John Alden

John Alden (abt. 1598 - 1687)

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John Alden
Born about in Harwich, Essex, Englandmap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married about in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony (Massachusetts)map
Descendants descendants
Died in Duxbury, Plymouth Colonymap
Profile last modified | Created 21 Sep 2010
This page has been accessed 26,820 times.

Categories: Mayflower Passengers | US President Direct Ancestor | Massachusetts Bay Colonists | Mayflower Family Member | Mayflower Compact signatories | New Plimoth | Duxbury, Massachusetts | Myles Standish Burying Ground, Duxbury, Massachusetts.

The Mayflower.
John Alden was a passenger on the Mayflower.
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U.S. President Direct Ancestor
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Contents

Biography

Name: John Alden
Birth date: 1598 or 1599 (uncertain)
Birth place: Southampton or Harwich, Essex, England (uncertain; poss. Harwich, Essex according to Caleb Johnson's Mayflower History).[1][2]
Parents: (uncertain)[3]
Death date: 12 Sep 1687[1][3]
Death place: Duxbury, Plymouth, Massachusetts[1][3]
Residence date: 1620
Residence place: Plymouth (later Duxbury), Massachusetts
Marriage: John Alden married Priscilla Mullins at Plymouth about 1622.
CHILDREN of John and Priscilla Alden: Elizabeth, John, Jr., Joseph, Sarah, Priscilla, Jonathan, Ruth, Mary, Rebecca, and David. William Pabodie was the husband of their daughter Elizabeth.

Narrative 1 A popular myth states John Alden is considered to be the first passenger of the famous passenger ship The Mayflower to have set foot on Plymouth Rock in 1620.[4] He was one of the founders of the Plymouth Colony and the seventh, and last living, signer of the Mayflower Compact. Alden probably has the largest number of descendants of the Mayflower Passengers.

Alden was renowned for his practical leadership and integrity. He held a commanding presence over other members of the colony. Though he eventually held several distinguished positions he started his career as a laborer.

Alden was a carpenter who was hired to be the cooper for The Mayflower, which was docked in Southampton, England. Over the years Alden became the Governor's Assistant, the Duxbury Deputy to the General Court of Plymouth, a member under arms of Captain Miles Standish's Duxbury Company, a member of the Council of War, the Treasurer of Plymouth Colony and eventually Commissioner to Yarmouth (now in Maine).

John Alden was not a pilgrim and had no religious motives for leaving England as the other Pilgrims. While repairing The Mayflower, Alden decided he would follow along with the ship and try to find prosperity in the New World. However, he may have had some incentive from a young woman named Priscilla Mullins. Although, he wasn't the only one to fall for Mullins. Captain Miles Standish would come to have feelings for her during the long voyage to the New World. The love triangle would come to an end when John Alden finally married Priscilla Mullins about 1623.

In 1634, while serving as a member of the Plymouth Colony during a meeting with the Massachusetts Bay Colony members, Alden was jailed when a fight between the groups resulted in the death of one man. He was not involved in the fight, but was the highest ranking member of the group and took responsibility. He would later be released.

Alden became known for his later dislike of the Quakers who were settling Cape Cod.

John Alden died at Duxbury on 12 September 1687. Both he and his wife Priscilla lie buried, interestingly enough, in the Miles Standish Burial Ground. His memorial has a biography, pictures and links to those of many family members.[5]

Inscription:

NEAR HERE LYES BODY OF
MR. JOHN ALDEN
WHO DIED IN DUXBURY
SEPT 12, 1687 AGED NEAR 88 YRS.

The John Alden House was made into an historic building in 1904 to honor the memories of the original settlers.

Narrative 2 The seventh signer of the Mayflower Compact. In Plymouth Colony: "He was a surveyor of highways; a member of a committee for raising a force against the Indians; deputy from Duxbury from 1641 to 1649; a member of the Colony's council of war, 1646, 1653, 1658, and 1667; treasures, 1656-1658; Governor's Assistant, 1632-1641; and from 1650 to 1686. Twice he was deputy governor, 1664-1665, and in 1677." "reputedly a fine speaker and was interested in military affairs. Though not of the Leyden church, Alden was distinguished for practical wisdom, integrity, and decision, and early acquired and retained a commanding influence over his associates. In every position he occupied, he fulfilled his duties promptly and to the satisfaction of his employers." "He was probably one of the seven well persons left at one time to care for the sick and dying in that terrible first winter." Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and is a descendant of his in the eight generation. John Adams is also a descendant of his.

Narrative 3 John Alden appears to have originated from an Alden family residing in Harwich, Essex, England, that was related by marriage to the Mayflower's master Christopher Jones. He was about 21 years old when he was hired to be the cooper, or barrel-maker, for the Mayflower's voyage to America. He was given the option to stay in America, or return to England; he decided to stay.

At Plymouth, he quickly rose up from his common seaman status to a prominent member of the Colony. About 1622 or 1623, he married Priscilla, the orphaned daughter of William and Alice Mullins. They had their first child, Elizabeth, around 1624, and would have nine more children over the next twenty years. John Alden was one of the earliest freemen in the Colony, and was elected an assistant to the governor and Plymouth Court as early as 1631, and was regularly re-elected throughout the 1630s. He also became involved in administering the trading activities of the Colony on the Kennebec River, and in 1634 witnessed a trading dispute escalate into a double-killing, as Moses Talbot of Plymouth Colony was shot at point-blank range by trespasser John Hocking, who was then shot and killed when other Plymouth men returned fire. John Alden was held in custody by the neighboring Massachusetts Bay Colony for a few days while the two colonies debated who had jurisdiction to investigate the murders. Myles Standish eventually came to the Bay Colony to provide Plymouth's answer in the matter.

Alden, and several other families, including the Standish family, founded the town of Duxbury in the 1630s and took up residence there. Alden served as Duxbury's deputy to the Plymouth Court throughout the 1640s, and served on several committees, including the Committee on Kennebec Trade, and sat on several Councils of War. He also served as colony treasurer. In the 1650s, he build the house at left, in Duxbury, which still stands today. By the 1660s, Alden's frequent public service, combined with his large family of wife and ten children, began to cause his estate to languish, so the Plymouth Court provided him a number of land grants and cash grants to better provide for his family. Throughout the 1670s, Alden began distributing his land holdings to his surviving sons. He died in 1687 at the age of 89, one of the last surviving Mayflower passengers.

Additional Notes: The Aldens seem to be such a part of the American Myth. John has been described as a tall man, and one of the tallest of those at Plymouth. Some of his descendants also were very tall. Pricilla is supposed to have been "comely" or very pretty. They have a great many living descendants. When many of us think of the voyage of the Mayflower, the hardships of the early settlement at Plymouth, and the story of the first thanksgiving, we picture John and Priscilla Alden.

6-9-2015 Birthplace might have been Southampton, England. Mayflower passenger in 1620, 21 years old. He was a cooper. Moved to Duxbury, MA 1632. His house in Duxbury, MA may still be visited. Buried near Eagle Tree Pond, Duxbury, MA in the Myles Standish Burial Ground. Research: Pulled from Rootsweb.Ancestry.com See file in section O.S. Ancestry, CompuServe, by Jennifer Bates Nath, 72634, 1265, Stratton quoting from Bradford (Ford) 2/40. [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] Ancestral Summary: Extensive research has been done into the ancestry of John Alden, but nothing has conclusively been found. There are two major theories that have been presented over the years:

Charles Edward Banks, in his book, the English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers, 1929, [12] puts forward a theory that John is the son of George Alden and Jane— and grandson of Richard and Avys (Aoys) Alden of Southampton, England. Since Bradford says John Alden was hired in Southampton, this would be a logical place to start looking for Alden's. No other supporting evidence has been found, and it has been noted by many researchers that the names George, Richard, and Avys do not occur anywhere in John Alden's family. Naming children after parents and grandparents was an extremely common practice in the seventeenth century, and the absence of such a name is nearly enough evidence to disprove this theory.

The currently popular theory is that John Alden came from Harwich, Essex, England. There was a sea-faring Alden family living there, who were related by marriage to Christopher Jones, captain of the Mayflower. It has ben suggested John Alden may be the son of John Alden and Elizabeth Daye, but this is not fully proven either.

William Bradford wrote, in his history Of Plymouth Plantation: "John was hired for a cooper (barrel maker) at Southampton where the ship (Mayflower) victualed, and being a hopeful young man was much desired but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed and married here." and Bradford later wrote, "John Alden married Priscilla, Mr. Mullin's daughter, and had issue by her as is before related."

John Alden was assistant for the Plymouth colony for many years, and was deputy governor for two years. His marriage to Priscilla Mullins was the subject of the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow poem, "The Courtship of Myles Standish," which although a classic has little factual basis. John and Priscilla were among the founders of the town of Duxbury.

In 1634, John Alden was on the Kennebec River assisting in the forceful removal of John Hocking who was illegally fishing and trading on land that had been granted to the Pilgrims. Hocking refused to leave, and when the party arrived at his ship by canoe to board and remove, he shot and killed Moses Talbot. In return, Hockings was shot and killed. The Massachusetts Bay Colony took matters into its own hands, and arrested John Alden (even though he was not the one who fired the shot). Myles Standish was sent by Governor Bradford to obtain Alden's release, which he successfully did.

In his later years, John Alden was on many juries, including a witch trial--though in Plymouth's case, the jury found the accuser guilty of libel and the alleged witch was allowed to go free. Plymouth Colony only had two witch trials during its history, and in both cases the accuser was found guilty and punished.

John and Priscilla Alden probably have the largest number of descendants of any Mayflower passenger, but with stiff competition from Richard Warren and John Howland. They are ancestors to Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Vice President Dan Quayle.

See notes on Priscilla Mullins.

Nothing is known for certain of his English background other than Bradford's words that Alden "was hired for a cooper, at South=Hampton, where the ship victuled, and being a hopeful young man, was much desired, but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here (Plymouth Colony; but he stayed and married here." [7]

John Alden was a crew member of the Mayflower hired at Southampton, England. He was employed as a cooper to look after the beer hogsheads (barrels). He remained in the colony instead of returning to England on the Mayflower probably because of the attractions of Priscilla Mullins, whom he may have known and courted before he joined the ship. [13]

The London merchants who financed the Pilgrims were losing money on their investment. The Pilgrims decided to buy out the merchants for fl,800 plus the merchants debts of f600. Plymouth Colony formed a joint-stock company. The Plymouth planters had no money to pay for the shares. Thus eight men, including Bradford and Alden, held themselves responsible for the debits of the Colony in exchange for a complete monopoly of the trade of the Colony and exclusive use of its boats. The source of profit would be trade with the Indians. This agreement was to last six years 1633 to 1639. At the end of six years the eight men still owed money. To pay off the last f400, John Alden and Miles Standish sold 300 acres of land. [14]

Alden, John (1599-1687), one of the Pilgrims, born in Southampton, England, went to America on the Mayflower in 1620 and was a signer of the Mayflower Compact. He was one of the founders of the first permanent English settlement in New England. In 1623 Alden married Priscilla Mullens (1604-85?), another Pilgrim. In 1627 or shortly afterward, together with the Plymouth colonist, Myles Standish, he founded Duxbury, where he lived until his death. Alden was active in the affairs of the Plymouth Colony, serving alternately as assistant to the governor and as deputy from Duxbury. He lived longer than any of the other signers of the Mayflower Compact.

Alden's fame rests chiefly on the romantic tale written by the American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, "The Courtship of Myles Standish" (1858). In the poem, Alden, deeply in love with Priscilla Mullens, proposes to her on behalf of his shy friend Standish, whereupon she inquires, "Why don't you speak for yourself, John?"[15]

5/5/20161"In 1660 the General Court noted that 'In regard that Mr Alden is low in his estate, and occationed (sic) to spend much time att (sic) the courts on the countreyes (sic) occations (sic) and soe (sic) hath done this many yeares (sic), the Court have alowed {sic} him a smale (sic) gratuity, the sume (sic) of ten pounds, to be payed (sic) by the Treasurer' (Pilgrim Church Records) 3:195)."[16]

John Alden died, intestate, at Duxbury 12 Sep 1687. Prior to his death John deeded land to his children. Administration of the estate of John Alden, lately deceased of Duxbury, was given to his son Lt. Jonathan Alden of 8 Nov 1687. The inventory taken 31 Oct 1687 is quite small and shows no land. He had a few animals, tools and household goods. The heirs, signed a release in favor of Jonathan Alden and acknowledged receipt of their shares in a document signed 13 Jun 1688, by Alexander Standish (Seal) in the right of his wife Sarah deceased, John Bass (Seal) in the right of his wife Ruth deceased, Mary Alden (seal), Thomas Dillano (seal), John Alden (Seal), Joseph Alden (Seal), David Alden (Seal), Prisilla Alden (Seal), William Paybody (seal)[17]

Children.[18]

  • Elizabeth b.c. 1624 m. William Pabodie
  • John b.c. 1626 m. Elizabeth (____) Everill
  • Joseph b. c. 1627 m. Mary Simonson
  • Priscilla b. say 1630; unm. in 1688
  • Jonathan Alden b. c. 1632 m. Abigail Hallett
  • Sarah Alden b. say 1634 m. Alexander Standish, son of Miles
  • Ruth Alden b. say 1636; m. John Bass
  • Mary Alden b. say 1638 ; unm in 1688
  • Rebecca Alden b. say 1640; m. Thomas Delano
  • David Alden b say 1642; m. Mary Southworth.

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Anderson, Robert Charles, "John Alden", The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vol. I, Boston, New England Historic Genealogical Society 1995
  2. Caleb Johnson's Mayflower History - John Alden
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Esther Littleford Woodworth-Barnes and Alicia Crane Williams, Mayflower Families through Five Generations, Vol. 16 Part 1 of 3, John Alden, Boston, Mass.: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2002, 1.
  4. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica. John Alden and Priscilla Alden. Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. October 15, 2008. : Accessed January 26, 2018.
  5. Find A Grave - John Alden, Sr : accessed 27 Jan 2018. Memorial page for John Alden, Sr (1598–1687), Find A Grave Memorial no. 15, citing Myles Standish Burying Ground, Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; the accompanying photographs by williamknight57 and Jenory are materially informative and provide a legible image of the inscribed data.
  6. Eugene Aubrey Stratton, FASG. Plymouth Colony Its History & People The Generations Network, Inc., Provo, Utah: Ancestry Publishing, 1986), 232-233, 331.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Charles Henry Pope, The pioneers of Massachusetts, a descriptive list, drawn from records of the colonies, towns and churches and other contemporaneous documents. (Boston: C.H. Pope, 1900), 12.
  8. Duxbury Records 974.42 D9800
  9. William Richard Cutter, Edward henry Clement, Samuel Hart, Mary Kingsbury Talcott, Frederick Bostwick, Ezra Scollay Stearns. joint editors. Genealogical and family history of the state of Connecticut; a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation. 4 vols. (New York: Lewis historical publishing company, 1911). 1:370-72, 2:1134, 4:1746.
  10. George F. Willison, Saints and Strangers, (Cornwall, New York: The Cornwall Press, 1943) 407, 48.
  11. John T. Landis, Mayflower descendants and their marriages for two generations after the landing : including a short history of the church of the pilgrim founders of New England (Baltimore, Maryland: Southern Book Co., Baltimore, 1956).
  12. Charles Edward Banks, The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers, 1929.
  13. Charles M. Andrews, The Colonial Period of American History The Settlement Volume 1, (Conn.: Yale University Press), 270.
  14. Andrews, The Colonial Period of American History The Settlement 269.
  15. Andrews, The Colonial Period of American History The Settlement p?
  16. Stratton, FASG, Plymouth Colony Its History & People 233.
  17. Bowman, George Ernest. "John Aldens' Inventory and the Settlement of His Estate." The Mayflower Descendant 3:10, 11. Cites Plymouth County Probate Records, Volume I pages 10 & 16
  18. Anderson, Robert Charles. The Pilgrim Migration: Immigrants to Plymouth Colony 1620-1633. (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2004).pp 7-8


See also:

  • Alden, Ebenezer. Memorial of the Descendants of the Hon. John Alden Randolph, Mass.: Samuel P. Brown, 1867. 164 pages. (Archive.org : accessed 24 Aug 2016).
  • Anderson, Robert Charles. "John Alden," The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vol.1. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995. p.21-26.
  • Anderson, Robert C. The Pilgrim Migration: Immigrants to Plymouth Colony, 1620-1633. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2004.
  • Andrews, Charles M., The Colonial Period of American History The Settlement Volume 1, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Banks, Charles Edward. The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1976.
  • Bradford's History "Of Plymouth Plantation," Boston: Wright & Porter Printing Company, 1898.
  • Cutter, William Richard, Edward henry Clement, Samuel Hart, Mary Kingsbury Talcott, Frederick Bostwick, Ezra Scollay Stearns. joint editors. Genealogical and family history of the state of Connecticut; a record of the achievements of her people in the making of a commonwealth and the founding of a nation. 4 volumes. New York: Lewis historical publishing company, 1911. (Archive.org : accessed 24 Aug 2016).
  • Find A Grave, database and images Find A Grave - John Alden, Sr : accessed 27 Jan 2018. Memorial page for John Alden, Sr (1598–1687), Find A Grave Memorial no. 15, citing Myles Standish Burying Ground, Duxbury, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; the accompanying photographs by williamknight57 and Jenory are materially informative and provide a legible image of the inscribed data.
  • Landis, John T. Mayflower descendents and their marriages for two generations after the landing : including a short history of the church of the pilgrim founders of New England, Baltimore, Maryland: Southern Book Co., Baltimore, 1956.
  • Lippincott, J.B. and Joseph Thomas M. D. LL. D. Lippincott's Pronouncing Biographical Dictionary. Philadelphia, PA: University of Nevada, Reno Library, 1890.
  • Pope, Charles Henry. The pioneers of Massachusetts, a descriptive list, drawn from records of the colonies, towns and churches and other contemporaneous documents. Boston: C.H. Pope, 1900. (Archive.org : accessed 24 Aug 2016).
  • Stratton, Eugene Aubrey, FASG. Plymouth Colony Its History & People. The Generations Network, Inc., Provo, Utah: Ancestry Publishing, 1986.
  • Willison, George F., Saints and Strangers, Cornwall, New York: The Cornwall Press, 1943, Third Printing.
  • Woodworth-Barnes, Esther Littleford and Alicia Crane Williams. Mayflower Families through Five Generations. Vol 16 Part 1 of 3, John Alden. Boston, Mass.: General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2002.
  • FamilySearch
  • Source for the Illustrations: Ancestry.com. Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000. Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007. Original data - Various photo collections from the L Note: Ancestry.com, Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000 (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2007

Additional Reading

  • Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1978.


MEMORIAL

Excerpted from: Alden, Ebenezer, 1788-1881. Memorial of the descendants of the Hon. John Alden. Randolph, Mass., Printed by S. P. Brown for the family, 1867. iBooks. This material may be protected by copyright.

I. The Honorable John Alden, ancestor of most persons bearing the name of Alden in this country, was one of the Plymouth Pilgrims, and the last male survivor of those who came in the May Flower, and signed the compact in her cabin in 1620.
He was not of the Leyden Church, but, as Bradford in his "History of Plimouth Plantation " informs us, "was hired for a cooper at Southampton, where the ship victuled; and being a hopful yong man was much desired, but left to his own liking to go or stay when he came here; but he stayed and marycd here"
He was distinguished for practical wisdom, integrity and decision, and early acquired and retained during his long life a commanding influence over his associates. He was much employed in public business ;, was an assistant to the Governor for many years: and in every position he occupied fulfilled hi3 duties promptly and to the satisfaction of his employers.
His ancestors in England have not been traced, so far as is known to the writer.
He was born in 1599, and' died" at Duxbury 12th September 1687, "in a good old age, an old man, and full of years; and was gathered to his people,—and his sons buried him."
He married, probably in 1621, Priscilla, daughter of Mr. William Molines, or Mullens, who with his wife came also in the May Flower, and both died in the February succeeding their landing.
Tradition represents Priscilla to have been very beautiful in her youth; and John also was a comely person; and considering his other accomplishments, it is not surprising, that when he was sent by Captain Standish, after the death of his wife, to solicit her hand in marriage, she preferred the messenger to the message.
"As he warmed and glowed, in his simple and eloquent language,
Quite forgetful of self, and full of the praise of his rival,
Archly the maiden smiled, and, with eyes overrunning with laughter
Said, in a tremulous voice, 'Why don't you speak for yourself, John?'"
Their residence after a few years was in Duxbury, on the north side of the village, on a farm which is still in possession of their descendants of the seventh generation, having never been alienated.
He made no will, having distributed the greater part of his estate among his children during his life time. Jonathan, his third son with whom he resided on the old homestead, administered on his estate, and made a final settlement with the heirs June 13, 1688.
The settlement is as follows - "We whose names are subscribed, personally interested in the estate of John Alden senior of Duxbury, Esquire, lately deceased, do hereby aknowledge ourselves to have received, each of us our full personal proportion thereof from Jonathan Alden, Administrator thereof, do by these presents for ourselves, our heirs and executors acquit, discharge fully the said Jonathin Alden, his heirs forever of and from all rights, dues, demands whatsover, relating to the aforesaid eseate.
In witness wheref we have hereunto subscribed and sealed this 13 day of JuneAnno Domini 1688.
John Alden, (Sea?.)
Joseph Alden, {Seal.)
David Alden, {Seal.) 1
Priscilla Alden, {Seal.)
William Payrody, {Seal.)
Alexander Standish, {Seal.) in the right of Sarah, my wife, deceased.
John Bass, {Seal.) in the right of my wife Ruth, deceased.
Mary Alden, {Seal.)
Thomas Dillano, {Seal.)

Family Search shows parents of John -George Charles Joseph Alden, 1575-1620 & Mary Jane Fowke. 1584-1664; grandparents-Richard Alden, 1531-1598 & Aoys Alden, 1540-1569, and Roger Fowlk (no b/d dates) & Joane Moreton, 1552-1590. Both John & Priscilla buried Myles Standish Burying Ground, Duxbury, Plymouth County, Mass--per Billion Graves.

Acknowledgments

At least 40 different profiles were merged to make this composite. At least three biographical sketches were found in the merged profiles. The illustrations were added by Michael Stephenson. The authors of the biographies are Unfortunately not known at this time. Additional sources were listed in the original profiles and have been backed up off-line.


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Images: 7
John Alden and Priscilla Statuette
John Alden and Priscilla Statuette

John Alden headstone
John Alden headstone

"Why Don't You Speak For Yourself, John?", by George H. Boughton

Broadside commemorting the death of John Alden by Rev. John Cotton
Broadside commemorting the death of John Alden by Rev. John Cotton

John Alden Image 5
John Alden Image 5

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On 8 Nov 2018 at 12:10 GMT Anne B wrote:

Becky just go ahead and delete it. I evidently forgot to remove it when I removed the project box. Someone else added it.

On 8 Nov 2018 at 12:08 GMT Becky (Nally) Syphers wrote:

Why is the Puritan Great Migration project profile added to the trusted list?

On 8 Nov 2018 at 11:48 GMT Becky (Nally) Syphers wrote:

This profile obviously represents Mayflower Passenger John Alden. There is an outstanding merge which should be completed.

On 6 Nov 2018 at 23:19 GMT Anne B wrote:

Since the parents attached have another son John. I am disconnecting parents, removing bad death date and merging with the Mayflower John Alden, which from the change log, he was clearly meant to be.

On 11 Oct 2018 at 21:13 GMT Anne B wrote:

I didn't find any, but England is beyond my paygrade. Actually I searched around for Blunden - zip. The only Alden bpt 1598 in England was a Richard. (looked on FreeReg, Ancestry and Family search.)

On 11 Oct 2018 at 11:41 GMT Jillaine Smith wrote:

Anne, is there any evidence that there was a real couple named George Joseph Alden and Jane Essex Fowke? And did they have a child named John baptized on that date and location? If so, we should leave him as is, but remove the death information and the gravestone photo and mark him a rejected match with the Mayflower John Alden, yes?

On 11 Oct 2018 at 09:46 GMT Anne B wrote:

After looking at the change log and the plethora of family search user submitted genealogies, there is no doubt in my mind that despite the incorrect death date, and the bad parents that this profile (at least) was meant to be the Mayflower John Alden. I believe we should disconnect the bad parents and merge with Mayflower John. Sound reasonable? Objections?

On 6 Sep 2018 at 04:45 GMT Anne B wrote:

Hello Kevin, If you read the last paragraph "John Alden died, intestate, ..." You will see that all 10 children listed, or their representatives ie. husbands, are named in a release dated in 1688. Mary and Priscilla are unmarried (still Aldens) and Rebecca was represented by her husband Thomas Dillano.

You are right about the "H." Southampton, NY doesn't have an extra H either.

On 6 Sep 2018 at 02:27 GMT Kevin Sands wrote:

1. My research shows that John & Priscilla had 8 adult children - not 10.

2. They did not have daughters Priscilla or Rebecca. 3. Mary m. 'Delano' - not Rebecca. 4. "Southhampton, England"... well, if any of this had been written by an English person they would know that there is only one 'H' in Southampton, England!

On 15 Feb 2018 at 00:28 GMT Paul Boudreau wrote:

Alden-2581 and Alden-63 appear to represent the same person because: I think these two profiles are for the same person

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John is 12 degrees from Kay Sands, 13 degrees from Grant Wood and 14 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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