Sancho (Aragón) de Aragón

Sancho Ramirez (Aragón) de Aragón (abt. 1042 - 1094)

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Sancho Ramirez "Rey de Aragón" de Aragón formerly Aragón
Born about in Españamap
Ancestors ancestors
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Husband of — married [location unknown]
Husband of — married [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Huesca, Aragón, Españamap
Profile last modified | Created 9 May 2017 | Last significant change: 28 Nov 2018
18:57: K. Anonymous edited the Biography for Sancho (Aragón) de Aragón. (Added acknowledgements section.) [Thank K. for this]
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Biography

About Sancho II Ramírez de Aragón, rey de Aragón Sancho Ramírez

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sancho Ramírez (c. 1042 – 4 June 1094) was King of Aragon (1063–1094, not formally until 1076) and King of Navarre (from 1076, as Sancho V). He was the son of Ramiro I of Aragon and Ermesinda of Bigorre, and he succeeded his father in 1063.

Between 1067 and 1068, the War of the Three Sanchos involved him in a conflict with his first cousins, both also named Sancho: Sancho IV the king of Navarre and Sancho II the king of Castile, respectively. The Castilian Sancho was trying to retake Bureba and Alta Rioja, which his father had given away to king of Navarre and failed to retake. The Navarrese Sancho begged the aid of the Aragonese Sancho to defend his kingdom. Sancho of Castile defeated the two cousins and retook both Bureba and Alta Rioja, as well as Álava.

Sancho Ramírez followed his father's practice, not using the royal title early in his reign even though his state had become fully independent. This changed in 1076, when Sancho IV of Navarre was murdered by his own siblings, thus prompting a succession crisis in this neighboring kingdom that represented Aragon's nominal overlord. At first, the murdered king's young son, García, who had fled to Castile, was recognized as titular king by Alfonso VI, while Sancho Ramírez recruited to his side noblemen of Navarre who resented their kingdom falling under Alfonso's influence. The crisis was resolved by partition. Sancho Ramírez was elected King of Navarre, while he ceded previously contested western provinces of the kingdom to Alfonso. From this time, Sancho refers to himself as king not only of Navarre but also Aragon.

Sancho conquered Barbastro in 1064, Graus in 1083, and Monzón in 1089. He was defeated by El Cid, who was raiding his lands and those of his Muslim allies, at the Battle of Morella, probably in 1084. He perished in 1094 at the Siege of Huesca, supposedly from an arrow while inspecting the walls of the Muslim stronghold.

Sancho contracted his first marriage in c.1065, to Isabel (died c.1071), daughter of Count Armengol III of Urgel. They were divorced 1071. His second marriage, in 1076, was with Felicia (died 3 May 1123), daughter of Count Hilduin III of Roucy. A third marriage—to Philippa of Toulouse—is sometimes given,[1] but other evidence records him as still married to Felicia at the time of his death.[2] He was father of three sons: by Isabel, he had Peter, his successor; by Felicia he had Alfonso, who succeeded Peter, and Ramiro, who succeeded Alfonso.[3]

References

1. ^ Richard, Alfred, Histoire de Comtes de Poitou, 778-1204 2. ^ Szabolcs de VAJAY, "Ramire II le Moine, roi d'Aragon et Agnes de Poitou dans l'histoire et la légende", in Mélanges offerts à René Crozet, 2 vol, Poitiers, 1966, vol 2, p 727-750; and Ruth E Harvey, "The wives of the first troubadour Duke William IX of Aquitaine", in Journal of Medieval History, vol 19, 1993, p 315. Harvey states that, contrary to prior assumptions, William IX was certainly Philippa of Toulouse's only husband. Vajay states that the marriage to an unnamed king of Aragon reported by a non-contemporary chronicler is imaginary, even though it has appeared broadly in modern histories, and likewise he cites J de Salarrullana de Dios, Documentos correspondientes al reinado de Sancho Ramirez, Saragossa, 1907, vol I, nr 51, p 204-207 to document that Felicie was clearly still married to Sancho months before his death, making the marriage to Philippa several years earlier, as reported in several modern popular biographies of her granddaughter, completely unsupportable. 3. ^ An origin legend of the house of Ayala gives him another son, Vela or Velasgutto de Ayala, by a Barcelonan lady. An alternative version makes the father Ramiro I. This story is without solid foundation, and may represent a confused memory of a feudal relationship with Sancho Ramírez of Viguera and his Vela clan vassals.


On his death in 1035 his Kingdom was shared out by testament to all his children, converting each county into a Kingdom. This way his son Ramiro inherited the county of Aragón, and his other son Gonzalo inherited Sobrarbe and Ribargorza.

This was the birth of the future Kingdom of Aragón, because Gonzalo was killed soon after and all the land he owned went to his brother Ramiro.

Ramiro I (1035-1064) was the first King of Aragón. He strengthened the defense of his properties, which doubled in extension in less than three decades, advancing towards the South and the East. By doing so he recaptured land from the Muslims and impeded the excessive expansion of the Catalan territory. In fact he lost his life in one of these battles.

After his death, his son Sancho Ramírez (1064 – 1094) inherited the Kingdom. His military exploits followed those of his father, although he advanced further politically. He realized that the best thing for his Kingdom would be modernization and to become more European. So, not only did he pledge loyalty to the Vatican in Rome, but he also brought about the Gregorian and Cluniacense reform, and installed the Roman faith to the detriment of that of the Mozarabics.

He gained possession of more land, because when his cousin The King of Pamplona died, he inherited that Kingdom. This was why Jaca became the capital. Also he tried to recapture cities like Barbastro, Tudela or Huesca. In fact , in 1094 he died at the foot of the wall of Huesca.

It was his son, King Pedro I (1094 –1104) who finally conquered the capital of Oscense after the Battle of Alcoraz, turning Huesca into the new capital. The reign of Pedro I only lasted 10 years. He died without leaving any descendants, which meant the Kingdom was inherited by his brother Alfonso I (1104- 1134), whose nickname “El Batallador”( The Warrior) alludes to his conquests, because he captured more than 25,000 square kilometres from the Muslims, including the city of Zaragoza.

He was the one who realized how important it was to find a way out to sea for the Kingdom, and for that reason he set out down the river Ebro with his armies.

Nevertheless, he did not reach his destination as he died leading his troops through the city of Fraga. Just like his predecessor he died childless, and according to his testament he left the Kingdom to the Military Order of the Temple, San Juan del Hospital and The Holy Grave. However, his last wish was not carried out, because the Aragon Assembly opposed it, and handed over the throne to another of the Ramirez brothers, the future King Ramiro II “El Monje”(The Monk).


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the king of Viguera, see Sancho Ramírez of Viguera.


Sancho (Sanciu filius, Sancho the son) with his father, King Ramiro (Ranimirus rex)

From a thirteenth-century manuscript of JacaSancho Ramírez (c. 1042 – 4 June 1094) was King of Aragon (1063–1094, not formally until 1076) and King of Navarre (from 1076, as Sancho V). He was the son of Ramiro I of Aragon and Ermesinda of Bigorre, and he succeeded his father in 1063.

Between 1067 and 1068, the War of the Three Sanchos involved him in a conflict with his first cousins, both also named Sancho: Sancho IV the king of Navarre and Sancho II the king of Castile, respectively. The Castilian Sancho was trying to retake Bureba and Alta Rioja, which his father had given away to king of Navarre and failed to retake. The Navarrese Sancho begged the aid of the Aragonese Sancho to defend his kingdom. Sancho of Castile defeated the two cousins and retook both Bureba and Alta Rioja, as well as Álava.

Sancho Ramírez followed his father's practice, not using the royal title early in his reign even though his state had become fully independent. This changed in 1076, when Sancho IV of Navarre was murdered by his own siblings, thus prompting a succession crisis in this neighboring kingdom that represented Aragon's nominal overlord. At first, the murdered king's young son, García, who had fled to Castile, was recognized as titular king by Alfonso VI, while Sancho Ramírez recruited to his side noblemen of Navarre who resented their kingdom falling under Alfonso's influence. The crisis was resolved by partition. Sancho Ramírez was elected King of Navarre, while he ceded previously contested western provinces of the kingdom to Alfonso. From this time, Sancho refers to himself as king not only of Navarre but also Aragon.

Sancho conquered Barbastro in 1064, Graus in 1083, and Monzón in 1089. He was defeated by El Cid, who was raiding his lands and those of his Muslim allies, at the Battle of Morella, probably in 1084. He perished in 1094 at the Siege of Huesca, supposedly from an arrow while inspecting the walls of the Muslim stronghold.

Sancho contracted his first marrige in c.1065, to Isabel (died c.1071), daughter of Count Armengol III of Urgel. They were divorced 1071. His second marriage, in 1076, was with Felicia (died 3 May 1123), daughter of Count Hilduin III of Roucy. A third marriage—to Philippa of Toulouse—is sometimes given,[1] but other evidence records him as still married to Felicia at the time of his death.[2] He was father of three sons: by Isabel, he had Peter, his successor; by Felicia he had Alfonso, who succeeded Peter, and Ramiro, who succeeded Alfonso.[3]


Sancho Ramírez (c. 1042 – 4 June 1094, Huesca) was king of Aragon (1063-1094, as Sancho I) and king of Navarre (1076-1094, as Sancho V). He was the son of Ramiro I of Aragon and Ermesinde of Bigorre, and he succeeded his father in 1063.

Between 1067 and 1068, the War of the Three Sanchos involved him in a conflict with his first cousins, both also named Sancho: Sancho IV the king of Navarre and Sancho II the king of Castile, respectively. The Castilian Sancho was trying to retake Bureba and Alta Rioja, which his father had given away to king of Navarre and failed to retake. The Navarrese Sancho begged the aid of the Aragonese Sancho to defend his kingdom. Sancho of Castile defeated the two cousins and retook both Bureba and Alta Rioja, as well as Álava.

Sancho Ramírez was elected king of Navarre in 1076 after Sancho IV of Navarre was murdered by his own siblings, thus prompting a succession crisis. Sancho's young son, García, was recognized as titular king in León and Castile, where he lived in exile.

Sancho conquered Barbastro in 1064, Graus in 1083, and Monzón in 1089.

He married first in c.1065 (divorced 1071), Isabel of Urgel (d. c.1071), daughter of Count Armengol III of Urgel and second in 1076, Felicie of Roucy (d May 3, 1123), daughter of Count Hilduin III of Roucy. A third marriage - to Philippa of Toulouse - is sometimes given [1] but other evidence records him as still married to Felicie at the time of his death.[2]

He perished in 1094 at the Siege of Huesca.

His three sons: by Isabel, he had Peter; by Felicie he had Alfonso and Ramiro. All three succeeded in turn to the throne of Aragon.

Sources

Acknowledgements

This person was created through the import of Acrossthepond.ged on 21 February 2011. The following data was included in the gedcom. You may wish to edit it for readability.



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Images: 2
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Sancho Ramirez de Aragón
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Collaboration

On 12 Jul 2014 at 18:21 GMT Sue Howard wrote:

Rey de Aragón y Navarra-1 and Ramirez-314 appear to represent the same person because: They sure have a lot of names! His mother is Erminsende Bigore aka Gerberge Foix.



Sancho is 25 degrees from George Bush, 31 degrees from Rick San Soucie and 21 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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