Eleanor Aquitaine

Eleanor of Aquitaine (abt. 1122 - 1204)

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Eleanor of Aquitaine
Born about in Aquitaine, Francemap
Ancestors ancestors
Wife of — married (to ) in ANNULLED, Bordeaux Cathedral, Bordeaux, Aquitaine, Francemap
Wife of — married (to ) in Poitiers, Francemap
Descendants descendants
Died in Mirabell Castle, Tarn-et-Garonne, Midi-Pyrenees, Francemap
Profile last modified | Created 8 Jun 2011 | Last significant change: 6 Oct 2018
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Categories: House of Poitiers | House of Plantagenet | 12th Century | Second Crusade | This Day In History March 31 | This Day In History May 18 | This Day In History July 25.


European Aristocracy
Eleanor Aquitaine was a member of aristocracy in Europe.
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Contents

Name and Titles

Name: Eleanor of Aquitaine [1] [2]
- French: Aliénor d'Aquitaine
- Latin: Alienora
Duchess of Aquitaine - She succeeded to Duchy of Aquitaine following the death of her father in 1137. Her guardian, Louis VI king of France, quickly married her to his son the future Louis VII in order to bring the duchy to the direct control of the kings of France.
Queen consort of France - Following the death of Louis VI, she and her husband were crowned King and Queen of the Franks on Christmas Day 1137. She held this title until her marriage was annulled in 1152.
Queen consort of England - Her second husband, Henry II of England, succeeded to the throne of England on 25 October 1152. He and Eleanor were crowned King and Queen of England on 19 December 1154.

Birth

Born: Between 1122 and 1124, presumably in Aquitaine, France.
The exact date and place of her death is not known with certainty. No statements are contemporary.
Said to have been aged 13 in the spring of 1137.
Said to have received the fidelity oath of some lords of Aquitaine on the occasion of Eleanor's fourteenth birthday in 1136.
Said to have been aged 82 at her death in 1204.
It has been said she was born at Nieul-sur-Autize, Vendée or at Château de Belin, Guyenne or at Palais d’Ombrière, Bordeaux. None of these are confirmed by contemporary documents.

Marriages and Children

Married: 1st - Louis VII of France, (future) king of France on 25 July 1137 at the Cathedral of Saint-André in Bordeaux, France. This marriage was annulled on grounds of consanguinity within the fourth degree on 21 March 1152.
Married: 2nd - Henry II of England, (future) king of England on 18 May 1152 at Bordeaux Cathedral in Bordeaux, Aquitaine, France.
Children of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine:
  1. Marie of France, Countess of Champagne. Born in 1145. She married Henri I, Count of Palatine of Troyes, Count of Champagneand Brie. She died on 11 March 1198 in Champagne-Ardenne, France.
  2. Alix of France, Countess of Blois. Born in 1150. She married Thibaut V, Count of Blois, Dunois and Chartres.
Children of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine:
  1. William of England. Born 17 August 1153 in Normandy, France. Died about 25 December 1156 at Wallingford Castle in Berkshire, England.
  2. Henry of England "the Young King", king of England. Born 28 February 1155 at Bermondsey, Surrey England. Crowned joint king of England on 14 June 1170. Died 11 June 1183 at Chateau Martel in Touraine.
  3. Matilda of England. Born 1156 in London, England.
  4. Richard of England "Lionheart", King of England. Born 8 September 1157 in Oxford, England. Succeeded as King of England on 6 July 1183. He died 6 April 1199 during a seige at Chalus in Limousin. No issue.
  5. Geoffrey of England. Born 23 September 1158. In the right of his wife he was the Duke of Brittany and Earl of Richmond. He was killed in a tournament on 19 August 1186 in Paris, France.
  6. Eleanor of England, Queen of Castile. She married Alphonso VIII, King of Castile.
  7. Joan of England, Queen of Sicily. Born October 1165 in Angers, France. She married 1st William II le bon, King of Sicily; she married 2nd Raymond VI, Count of Toulese. She died 24 September 1199 in Rouen, France.
  8. John of England "Lackland", King of England. Born about 27 December 1166 in Oxford, England. He succeeded his brother as King of England on 6 April 1199. He was mortally wounded at the capture of Damietta (now in Egypt) on 6 June 1249.

Death and Burial of Eleanor of Aquitaine

Died: 31 March 1204
Buried: Abbey of Fontevrault [3]
Eleanor of Aquitaine died on 31 March 1204 and was buried at Fontevrault, the burial place of her second husband, Henry II (d.1189) and son Richard (d.1199). The effigy to the north-west of the group of four in the Fontevrault nave is generally ascribed to the queen on the basis of the crown, bier format and tufa medium, which group it with the Fontevrault effigies of Henry II and Richard I. The original position of the Fontevrualt-Angevin monuments, together with their peregrinations are not recorded, but they were probably located near the abbey high altar. [4]

Notes

Eleanor, the Duchess of Aquitaine is one of -- if not -- the most captivating woman of her day. More powerful and equipped then the tinier kingdoms of France and the Angevin county that Henry II came from .... she had it all.[3]
Rich beyond belief. Loved by the troubadours. Praised and hated the world over for her girly flirtations and natural beauty. And most definitely respected and reviled for her business and political acumen ... chroniclers tend to lean according to subjective views. Hence, the researcher has to pour through mountains of gossip and scandal surrounding her life to get at the known facts.[3]
What we do know is that the Duchess was raised in a very refined court. She loved art, poetry, music and fashion. She is also the person who went on to establish certain manners at the dinner table of the French court by introducing table-cloths and hand-washing, in addition to some remodeling for ventilation. But Eleanor was no average lady of a household. She was assertive from go.[3]
Having acquired the necessary skills in youth, she was very capable of handling her vassals and taking care of a kingdom's administrative affairs. She did not cower in the face of war. But what she could not do was control the wagging tongues and sexism that attempted to negate her power both during her life-time and after her death. And sadly, both of the men she married were just a little too obsessed with taking her inheritance ... not to mention the fact that they both had her arrested.
Louis ... because he got jealous and felt threatened by another man.[5] And Henry was just a life-long control freak when it came to power.[6] He may have been a great administrator and warrior, but his own family didn't turn on him for no reason.[3]
In hindsight, Eleanor's story is full of strife. For all her possessions, she barely had a moment's peace. Nevertheless, she was both mother and step-mother to a very powerful brood, who gave birth to the Plantagenet dynasty. Without her, Henry II would not have been been able to rule such a wide territory.[3]


Sources

Footnotes and citations:
  1. Cawley, Medieval Lands: Eleonore d'Aquitaine
  2. Richardson, Royal Ancestry, (2013): vol. I p. 24, 129; vol. III p. 21.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Weir, Alison (1998). Eleanor of Aquitaine. eBook.
  4. Duffy. Royal Tombs (2003):57, 60.
  5. 1146 Second Crusade led by Louis VII. Eleanor went and bogged him down with luggage on a military expedition. Ends up being arrested by jealous Louis over her uncle in the Middle East. The witnesses present thought she and her uncle got along too well and the two were flirting ... to say the least. And Eleanor actually tried to stay with him while Louis went on ahead to fight. That's when Louis' advisors convinced him Eleanor was up to no good. So the king had her arrested. You didn't do that to a Queen ... So people took the legal action as a sign that Eleanor was guilty. And she just couldn't live down the rumors that spread like fire. it was even more tragic because historians pretty much agree that Louis loved her to pieces. It was some of his courtiers and members of the clergy that wanted to take her out.
  6. 1174-1189: Henry II put Eleanor on house arrest following family revolt.
Source list:
  • Richardson, Douglas. Royal Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, in 5 vols. (Salt Lake City, Utah, 2013): vol. I p. 24, 129; vol. III p. 21.
  • Duffy, Mark. Royal Tombs of Medieval England. (2003):57, 60.
  • The Concise Columbia Encyclopedia (1995). Columbia University Press
  • Weis, F.L. (1999). Magna Charta Sureties, 1215. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co.
  • Stevens, W.S. (1971). Our royal ancestors. Lexington: Transylvania Print. Co.
  • Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne's Descendants. Vol I - III


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Memories: 2

On 3 Dec 2011 Roger Wehr wrote:

Eleanor of Aquitaine (in French: Aliénor d’Aquitaine, Éléonore de Guyenne) (1122 or 1124 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. As well as being Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right, she was queen consort of France (1137–1152) and of England (1154–1189). She was the patroness of such literary figures as Wace, Benoît de Sainte-More, and Chrétien de Troyes.

Eleanor succeeded her father as suo jure Duchess of Aquitaine and Countess of Poitiers at the age of fifteen, and thus became the most eligible bride in Europe. Three months after her accession she married Louis VII, son and junior co-ruler of her guardian, King Louis VI of France. As Queen of France, she participated in the unsuccessful Second Crusade. Soon after the Crusade was over, Eleanor asked Louis for a divorce, as their marriage had only produced a daughter, Marie.[2] Instead, Eleanor was forced by Pope Eugene III to reconcile with Louis,[3] which led to the birth of Alix, another daughter, whose gender proved to be the final blow to the union.[4] The royal marriage was annulled on 11 March 1152, on the grounds of consanguinity within the fourth degree. Their daughters were declared legitimate and custody was awarded to Louis, while Eleanor's lands were restored to her.

As soon as the annulment was granted, Eleanor became engaged to Henry II, Duke of the Normans, her cousin within the third degree, who was nine years younger. On 18 May 1152, eight weeks after the annulment of her first marriage, Eleanor married the Duke of the Normans. On 25 October 1154 her husband ascended the throne of the Kingdom of England, making Eleanor Queen of the English. Over the next thirteen years, she bore Henry eight children: five sons, three of whom would become king, and three daughters. However, Henry and Eleanor eventually became estranged. She was imprisoned between 1173 and 1189 for supporting her son Henry's revolt against her husband.

Eleanor was widowed on 6 July 1189. Her husband was succeeded by their son, Richard the Lionheart, who immediately released his mother. Now queen dowager, Eleanor acted as a regent for her son while he went off on the Third Crusade. Eleanor survived her son Richard and lived well into the reign of her youngest son King John. By the time of her death she had outlived all of her children except for King John and Eleanor, Queen of Castile.



On 29 Jun 2011 Ted Williams wrote:

Eleanor of Aquitaine (in French: Aliénor d’Aquitaine, Éléonore de Guyenne) (1122 or 1124 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. As well as being Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right, she was queen consort of France (1137–1152) and of England (1154–1189). Eleanor of Aquitaine is the only woman to have been queen of both France and England. She was the patroness of such literary figures as Wace, Benoît de Sainte-More, and Chrétien de Troyes.

Eleanor succeeded her father as suo jure Duchess of Aquitaine and Countess of Poitiers at the age of fifteen, and thus became the most eligible bride in Europe. Three months after her accession she married Louis VII, son and junior co-ruler of her guardian, King Louis VI of France. As Queen of France, she participated in the unsuccessful Second Crusade. Soon after the Crusade was over, Louis VII and Eleanor agreed to dissolve their marriage, because of Eleanor's own desire for divorce and also because the only children they had were two daughters – Marie and Alix. The royal marriage was annulled on 11 March 1152, on the grounds of consanguinity within the fourth degree. Their daughters were declared legitimate and custody of them awarded to Louis, while Eleanor's lands were restored to her.

As soon as she arrived in Poitiers, Eleanor became engaged to Henry II, Duke of the Normans, her cousin within the third degree, who was nine years younger. On 18 May 1152, eight weeks after the annulment of her first marriage, Eleanor married the Duke of the Normans. On 25 October 1154 her husband ascended the throne of the Kingdom of England, making Eleanor Queen of the English. Over the next thirteen years, she bore Henry eight children: five sons, three of whom would become king, and three daughters. However, Henry and Eleanor eventually became estranged. She was imprisoned between 1173 and 1189 for supporting her son Henry's revolt against her husband, King Henry II.

Eleanor was widowed on 6 July 1189. Her husband was succeeded by their son, Richard the Lionheart, who immediately moved to release his mother. Now queen dowager, Eleanor acted as a regent for her son while he went off on the Third Crusade. Eleanor survived her son Richard and lived well into the reign of her youngest son King John. By the time of her death she had outlived all of her children except for King John and Eleanor, Queen of Castile.

Early life

The exact date and place of Eleanor's birth are not known. A late 13th century genealogy of her family listed her as 13 years old in the spring of 1137.[2] Some chronicles mentionned a fidelity oath of some lords of Aquitaine on the occasion of Eleanor's fourteenth birthday in 1136. Her parents almost certainly married in 1121. Her birth place may have been Poitiers, Bordeaux, or Nieul-sur-l'Autise, where her mother died as she was 6 or 8.[3]

Eleanor or Aliénor was the oldest of three children of William X, Duke of Aquitaine, whose glittering ducal court was on the leading edge of early–12th-century culture, and his wife, Aenor de Châtellerault, the daughter of Aimeric I, Viscount of Châtellerault, and Dangereuse, who was William IX's longtime mistress as well as Eleanor's maternal grandmother. Her parents' marriage had been arranged by Dangereuse with her paternal grandfather, the Troubadour.

Eleanor was named for her mother Aenor and called Aliénor, from the Latin alia Aenor, which means the other Aenor. It became Eléanor in the langues d'oïl (Northern French) and Eleanor in English.[4] There is, however, an earlier Eleanor on record: Eleanor of Normandy, William the Conqueror's aunt, who lived a century earlier than Eleanor of Aquitaine.

By all accounts, Eleanor's father ensured that she had the best possible education.[5] Although her native tongue was Poitevin, she was taught to read and speak Latin, was well versed in music and literature, and schooled in riding, hawking, and hunting.[6] Eleanor was extroverted, lively, intelligent, and strong willed. In the spring of 1130, when Eleanor was six, her four-year-old brother William Aigret and their mother died at the castle of Talmont, on Aquitaine's Atlantic coast. Eleanor became the heir presumptive to her father's domains. The Duchy of Aquitaine was the largest and richest province of France; Poitou (where Eleanor spent most of her childhood) and Aquitaine together were almost one-third the size of modern France. Eleanor had only one other legitimate sibling, a younger sister named Aelith but always called Petronilla. Her half brothers, William and Joscelin, were acknowledged by William X as his sons, but not as his heirs. Later, during the first four years of Henry II's reign, all three siblings joined Eleanor's royal household. [edit] Inheritance

In 1138, Duke William X set out from Poitiers to Bordeaux, taking his daughters with him. Upon reaching Bordeaux, he left Eleanor and Petronilla in the charge of the Archbishop of Bordeaux, one of the Duke's few loyal vassals who could be entrusted with the safety of the duke's daughters. The duke then set out for the Shrine of Saint James of Compostela, in the company of other pilgrims; however, he died on Good Friday 9 April 1137.

Eleanor, aged about fifteen, became the Duchess of Aquitaine, and thus the most eligible heiress in Europe. As these were the days when kidnapping an heiress was seen as a viable option for obtaining a title, William had dictated a will on the very day he died, bequeathing his domains to Eleanor and appointing King Louis VI of France as her guardian.[9] William requested the King to take care of both the lands and the duchess, and to also find her a suitable husband.[5] However, until a husband was found, the King had the legal right to Eleanor's lands. The Duke also insisted to his companions that his death be kept a secret until Louis was informed – the men were to journey from Saint James across the Pyrenees as quickly as possible, to call at Bordeaux to notify the Archbishop, and then to make all speed to Paris, to inform the King.

The King of France himself was also gravely ill at that time, suffering "a flux of the bowels" (dysentery) from which he seemed unlikely to recover. Despite his immense obesity and impending mortality, however, Louis the Fat remained clear-minded. To his concerns regarding his new heir, Louis, who had been destined for the monastic life of a younger son (the former heir, Philip, having died from a riding accident),[10] was added joy over the death of one of his most powerful vassals – and the availability of the best duchy in France. Presenting a solemn and dignified manner to the grieving Aquitainian messengers, upon their departure he became overjoyed, stammering in delight.

Rather than act as guardian to the Duchess and duchy, he decided, he would marry the duchess to his heir and bring Aquitaine under the French Crown, thereby greatly increasing the power and prominence of France and the Capets. Within hours, then, Louis had arranged for his 17 year-old son, Prince Louis, to be married to Eleanor, with Abbot Suger in charge of the wedding arrangements. Prince Louis was sent to Bordeaux with an escort of 500 knights, as well as Abbot Suger, Theobald II, Count of Champagne and Count Ralph. First marriage On 25 July 1137 the couple was married in the Cathedral of Saint-André in Bordeaux by the Archbishop of Bordeaux.[5] Immediately after the wedding, the couple were enthroned as Duke and Duchess of Aquitaine.[5][5] However, there was a catch: the land would remain independent of France until Eleanor's oldest son becomes both King of the Franks and Duke of Aquitaine. Thus, her holdings would not be merged with France until the next generation. She gave Louis a wedding present that is still in existence, a rock crystal vase, currently on display at the Louvre.[5][10][11]

Eleanor's tenure as junior Queen of the Franks lasted only few days. On 1 August, Eleanor's father-in-law died and her husband became sole monarch. Eleanor was anointed and crowned Queen of the Franks on Christmas Day of the same year.[5][8]

Possessing a high-spirited nature, Eleanor was not popular with the staid northerners (according to sources, Louis´ mother, Adélaide de Maurienne, thought her flighty and a bad influence) – she was not aided by memories of Queen Constance, the Provençal wife of Robert II, tales of whose immodest dress and language were still told with horror.[12]

Her conduct was repeatedly criticized by Church elders (particularly Bernard of Clairvaux and Abbot Suger) as indecorous. The King, however, was madly in love with his beautiful and worldly bride and granted her every whim, even though her behavior baffled and vexed him to no end. Much money went into beautifying the austere Cité Palace in Paris for Eleanor's sake

Conflict Eleanor's grandfather, William IX of Aquitaine, gave her this rock crystal vase, which she in turn gave to Louis as a wedding gift. He later donated it to the Abbey of Saint-Denis. This is the only known surviving artifact of Eleanor's.

Although Louis was a pious man, he soon came into a violent conflict with Pope Innocent II. In 1141, the archbishopric of Bourges became vacant, and the King put forward as a candidate one of his chancellors, Cadurc, whilst vetoing the one suitable candidate, Pierre de la Chatre, who was promptly elected by the canons of Bourges and consecrated by the Pope. Louis accordingly bolted the gates of Bourges against the new Bishop; the Pope, recalling William X's similar attempts to exile Innocent's supporters from Poitou and replace them with priests loyal to himself, blamed Eleanor, saying that Louis was only a child and should be taught manners. Outraged, Louis swore upon relics that so long as he lived Pierre should never enter Bourges. This brought the interdict upon the King's lands. Pierre de la Chatre was given refuge by Theobald II, Count of Champagne.

Louis became involved in a war with Count Theobald of Champagne by permitting Raoul I, Count of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, Eleanor's sister. Eleanor urged Louis to support her sister's illegitimate marriage to Raoul of Vermandois. Champagne had also offended Louis by siding with the Pope in the dispute over Bourges. The war lasted two years (1142–44) and ended with the occupation of Champagne by the royal army. Louis was personally involved in the assault and burning of the town of Vitry. More than a thousand people (1300, some say) who had sought refuge in the church died in the flames.

Horrified, and desiring an end to the war, Louis attempted to make peace with Theobald in exchange for supporting the lift of the interdict on Raoul and Petronilla. This was duly lifted for long enough to allow Theobald's lands to be restored; it was then lowered once more when Raoul refused to repudiate Petronilla, prompting Louis to return to the Champagne and ravage it once more.

In June, 1144, the King and Queen visited the newly built cathedral at Saint-Denis. Whilst there, the Queen met with Bernard of Clairvaux, demanding that he have the excommunication of Petronilla and Raoul lifted through his influence on the Pope, in exchange for which King Louis would make concessions in Champagne, and recognise Pierre de la Chatre as archbishop of Bourges. Dismayed at her attitude, Bernard scolded her for her lack of penitence and her interference in matters of state. In response, Eleanor broke down, and meekly excused her behaviour, claiming to be bitter because of her lack of children. In response to this, Bernard became more kindly towards her: "My child, seek those things which make for peace. Cease to stir up the King against the Church, and urge upon him a better course of action. If you will promise to do this, I in return promise to entreat the merciful Lord to grant you offspring."

In a matter of weeks, peace had returned to France: Theobald's provinces had been returned, and Pierre de la Chatre was installed as Archbishop of Bourges. In April 1145, Eleanor gave birth to a daughter, Marie.

Louis, however still burned with guilt over the massacre at Vitry-le-Brûlé, and desired to make a Pilgrimage to the Holy Land in order to atone for his sins. Fortuitously for him, in the Autumn of 1145, Pope Eugenius requested Louis to lead a Crusade to the Middle East, to rescue the Frankish Kingdoms there from disaster. Accordingly, Louis declared on Christmas Day 1145 at Bourges his intention of going on a crusade.




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Images: 7
Typical Depiction of Eleanor
Typical Depiction of Eleanor

Eleanor's Tomb Effigy
Eleanor's Tomb Effigy

Eleanor d' Aquitaine Image 3
Eleanor d' Aquitaine Image 3

House of Anjou / Plantagenet
House of Anjou / Plantagenet

Eleanor d'Aquitaine Image 5
Eleanor d'Aquitaine Image 5

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Collaboration

On 13 Sep 2018 at 04:32 GMT Jerie Leep wrote:

In the play, "A Lion in Winter", my Great+etc Grandmother was said to have ridden bare-breasted with the other ladies of the retinue during the unsuccessful crusade she joined. It may be a dramatic effect for the play, but it seems to be within the realm of Eleanor's persona.

On 19 May 2018 at 15:17 GMT Christine (Raffo) Zakary wrote:

Will the Profile Managers please remove the personal genealogy connection comments. The appropriate place to post and brag about blood relations is on our personal Wikitree page. This page is dedicated to honoring Queen Eleanor, - not the thousands of her descendants

On 21 Apr 2018 at 16:01 GMT Stephen McCallum wrote:

558 Wikidata - Different death date

On 27 Feb 2018 at 03:13 GMT Kathleen (Rogan) Foster wrote:

Eleanor Aquitane shows as my 26th Great Grandmother

Direct Relationship Found There is a direct ancestral relationship. Eleanor Aquitaine is the great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great grand mother of Kathleen (Rogan) Foster.

Eleanor is the 26th great grandmother of Kathleen (Uncertain) 1. Kathleen is the daughter of Lillian (Cauldwell) Rogan [unknown confidence] 2. Lillian is the daughter of Vesta Elizabeth Ann Kinnear [unknown confidence] 3. Vesta is the daughter of Millicent Alberta (Noble) Kinnear [unknown confidence] 4. Millie is the daughter of Thomas Henry Noble [unknown confidence] 5. Thomas is the son of Hezekiah Noble [unknown confidence] 6. Hezekiah is the son of Thomas Smith Noble [unknown confidence] 7. Thomas is the son of Stephen Noble [unknown confidence] 8. Stephen is the son of Stephen Noble [unknown confidence] 9. Stephen is the son of Sarah Root [confident] 10. Sarah is the daughter of Sarah (Stebbins) Root [unknown confidence] 11. Sarah is the daughter of Edward Stebbins [unknown confidence] 12. Edward is the son of Hannah (Wright) Stebbins [unknown confidence] 13. Hannah is the daughter of Margaret (Stratton) Wright [unknown confidence] 14. Margaret is the daughter of Anne (Derehaugh) Stratton [uncertain] 15. Anne is the daughter of Mary (Wright) Derehaugh [confident] 16. Mary is the daughter of Frances (Spring) Wright [confident] 17. Frances is the daughter of Dorothy (Waldegrave) Spring [confident] 18. Dorothy is the daughter of Margery (Wentworth) Waldegrave [confident] 19. Margery is the daughter of Elizabeth (Howard) Wentworth [confident] 20. Elizabeth is the daughter of Henry Howard [unknown confidence] 21. Henry is the son of John Howard [unknown confidence] 22. John is the son of Robert Howard [unknown confidence] 23. Robert is the son of John Howard [unknown confidence] 24. John II is the son of Joan (Cornwall) Howard [unknown confidence] 25. Joan is the daughter of Richard (Plantagenet) of Cornwall [unknown confidence] 26. Richard is the son of Richard (Plantagenet) of England [confident] 27. Richard is the son of John (Plantagenet) of England [confident] 28. John is the son of Eleanor of Aquitaine [confident] This makes Eleanor the 26th great grandmother of Kathleen.

On 17 Nov 2017 at 19:33 GMT Isabelle Rassinot wrote:

Was really her first name at birth Eleanor? So her parents spoke English?

On 30 Oct 2017 at 16:39 GMT Eren Hatton wrote:

Eleanor is the 27th great grandmother of Eren (Uncertain)

1. Eren is the daughter of Bobby Hatton [confident] 2. Bobby is the son of Leroy Hatton [unknown confidence] 3. Leroy is the son of Roy Hatton [unknown confidence] 4. Roy is the son of Callie Louisa Couch [unknown confidence] 5. Callie is the daughter of William Lewis Couch [unknown confidence] 6. William is the son of Charity Powell [unknown confidence] 7. Charity is the daughter of Lewis Powell [unknown confidence] 8. Lewis is the son of Ambrose Powell [unknown confidence] 9. Ambrose is the son of John Powell II [unknown confidence] 10. John is the son of Robert Powell [unknown confidence] 11. Robert is the son of John Powell [unknown confidence] 12. John is the son of William Thomas Powell [uncertain] 13. William is the son of Margaret (Whitney) Powell [uncertain] 14. Margaret is the daughter of Robert Whitney [confident] 15. Robert is the son of Robert Whitney [unknown confidence] 16. Robert is the son of Robert Whitney [confident] 17. Robert is the son of Blanche (Milbourne) Whitney [confident] 18. Blanche is the daughter of Simon Milbourne Esq [confident] 19. Simon is the son of Elizabeth Ann Devereux [unknown confidence] 20. Elizabeth is the daughter of Agnes (Crophull) Devereux [unknown confidence] 21. Agnes is the daughter of Thomas (Crophull) de Crophull [unknown confidence] 22. Thomas is the son of Margery (Verdun) de Crophull [unknown confidence] 23. Margery is the daughter of Maud (Mortimer) de Verdun [unknown confidence] 24. Maud is the daughter of Edmund (Mortimer) de Mortimer Knt [unknown confidence] 25. Edmund is the son of Roger (Mortimer) de Mortimer Knt [unknown confidence] 26. Roger III is the son of Gwladus (ferch Llywelyn) de Mortimer [unknown confidence] 27. Gwladus is the daughter of Joan FitzJohn [unknown confidence] 28. Joan is the daughter of John (Plantagenet) of England [confident] 29. John is the son of Eleanor of Aquitaine [confident] This makes Eleanor the 27th great grandmother of Eren.

On 9 Aug 2017 at 03:55 GMT Michele Kennedy wrote:

It was quite exciting to see that I have a direct Ancestral line to Eleanor through my Paternal Grandmother.

On 1 Apr 2017 at 13:13 GMT Cynthia (Edgemon) Rushing wrote:

Why doesn't her name show Dutchess? If someone is looking for this individual they'd have to scroll to the bio to confirm. Also, it would be nice if the Royal project icon could be above her bio for quick confirmation. Any reason why this profile isn't PPP?

On 25 Apr 2015 at 18:53 GMT Linda (Linke) Philipp wrote:

I am so excited to find the link to Eleanor. I knew I was descended from her, but to find it here is wonderful. As I was working on my Bowen lineage I tapped into the link that opened it all up. I know she is my 24th - 28th Great Grandmother through many different lines. But I am if there is a link here to see my connection in all my lines to her?

On 10 Feb 2015 at 07:06 GMT Robert Kutz wrote:

Beaucher-1 and Aquitaine-84 appear to represent the same person because: Both married Henry II on the same date; Aquitaine-84 is the much more accurate and complete account.

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Eleanor is 34 degrees from Anne Buckmaster, 22 degrees from Franklin Roosevelt and 18 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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