Constance Arles

Constance d' Arles (0974 - 1032)

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Constance d' Arles
Born in Arles, Francemap
Ancestors ancestors
Wife of — married before 25 Aug 1003 [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Melun, Seine-et-Marne, Ile-de-France, Francemap
Profile last modified 19 Feb 2019 | Created 24 Apr 2011
This page has been accessed 14,310 times.
European Aristocracy
Constance Arles was a member of aristocracy in Europe.
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Contents

Bio

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#GuillaumeIIArlesProvencedied993

Note that there is a great deal of confusion in public trees about her parentage, caused by the similarity of her parents' names and titles to those of William III Taillefer de Toulouse and his wife Arsinde d'Anjou. Her parents are William II Liberator d'Arles, son of Boson, and Adelaide d'Anjou, son of Fulk II.

Notes

Note N307Constance of Arles
, encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com
Constance of Arles (also known as Constance of Provence) (986 - Jul 25, 1034) was the third wife and queen of King Robert II of France. She was the daughter of William I, Count of Provence and great-grandson of Charles-Constantine; and Adelais of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou. She was the sister of Count William II of Provence.
In 1003, she was married to King Robert, after his divorce from his second wife, Bertha of Burgundy. The marriage was stormy; Bertha's family opposed her, and Constance was despised for importing her Provencal kinfolk. Robert's friend, Hugh of Beauvais, tried to convince the king to repudiate her in 1007. Constance's response was to have Beauvais murdered by the knights of her kinsman, Fulk Nerra. In 1010 Robert even went to Rome, accompanied by his former wife Bertha, to seek permission to divorce Constance and remarry Bertha. Constance encouraged her sons to revolt against their father, and then favoured her younger son, Robert, over her elder son, Henri.
During the famous trial of Herefast de Crepon (who was alleged to be involved with the Cathars) in 1022, the crowd outside the church in Orleans became so unruly that, according to Moore:
At the king's command, Queen Constance stood before the doors of the Church, to prevent the common people from killing them inside the Church, and they were expelled from the bosom of the Church. As they were being driven out, the queen struck out the eye of Stephen, who had once been her confessor, with the staff which she carried in her hand.
The symbolism, or reality, of putting an eye out is used often in medieval accounts to show the ultimate sin of breaking of one's oath, whether it be heresy, or treason to ones lordship, or in this case both. Stephen's eye was put out by the hand of a Queen weilding a staff (royal scepters were usually tipped with a cross) thus symbolically providing justice for the treasoned lord on earth and in heaven.
Constance and Robert had seven children:
Advisa, Countess of Auxerre, (c. 1003- after 1063). married Count Renaud I of Nevers
Hugh Magnus, co-king (1007 - September 17, 1025)
Henri (May 4, 1008 - August 4, 1060)
Adela, Countess of Contenance (1009 - June 5, 1063), married (1) Duke Richard III of Normandy (2) Count Baldwin V of Flanders
Robert I, Duke of Burgundy (1011 - March 21, 1076)
Eudes (1013 - 1056)
Constance (1014 - unknown), married Manasses de Dammartin
At Constance's urging, her eldest son Hugh Magnus was crowned co-king alongside his father in 1017. Hugh Magnus demanded his parents share power with him, and rebelled against his father in 1025. He died suddenly later that year, an exile and a fugitive. Robert and Constance quarrelled over which of their surviving sons should inherit the throne; Robert favored their second son Henri, while Constance favored their third son, Robert. Despite his mother's protests, Henry was crowned in 1027. Fulbert, bishop of Chartes wrote a letter claiming that he was " frightened away" from the consecration of Henry "by the savagery of his mother, who is quite trustworthy when she promises evil."
Constance encouraged her sons to rebel, and Henri and Robert began attacking and pillaging the towns and castles belonging to their father. Robert attacked Burgundy, the duchy he had been promised but had never recieved, and Henry seized Dreux. At last King Robert agreed to their demands and peace was made which lasted until the king's death.
King Robert died in 1031, and soon Constance was at odds with both her elder son, Henri, and her younger son Robert. Constance seized her dower lands and refused to surrender them. Henri fled to Normandy, where he recieved aid, weapons, and soldiers from his brother Robert. He returned to besiege his mother at Poissy, but Constance escaped to Pontoise. She only surrendered when Henri began the siege of Le Puiset and swore to slaughter all the inhabitants.
Constance died in 1034, and was buried beside her husband Robert at Saint-Denis Basilica.
Constance
Constance of Arles (also known as Constance of Provence) (986 - July 25, 1034) was the third wife and queen of King Robert II of France. She was the daughter of William I, count of Provence and great-grandson of Charles-Constantine; and Adelais of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou. She was the sister of Count William II of Provence.
In 1003, she was married to King Robert, after his divorce from his second wife, Bertha of Burgundy. The marriage was stormy; Bertha's family opposed her, and Constance was despised for importing her Provençal kinfolk. Robert's friend, Hugh of Beauvais, tried to convince the king to repudiate her in 1007. Constance's response was to have Beauvais murdered by the knights of her kinsman, Fulk Nerra. In 1010 Robert even went to Rome, accompanied by his former wife Bertha, to seek permission to divorce Constance and remarry Bertha. Constance encouraged her sons to revolt against their father, and then favored her younger son, Robert, over her elder son, Henri.
During the famous trial of Herefast de Crepon (who was alleged to be involved with the Cathars) in 1022, the crowd outside the church in Orleans became so unruly that, according to Moore:
At the king's command, Queen Constance stood before the doors of the Church, to prevent the common people from killing them inside the Church, and they were expelled from the bosom of the Church. As they were being driven out, the queen struck out the eye of Stephen, who had once been her confessor, with the staff which she carried in her hand.
The symbolism, or reality, of putting an eye out is used often in medieval accounts to show the ultimate sin of breaking of one's oath, whether it be heresy, or treason to ones lordship, or in this case both. Stephen's eye was put out by the hand of a Queen wielding a staff (royal scepters were usually tipped with a cross) thus symbolically providing justice for the treasoned lord on earth and in heaven.
Constance and Robert had seven children:
Advisa, Countess of Auxerre, (c.1003-after 1063), married Count Renaud I of Nevers
Hugh Magnus, co-king (1007-September 17, 1025)
Henri (May 4, 1008-August 4, 1060)
Adela, Countess of Contenance (1009-June 5, 1063), married (1) Duke Richard III of Normandy (2) Count Baldwin V of Flanders
Robert I, Duke of Burgundy (1011-March 21, 1076)
Eudes (1013-1056)
Constance (1014-unknown), married Manasses de Dammartin
At Constance's urging, her eldest son Hugh Magnus was crowned co-king alongside his father in 1017. Hugh Magnus demanded his parents share power with him, and rebelled against his father in 1025. He died suddenly later that year, an exile and a fugitive. Robert and Constance quarrelled over which of their surviving sons should inherit the throne; Robert favored their second son Henri, while Constance favored their third son, Robert. Despite his mother's protests, Henry was crowned in 1027. Fulbert, bishop of Chartres wrote a letter claiming that he was "frightened away" from the consecration of Henry "by the savagery of his mother, who is quite trustworthy when she promises evil."
Constance encouraged her sons to rebel, and Henri and Robert began attacking and pillaging the towns and castles belonging to their father. Robert attacked Burgundy, the duchy he had been promised but had never received, and Henry seized Dreux. At last King Robert agreed to their demands and peace was made which lasted until the king's death.
King Robert died in 1031, and soon Constance was at odds with both her elder son, Henri, and her younger son Robert. Constance seized her dower lands and refused to surrender them. Henri fled to Normandy, where he received aid, weapons, and soldiers from his brother Robert. He returned to besiege his mother at Poissy, but Constance escaped to Pontoise. She only surrendered when Henri began the siege of Le Puiset and swore to slaughter all the inhabitants.
Constance died in 1034, and was buried beside her husband Robert at Saint-Denis Basilica
Wikipedia biography of Robert II the Pious
Wikipedia: Robert II of France
The Excommunication of Robert the Pious by Jean-Paul Laurens.
Robert II (27 March 972 - 20 July 1031), called the Pious or the Wise, was King of France from 996 until his death. Second reigning member of the House of Capet, he was born in Orléans to Hugh Capet and Adelaide of Aquitaine.
Co-rule with fatherRobert II the PiousKing of the Franks (more...)
Reign As co-King: 30 December 987 - 24 October 996; as senior King: 24 October 996 - 20 July 1031
Coronation 30 December 987, Cathedral of Orléans
Titles Duke of Burgundy (1016)
Born 27 March 972(972--) Orléans, France
Died 20 July 1031 (aged 59) Melun, France Buried Saint Denis Basilica, Paris, France
Predecessor Hugh Capet
Successor Henry I
Consort
Rozala of Italy (c.937 - 1003)
Bertha of Burgundy
Constance of Arles (973 - 1034)
Issue
Hugh Magnus, Rex Filius (1007 - 1025)
Henry I (1008 - 1060)
Adela, Countess of Flanders (1009 - 1063)
Robert I, Duke of Burgundy (1011 - 1076)
Royal House
House of Capet Father Hugh Capet (c.940 - 996) Mother Adelaide of Aquitaine (952 - 1004)
Robert II dispenses alms to the poor: "Robert had a kindly feeling for the weak and poor" - from Guizot's A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times.
Immediately after his coronation, Robert's father Hugh began to push for the coronation of Robert. Hugh's own claimed reason was that he was planning an expedition against the Moorish armies harassing Borrel II of Barcelona, an invasion which never occurred, and that the stability of the country necessitated two kings should he die while on expedition.[1] Ralph Glaber, however, attributes Hugh's request to his old age and inability to contol the nobility.[2] Modern scholarship has largely imputed to Hugh the motive of establishing a dynasty against the pretension of electoral power on the part of the aristocracy, but this is not the typical view of contemporaries and even some modern scholar have been less sceptical of Hugh's "plan" to campaign in Spain.[3] Robert was eventually crowned on 30 December that same year.
Robert began to take on active royal duties with his father in the early 990s. In 991, he helped his father prevent the French bishops from trekking to Mousson in the Kingdom of Germany for a synod called by Pope John XV, with whom Hugh was then in disagreement. When Hugh died in 996, Robert continued to reign without any succession dispute.
Marital problems
Robert had married the daughter of Berengar II of Italy, Rozala (who took the name of Susannah upon becoming Queen), who was many years his senior, as early as 989. She was the widow of Arnulf II of Flanders, with whom she still had children, and their marriage was arranged by Hugh. Robert divorced her within a year of his father's death. He tried instead to marry Bertha, daughter of Conrad of Burgundy, around the time of his father's death. She was a widow of Odo I of Blois, but was also Robert's cousin. For this reason, Pope Gregory V refused to sanction the marriage and Robert was excommunicated. After long negotiations with Gregory's successor, Sylvester II, the marriage was annulled.
Finally, in 1001, Robert contracted his final and longest-lasting marriage: to Constance of Arles, the daughter of William I of Provence. She was an intriguing and ambitious woman, who made life miserable for her husband by encouraging her sons to revolt against their father.
Piety
Robert, however, despite his marital problems, was a very devout Roman Catholic, hence his sobriquet "the Pious." He was musically inclined, being a composer, chorister, and poet, and making his palace a place of religious seclusion, where he conducted the matins and vespers in his royal robes. However, to contemporaries, Robert's "piety", resulted from his lack of toleration for heretics: he harshly punished them.
Military career
The kingdom Robert inherited was not large, and in an effort to increase his power, he vigorously pursued his claim to any feudal lands which became vacant, which action usually resulted in war with a counter-claimant. In 1003, his invasion of the Duchy of Burgundy was thwarted and it would not be until 1016 that he was finally able to get the support of the Church and be recognized as Duke of Burgundy.
The pious Robert made few friends and many enemies, including his own sons: Hugh Magnus, Henry, and Robert. They turned against their father in a civil war over power and property. Hugh died in revolt in 1025. In a conflict with Henry and the younger Robert, King Robert's army was beaten and he retreated to Beaugency outside Paris, his capital. He died in the middle of the war with his sons on 20 July 1031 at Melun. He was interred with Constance in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by son Henry in both France and Burgundy.
Children
Robert had no children from his short-lived marriage to Susanna. His illegal marriage to Bertha gave him one stillborn son in 999, but only Constance gave him surviving children:[4]
Constance, married Manasses de Dammartin
Hedwig (or known as Advisa of Auxerre), married Renauld I, Count of Nevers on 25 January 1016 and had issues.
Hugh Magnus, co-king (1017-1025)
Henry I, successor
Robert, became Duke of Burgundy
Odo (1013-c.1056), who may have been mentally retarded and died after his brother's failed invasion of Normandy
Adela (d. 1079), married firstly Richard III of Normandy and secondly Baldwin V of Flanders.
Robert also left an illegitimate son: Rudolph, Bishop of Bourges.
Notes
^ Lewis, 908.
^ Ibid, 914.
^ Ibid, passim.
^ Foundation for Medieval Genealogy. Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
Sources
Lewis, Anthony W. "Anticipatory Association of the Heir in Early Capetian France." The American Historical Review, Vol. 83, No. 4. (Oct., 1978), pp 906-927.
* Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 53-21, 101-21, 107-20, 108-21, 128-21, 141-21, 141A-21, 146-19, 162-20, 185-2.
Jessee, W. Scott. A missing Capetian princess: Advisa, daughter of King Robert II of France (Medieval Prosopography), 1990
Constance of Provence
974 - 1032
Constance of Arles (also known as Constance of Provence) (986 - July 25, 1034) was the third wife and queen of King Robert II of France. She was the daughter of William I, count of Provence and great-grandson of Charles-Constantine; and Adelais of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou. She was the sister of Count William II of Provence.
In 1003, she was married to King Robert, after his divorce from his second wife, Bertha of Burgundy. The marriage was stormy; Bertha's family opposed her, and Constance was despised for importing her Provençal kinfolk. Robert's friend, Hugh of Beauvais, tried to convince the king to repudiate her in 1007. Constance's response was to have Beauvais murdered by the knights of her kinsman, Fulk Nerra. In 1010 Robert even went to Rome, accompanied by his former wife Bertha, to seek permission to divorce Constance and remarry Bertha. Constance encouraged her sons to revolt against their father, and then favored her younger son, Robert, over her elder son, Henri.
During the famous trial of Herefast de Crepon (who was alleged to be involved with the Cathars) in 1022, the crowd outside the church in Orleans became so unruly that, according to Moore:
At the king's command, Queen Constance stood before the doors of the Church, to prevent the common people from killing them inside the Church, and they were expelled from the bosom of the Church. As they were being driven out, the queen struck out the eye of Stephen, who had once been her confessor, with the staff which she carried in her hand.
The symbolism, or reality, of putting an eye out is used often in medieval accounts to show the ultimate sin of breaking of one's oath, whether it be heresy, or treason to ones lordship, or in this case both. Stephen's eye was put out by the hand of a Queen wielding a staff (royal scepters were usually tipped with a cross) thus symbolically providing justice for the treasoned lord on earth and in heaven.
Constance and Robert had seven children:
1. Advisa, Countess of Auxerre, (c.1003-after 1063), married Count Renaud I of Nevers
2. Hugh Magnus, co-king (1007-September 17, 1025)
3. Henri (May 4, 1008-August 4, 1060)
4. Adela, Countess of Contenance (1009-June 5, 1063), married (1) Duke Richard III of Normandy (2) Count Baldwin V of Flanders
5. Robert I, Duke of Burgundy (1011-March 21, 1076)
6. Eudes (1013-1056)
7. Constance (1014-unknown), married Manasses de Dammartin
At Constance's urging, her eldest son Hugh Magnus was crowned co-king alongside his father in 1017. Hugh Magnus demanded his parents share power with him, and rebelled against his father in 1025. He died suddenly later that year, an exile and a fugitive. Robert and Constance quarrelled over which of their surviving sons should inherit the throne; Robert favored their second son Henri, while Constance favored their third son, Robert. Despite his mother's protests, Henry was crowned in 1027. Fulbert, bishop of Chartres wrote a letter claiming that he was "frightened away" from the consecration of Henry "by the savagery of his mother, who is quite trustworthy when she promises evil."
Constance encouraged her sons to rebel, and Henri and Robert began attacking and pillaging the towns and castles belonging to their father. Robert attacked Burgundy, the duchy he had been promised but had never received, and Henry seized Dreux. At last King Robert agreed to their demands and peace was made which lasted until the king's death.
King Robert died in 1031, and soon Constance was at odds with both her elder son, Henri, and her younger son Robert. Constance seized her dower lands and refused to surrender them. Henri fled to Normandy, where he received aid, weapons, and soldiers from his brother Robert. He returned to besiege his mother at Poissy, but Constance escaped to Pontoise. She only surrendered when Henri began the siege of Le Puiset and swore to slaughter all the inhabitants.
Constance died in 1034, and was buried beside her husband Robert at Saint-Denis Basilica.
Constance
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Constance of Arles Queen consort of the Franks Tenure 1001-1031 Spouse Robert II of France Issue Hugh Magnus of France
Henry I of France
Adela of France, Countess of Flanders
Robert I, Duke of Burgundy House House of Capet Father William I, Count of Provence Mother Adelais of Anjou Born 986
Died 25 July 1034 (aged 47-48)
Constance of Arles (also known as Constance of Provence) (986 - 25 July 1034) was the third wife and queen of King Robert II of France. She was the daughter of William I, count of Provence and Adelais of Anjou, daughter of Fulk II of Anjou. She was the half-sister of Count William II of Provence.
Contents [hide]
1 Biography
2 Children
3 References
4 Sources
5 External links
// [edit] Biography
In 1003, she was married to King Robert, after his divorce from his second wife, Bertha of Burgundy. The marriage was stormy; Bertha's family opposed her, and Constance was despised for importing her Provençal kinfolk. Robert's friend, Hugh of Beauvais, tried to convince the king to repudiate her in 1007. Constance's response was to have Beauvais murdered by the knights of her kinsman, Fulk Nerra. In 1010 Robert even went to Rome, accompanied by his former wife Bertha, to seek permission to divorce Constance and remarry Bertha. Constance encouraged her sons to revolt against their father, and then favored her younger son, Robert, over her elder son, Henri.
During the famous trial of Herefast de Crepon (who was alleged to be involved with a heretical sect of canons, nuns, and clergy in 1022[1]), the crowd outside the church in Orleans became so unruly that, according to Moore:
At the king's command, Queen Constance stood before the doors of the Church, to prevent the common people from killing them inside the Church, and they were expelled from the bosom of the Church. As they were being driven out, the queen struck out the eye of Stephen, who had once been her confessor, with the staff which she carried in her hand.
The symbolism, or reality, of putting an eye out is used often in medieval accounts to show the ultimate sin of breaking of one's oath, whether it be heresy, or treason to ones lordship, or in this case both. Stephen's eye was put out by the hand of a Queen wielding a staff (royal scepters were usually tipped with a cross) thus symbolically providing justice for the treasoned lord on earth and in heaven.
At Constance's urging, her eldest son Hugh Magnus was crowned co-king alongside his father in 1017. Hugh Magnus demanded his parents share power with him, and rebelled against his father in 1025. He died suddenly later that year, an exile and a fugitive. Robert and Constance quarrelled over which of their surviving sons should inherit the throne; Robert favored their second son Henri, while Constance favored their third son, Robert. Despite his mother's protests, Henry was crowned in 1027. Fulbert, bishop of Chartres wrote a letter claiming that he was "frightened away" from the consecration of Henry "by the savagery of his mother, who is quite trustworthy when she promises evil."
Constance encouraged her sons to rebel, and Henri and Robert began attacking and pillaging the towns and castles belonging to their father. Robert attacked Burgundy, the duchy he had been promised but had never received, and Henry seized Dreux. At last King Robert agreed to their demands and peace was made which lasted until the king's death.
King Robert died in 1031, and soon Constance was at odds with both her elder son Henri and her younger son Robert. Constance seized her dower lands and refused to surrender them. Henri fled to Normandy, where he received aid, weapons and soldiers from his brother Robert. He returned to besiege his mother at Poissy but Constance escaped to Pontoise. She only surrendered when Henri began the siege of Le Puiset and swore to slaughter all the inhabitants.
Constance died in 1034, and was buried beside her husband Robert at Saint-Denis Basilica.
[edit] Children
Constance and Robert had seven children:
Advisa, Countess of Auxerre, (c.1003-after 1063), married Count Renaud I of Nevers
Hugh Magnus, co-king (1007-17 September 1025)
Henri (4 May 1008 - 4 August 1060)
Adela, Countess of Contenance (1009-5 June 1063), married (1) Duke Richard III of Normandy (2) Count Baldwin V of Flanders
Robert I, Duke of Burgundy (1011-21 March 1076)
Eudes (1013-1056)
Constance (1014-unknown), married Manasses de Dammartin
[edit] References
^ 1
"The heresy was sui generis, probably an amalgam of neoplatonic speculation and of inferences made from the search, familiar to biblical scholars of the time, for an inner meaning beneath the literal surface of the text of Scripture 'written on animal skins.' The radical nature of the denials of the adherents of the doctrines of incarnation and resurrection, have led some historians to argue that the heresy was imported, to some degree ready-made, and that it represents a fragmentary influence from the developed heretical tradition of the movement of the Bogomils, then spreading from its cradle-land in Bulgaria into other parts ... But the absence of any external evidence of Bogomil missionizing at this time and a wider realization of the number of factors in Western society which fostered dissisence in the eleventh century ... have caused the theory to lose support. What seems most likely is that the heresy was intellectual in origin and a facet of the reawakening of learning in the late tenth and early eleventh centuries." Malcolm Lambert, Medieval Heresy: Popular Movements from the Gregorian Reform to the Reformation (New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1991) 16 - 17.
[edit] Sources
Jessee, W. Scott. A missing Capetian princess: Advisa, daughter of King Robert II of France (Medieval Prosopography), 1990
Nolan, Kathleen D. Capetian Women, 2003.
Moore, R.I. The Birth of Popular Heresy, 1975.
Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 53-21, 101-21, 107-20, 108-21, 128-21, 141-21, 141A-21, 185-2.
Lambert, Malcolm. Medieval Heresy: Popular Movements from the Gregorian Reform to the Reformation, 1991, 9 - 17.

Sources

Source S-2024265482
Repository: #R-2024265400
Title: Royal and Noble Genealogical Data
Author: Brian Tompsett
Publication: Copyright 1994-2001, Version March 25, 2001
Note: Excellent
http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/GEDCOM.html,
Department of Computer Science,
University of Hull,
Hull, UK, HU6 7RX,
B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk
  • Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700; Fredrick Weis; Seventh Edition, 1992, 101-21; however he says 998 in 108-21.
  • WEB: "Ancestors/Descendants of Royal Lines" (Contributors: F. L. Jacquier (History of Charlemagne by Christian Settipani); L. Orlandini, Manuel Abranches de Soveral, Reynaud de Paysac, F.L. J P de Palmas (Aurejac et Tournemire; Frankish line; The Complete Peerage}, Jacquier (Genealogy of Lewis Carroll, Justin Swanstrom, The Royal Families of England Scotland & Wales by Burkes Peerage; Debrett's Peerage & Baronage; Table of descendants French Canadian Genealogical Society; Families of Monfort-sur-Risle & Bertrand de Bricquebec; The Dukes of Normandy, XXXXI), A. Brabant ("Dynastie Montmorency, Michel d'Herbigny), Paul Leportier, Claude Barret, H.R. Moser (Burke Peerage), O.Guionneau, L.B. de Rouge, E. Polti, N. Danican (Britain's Royal Families; Buthlaw, Succession of Strathclyde, the Armorial 1961-62) A.Terlinden (Genealogy of the existing British Peerage, 1842), L. Gustavsson, C. Cheneaux, E. Lodge, S. Bontron (Brian Tompsett), R. Dewkinandan, H. de la Villarmois, C. Donadello; Scevole de Livonniere, H. de la Villarmois, I. Flatmoen, P. Ract Madoux (History of Morhange; Leon Maujean; Annuaire de Lorraine, 1926; La Galissonniere: Elections d'Arques et Rouen), Jean de Villoutreys (ref: Georges Poull), E. Wilkerson-Theaux (Laura Little), O. Auffray, A. Brabant (Genealogy of Chauvigny of Blot from "Chanoine Prevost Archiviste du Diocese de Troyes Union Typographique Domois Cote-d'Or 1925), Emmanuel Arminjon (E Levi-Provencal Histoire de l'Espagne Andalouse), Y. Gazagnes-Gazanhe, R. Sekulovich and J.P. de Palmas ("notes pierfit et iconographie Insecula", Tournemire), H de Riberolles (Base Tournemire), Franck Veillon; ,(Histoire Généalogique de la Maison de Hornes, Bruxelles 1848; Notice Historique Sur L'Ancien Comté de Hornes, Gand 1850; Europäische Stammtafeln, Marburg 1978); E.Driant / "La Maison de Damas" par Hubert Lamant, 1977 (Bibliothèque municipale d'Eaubonne)

........... http://geneastar.org.

Links

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On 8 Mar 2013 at 12:36 GMT Roger Travis Jr. wrote:

Also in the bio:

Her father's head-entry, read down to find Constance:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/PROVENCE.htm#GuillaumeIIArlesProvencedied993

Note that there is a great deal of confusion in public trees about her parentage, caused by the similarity of her parents' names and titles to those of William III Taillefer de Toulouse and his wife Arsinde d'Anjou. Her parents are William II Liberator d'Arles, son of Boson, and Adelaide d'Anjou, son of Fulk II.

Constance is 37 degrees from Lizzie Griffiths, 31 degrees from Fred Rogers and 16 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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