Samuel Allen

Samuel Allen (1588 - abt. 1648)

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Samuel Allen aka Allyn, Allyen, Allin,
Born in Englandmap
Son of and [mother unknown]
Brother of
Husband of — married [date unknown] (to about 28 Apr 1648) [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died about in Windsor, Connecticutmap
Profile last modified 20 Dec 2019 | Created 27 Jan 2011
This page has been accessed 5,547 times.
The Puritan Great Migration.
Samuel Allen migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
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Biography

Born about 1608 in England, not 1588.: Matthew Grant's Record of Windsor gives an accounting of the number of children born in Windsor, from the beginning to 1677. The last section of the list contains: some omitted in the former records being gone yet had children born here -- Samuell Alyen 6 children.[1] Having six children in the span of time from his settlement in Windsor to his death in 1648 indicates that Samuel Allen came to Windsor as a young married man and that most of his children were born in Windsor. "As a corollary, it is unlikely that he was sixty at death and born 1588, as sometimes stated an more probably he was some twenty years younger.[2]

Not the brother of Matthew Allen of Hartford and Thomas Allen of Barnstable as is frequently stated. Matthew Allen of Hartford and Thomas Allen of Braintree were brothers but their parents, Richard and Margaret (Wyott) Allen did not have a child Samuel. Confusion can be caused because Samuel probably was the brother of Deacon Thomas Allen of Middletown, Connecticut, who made Samuel's son Obadiah and his children heirs to his estate.[2]

Samuel Alyen was an early settler of Windsor Connecticut.[3] Reference was made on 18 March 1638/9 to the house of Samuel Allen in Windsor.[4] He served on a jury 5 Mar 1644/5.[2]

Samuel's wife was Ann. She was born about 1608. She deposed 7 July 1662 that she was 54 years. She married (2) William Hurlbut and had three additional children. She died Northampton, Massachusetts, 13 Nov 1687.[5]

Samuel was buried 28 April 1648 in Windsor.[6][7][8]

His Inventory was taken 8 Sep 1648. It consisted of his house and home lot, 4 acres of meadow, 15 acres over the Great River, 18 acres of upland valued at about £37. His goods were 3 beds and some furniture, a table cloth and napkins, his cloths, 3 iron pots, some pewter and brass items. The whole total being £76. 18. 08.[9]

Samuel has a memorial stone in Enfield, Connecticut, where many of his descendants are buried.[10]

Children:[6][2]

  • Samuel m 29 Nov 1659 Hannah Woodford
  • Nehemiah m. 21 Sep 1664 Sarah Woodford,
  • John m. 8 Dec 1669 Mary Hannum
  • Rebecca d. Northampton 8 May 1697
  • Child died 1648.
  • Obadiah d. Middletown, Connecticut 7 Apr 1712. Obadiah was adopted as heir by his uncle Deacon Thomas Allen of Middletown Connecticut who died October 16 1688. Deacon Thomas Allen made Obadiah Allen, and his children his heir. It can be conluded that Thomas and Samuel were brothers.[2]

Sources

  1. Grant, Matthew. Some early records and documents of and relating to the town of Windsor, Connecticut, 1639-1703 (Hartford: Hartford, Connecticut historical society, 1930) p. 93
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Jacobus, Donald Lines and Edgar Francis Waterman. Hale, House and Related Families Mainly of the Connecticut River Valley. (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1978.) pp 447-451
  3. The history and genealogies of ancient Windsor, Connecticut : including East Windsor, South Windsor, Bloomfield, Windsor Locks, and Ellington, 1635-1891, by Stiles, Henry Reed, 1832-1909 Hartford, Conn. : Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co. 1893 Vol 1 pt 1 page 150
  4. The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume 1, A-B, by Robert Charles Anderson, George F. Sanborn, Jr., and Melinde Lutz Sanborn. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1999. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) page 40, citing Windsor Hist 1:150.
  5. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2010), (Originally Published as: New England Historic Genealogical Society. Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III, 3 vols., 1995). William Hurlbut Sketch. https://www.americanancestors.org/DB393/i/12107/1038/1415515391
  6. 6.0 6.1 Genealogies of Connecticut Families (Genealogical Publishing Company, 1983) Vol. 1, Page 14
  7. "Connecticut Deaths and Burials, 1772-1934," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F7CZ-Z26 : 9 February 2018), Samuel Allen, 1648; citing Connecticut, United States, reference ; FHL microfilm 3,078.
  8. Windsor. Connecticut Vital Records to 1850 (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2011.) (From original typescripts, Lucius Barnes Barbour Collection, 1928.) p. 8. Link at AmericanAncestors ($)
  9. Manwaring, Charles William. A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records.Volume 1. Hartford District 1635-1700. Hartford, Conn., R.S. Peck & Co., Printers, 1904.) p. 3
  10. Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 June 2019), memorial page for Samuel Allen (1588–28 Apr 1648), Find A Grave: Memorial #13568597, citing Enfield Street Cemetery, Enfield, Hartford County, Connecticut, USA ; Maintained by Judith Lee Howard Shea (contributor 47962427) .


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Comments: 15

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Different men named Allen are conflated in this and connected profiles, and some old discredited theories are being revived in the process.

PGM settlers included brothers Thomas Allen of Barnstable & Matthew Allen of (first) Cambridge and (later) Windsor, but Donald Lines Jacobus, in Hale, House, and Related Families: Mainly of the Connecticut River Valley, and Robert Charles Anderson, in the Great Migration books, firmly rejected the oft-stated notion that these men were brothers to Samuel Allen of Windsor (this man).

Samuel Allen of Windsor (this man) & Thomas Allen of Middletown apparently were brothers, according to Jacobus. Thomas of Middletown isn't in the Great Migration Directory, so he may have arrived after 1640. Samuel's origins are unknown, per Great Migration Directory.

posted by Ellen Smith
Thanks Ellen, I've reworked the profile, a little making the relationships clear. and disconnected Matthew (and proposed a merge)
posted by Anne B
To address Ellen's comment from nearly a year ago (13 Sep 2018), I had already made all of my intended changes at the time I entered my comment. At that time, I believe I had removed all information on this profile (Allen-1644) that pertained to the other Samuel Allen of Massachusetts.

I am hopeful that the current profile represents the most accurate information for this Samuel Allen, and would encourage anyone with more in-depth knowledge to add to this profile.

posted by Bryan McCullagh
Hello all. While researching another line I came across a neat e-book: Genealogical and Historical Sketches of the Allen family of Dedham and Medfield, Mass., 1637-1890 by Frank Allen Hutchinson (pub 1896). This book records a lot about this Windsor, CT family.
Bryan, were you unable to finish your planned changses? It looks like this profile still represents (or has been edited to represent) a hybrid of Samuel Allen of Braintree and Samuel Allen of Windsor. If you simply haven't had time to make the changes, would it be OK with you for some other member to work on refocusing it on Samuel of Windsor?

Note: Samuel of Windsor is briefly treated in The Great Migration, vol. 1, page 40. It is stated that his house at Windsor was mentioned on 18 March 1638/9 and he resided at Windsor until is death in 1648. Also that there is no reason to think that he was the Samuel Allen who was made freeman in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635.

posted by Ellen Smith
With regards to the comment by Robin Lee, below, I will attempt to rectify this profile. Robin is correct in that there were two contemporary Samuel Allen's in the New World: one in Braintree MA, and one in Connecticut.

Since the Samuel Allen of Braintree is well-represented in the profile Samuel Allen, I propose we designate this profile as the Samuel Allen of Connecticut, and disambiguate these two profiles as much as possible.

Towards that end, I am removing wife Ann (Whitmore?), removing the Biography information which pertains to the other Samuel Allen of Braintree, MA, and correcting the death date to 1648.

posted by Bryan McCullagh
There are two men named Samuel Allen, one lived in Connecticut, the other lived in Massachusetts.....Looking at the sources it would appear that this profile was meant to be the Samuel that lived in Connecticut. But the write up is for the man from Massachusetts. I would like to "fix this profile".
posted by Robin Lee
Allen-21888 and Allen-1644 are not ready to be merged because: They could be 2 different generations and the wife wrong on one of them. Further research needed.
posted by Sheryl Moore
Allen-21888 and Allen-1644 appear to represent the same person because: same wife, Allen-1644 seems to have sources to prove data
posted by Robin Lee
Allen-21888 and Allen-1644 do not represent the same person because: Different death dates in different colonies.

Samuel is 17 degrees from Mary Pickford, 13 degrees from Cheryl Skordahl and 13 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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Categories: Windsor, Connecticut | Puritan Great Migration