and his knights and tenants had orders to make an aid for the purpose. On 23 March 1216/7, and again on 29 May 1217, orders were issued for the delivery of Agatha to her husband, satisfactory arrangements being made for hostages in her place. He was subsequently restored by King Henry III. He founded the hospital of Newstead by Stamford, Lincolnshire."[1]
Following is quoted from Medieval Lands (will be trimmed and summarized later):
WILLIAM [III] de Albini Brito, son of WILLIAM [II] de Albini Brito & his wife Matilda de Senlis (-before 15 May 1236). The Rotuli de Dominabus of 1185 records "Matillis de Sainlis que fuit filia Roberti filii Ricardi et mater Willelmi de Albineio" and "terra sua in Hungertone et in Winewelle"[1735]. "Willielmus de Albineio" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, with the consent of "Willielmi filii et hæredis mei et Matildis uxoris meæ et Ceciliæ matris meæ, necnon et Radulphi de Albinei fratris mei", by undated charter[1736]. "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis".

m firstly MARGERY, daughter of ODINEL [II] de Prudhoe & his wife ---. "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis". The primary source which confirms her parentage has not yet been identified. The name of her father suggests a family relationship with the Umfraville, later Earls of Angus.

m secondly (after [1196/98]) as her second husband, AGATHA Trussebut, widow of HAIMO de Wolverton, daughter of WILLIAM [II] Trussebut & his wife Albereda d´Harcourt (-1247). A manuscript history of the foundation of Barwell Priory names “quatuor sorores…Pagani filias…primogenita Mathildis de Doure…Alicia…Roisia…Ascelina” as the heiresses of “Gul. Peverell filius Pagani”, adding that Rohese was mother of “Albreda de Harecourt”, mother of “Galfridus Trussebut…et tres sorores…Roysia, Hillaria et Agatha”. The Liber Memorandorum Ecclesie de Bernewelle records that "Albreda de Harecurt" was mother of three sisters "Roysia, Hyllaria et Agatha". "Willielmus de Albiniaco tertius" donated "ecclesiam de Redmelina" to Belvoir monastery, Lincolnshire, for the souls of "Agayjæ uxoris meæ et…Margeriæ quondam uxoris meæ", by undated charter witnessed by "Willielmo de Albineio quarto, Odinello, Roberto et Nicholao filiis meis". “William of Belvoir” made a fine for relief of lands formerly of “William d´Aubigny his father”, saving to “Agatha, who was the wife of the same William, her rightful dower”, dated 15 May 1236.

Children

William [III] & his first wife had four children:

1. WILLIAM [IV] de Albini Brito (-before 14 Sep 1242); married Isabel ---- and had a daughter Isabell who married ([5 Jun 1243/17 May 1244]) ROBERT de Ros, son of WILLIAM de Ros & his wife Lucy --- (-17 May 1285, bur Kirkham).

2. ODINEL de Albini Brito .

3. ROBERT de Albini Brito .

4. NICHOLAS de Albini Brito .

Research Notes

The previous arms shown on this page were "the lion ... used by the d'Aubignys of Arundel, including the 'Illustrious Man'. Sources differ on the correct arms for d'Aubigny of Belvoir." The arms on the page as of August 11, 2015 are those shown for this William d'Aubeney in Richardson's Magna Carta Ancestry.

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, by Douglas Richardson & Kimball G. Everingham, publ. 2005
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013), Vol IV, p. 11 (wife's lineage); Vol II pp 393-396
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, Royal Ancestry series, 2nd edition, 4 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2011), Vol 1, pp 69-72
  • Wikipedia: William d'Aubigny (rebel)
  • William d'Aubeney, "Our Royal, Titled, Noble, and Commoner Ancestors and Cousins" (website, compiled by Mr. Marlyn Lewis, Portland, OR; accessed August 11, 2015): note: Lewis database has death date as May 7, 1236
  • The Free Dictionary
  • Cawley, Charles. "Medieval Lands": A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families © by Charles Cawley, hosted by Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (FMG). See also WikiTree's source page for MedLands.

Acknowledgements

This page has been edited according to Style Standards adopted by January 2014. Click the Changes tab to see edits to this profile; from that list, click WikiTree IDs other than Albini-39 to see changes to those profiles prior to being merged.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to this profile.

Magna Carta Project

As a surety baron, William III d'Aubigny's profile is managed by the Magna Carta Project. See Albini-39 Descendants for profiles of his descendants that have been improved and categorized by the Magna Carta project and are in a project-approved trail to a Gateway Ancestor. See this index for links to other surety barons and category pages for their descendants. See the project's Base Camp for more information about Magna Carta trails.
  • Needs Re-review: Appears an update in progress was never completed. Preference for re-doing is to keep the Professor's article and add a section on genealogical vital stats with inline citations (see, for examples, Clare-651 and Clare-673). ~ Noland-165 16:59, 9 April 2019 (UTC)




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William d'Aubigné coat of arms
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Collaboration

On 11 Sep 2019 at 19:43 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

On 11 Sep 2019 at 13:47 GMT Richard Hellstrom wrote:

The relationship finder ???? Says William is the 26th great grandfather of Hellstrom-259 but who aren't the Traylor's related to ?

On 22 Apr 2019 at 22:25 GMT Anonymous (Holland) Carroll wrote:

Source: Douglas Richardson. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham (Salt Lake City: the author, 2013), volume II, page 393 DAUBENEY 6.

William D'Aubeney, married (1st) Margaret (or Margery) De Umfreville, daughter of Odinel de Umfreville, by Alice, daughter of Richard de Lucy. They had four sons, William, Odinel, Robert, and Nicholas [Rector]. His wife, Margaret, died 20 September, year unknown. He married (2nd) about 29 Sept. 1198 Agatha Trussebut. They had no issue.

Children of William d'Aubeney, by Margaret de Umfreville:

i. William D'Aubeney. He married (1st) Aubrey Biset. They had no issue. He married (2nd) Isabel ___. They had one daughter, Isabel.
ii. Odinel D'Aubeney. He married Hawise ____.
iii. Robert D'aubeney. He married Eustache ____.
iv. Nicholas D'Aubeney, [Rector].

Thank you!

On 22 Apr 2019 at 21:35 GMT Anonymous (Holland) Carroll wrote:

Source: Douglas Richardson. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham (Salt Lake City: the author, 2013), volume II, page 393 DAUBENEY 5.

Maud De Senlis, born about 1125. She married (1st) William D'Aubeney (or D'Aubeny, De Albeney), son and heir of William D'Aubeney, by Cecily, daughter of Roger Bigod. They had one son, William, and one daughter, Maud. William D'Aubeney died in 1167. His widow, Maud, married (2nd) in or after 1180 (as his 2nd) wife) Richard De Luvetot.

Thank you!




William III is 28 degrees from Tanya Lowry, 21 degrees from Charles Tiffany and 12 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.