John Armstrong Jr.

John Long Armstrong Jr. (1758 - 1843)

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Sen. John Long Armstrong Jr.
Born in Carlisle, Lancaster, Pennsylvaniamap
Ancestors ancestors
[spouse(s) unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Red Hook, Dutchess, New York, United Statesmap
Profile last modified | Created 10 May 2014
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Categories: Rhinebeck Cemetery, Rhinebeck, New York | Continental Congress | US Senators from New York | US Secretaries of War | US Ambassadors to France | American Revolution | Newburgh, New York | Newburgh Conspiracy | This Day In History April 01 | This Day In History November 25 | American Notables.

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Sen. John Armstrong Jr. participated in the American Revolution
Preceded by
6th Secretary
William Eustis




Preceded by
John Laurance




Preceded by
DeWitt Clinton


Preceded by
Theodorus Bailey
John Armstrong Jr.
7th United States
Secretary of War
Dept of War
1813—1814

US Senator (Class 3)
from New York
[1]
1800—1802
Seal of the US Senate
US Senator (Class 3)
from New York

1803—1804

US Senator (Class 1)
from New York
[2]
1804

Succeeded by
8th Secretary
James Monroe




Succeeded by
DeWitt Clinton




Succeeded by
John Smith


Succeeded by
Samuel L. Mitchill

Contents

Biography

Early life

Armstrong was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the younger son of General John Armstrong and Rebecca (Lyon) Armstrong. John Armstrong, Sr., was a renowned Pennsylvania soldier born in Ireland of Scottish descent. John Jr.'s older brother was James Armstrong, who became a physician and U.S. Congressman. After early education in Carlisle, John Jr. studied at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). He broke off his studies in Princeton in 1775 to return to Pennsylvania and join the fight in the Revolutionary War. His service record is sometimes confused with several other John Armstrongs in the war, including his father.

Revolutionary War

The young Armstrong initially joined a Pennsylvania militia regiment and the following year he was appointed as aide-de-camp to General Hugh Mercer of the Continental Army. In this role, he carried the wounded and dying General Mercer from the field at the Battle of Princeton. After the General died on January 12, 1777, Armstrong became an aide to General Horatio Gates. He stayed with Gates through the Battle of Saratoga then resigned due to problems with his health.
In 1782 Gates asked him to return. Armstrong joined General Gates' staff as an aide with the rank of major, which he held through the rest of the war.

The Newburgh letters

While in camp with Gates at Newburgh, New York, Armstrong became involved in the Newburgh Conspiracy. He is generally acknowledged as the author of the two anonymous letters, directed at the officers in the camp. The first, titled "An Address to the Officers" (dated March 10, 1783), called for a meeting to discuss back pay and other grievances with the Congress and form a plan of action. After George Washington ordered the meeting canceled and called for a milder meeting on March 15, a second address appeared that claimed that this showed that Washington supported their actions. Washington successfully defused this protest without a mutiny. While some of Armstrong's later correspondence acknowledged his role, there was never any official action that connected him with the anonymous letters.

After The Revolution

Later in 1783 Armstrong returned home to Carlisle. He was named the Adjutant General of Pennsylvania's militia and also served as Secretary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania under Presidents Dickinson and Franklin. In 1787 and 1788 he was sent as a delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress. The Congress offered to make him chief justice of the Northwest Territory. He declined this, as well as all other public offices for the next dozen years.
In 1789, Armstrong married Alida Livingston (1761–1822); the sister of Chancellor Robert R. Livingston and Edward Livingston. One of their daughters, Margaret, married William Backhouse Astor, Sr. of the wealthy Astor family. John Armstrong moved to New York and took up life as a gentleman farmer on a farm purchased from her family in Dutchess County.
Armstrong resumed public life after the resignation of John Laurance as U.S. Senator from New York. As a Jefferson Republican he was elected in November 1800 to a term ending in March 1801. He took his seat on January 8, and was re-elected on January 27 for a full term (1801–07), but resigned on February 5, 1802. DeWitt Clinton was elected to fill the vacancy, but resigned in 1803, and Armstrong was appointed temporarily to his old seat.
In February 1804, Armstrong was elected again to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Theodorus Bailey, thus moving from the Class 3 to the Class 1 seat on February 25, but served only four months before President Jefferson appointed him U.S. Minister to France. He served in that post until 1810, and also represented the United States at the court of Spain in 1806.
When the War of 1812 broke out, Armstrong was called to military service. He was commissioned as a Brigadier General, and placed in charge of the defenses for the port of New York. Then in 1813 President Madison named him Secretary of War.
Henry Adams wrote of him:
In spite of Armstrong's services, abilities, and experience, something in his character always created distrust. He had every advantage of education, social and political connection, ability and self-confidence; he was only fifty-four years old, which was also the age of Monroe; but he suffered from the reputation of indolence and intrigue. So strong was the prejudice against him that he obtained only eighteen votes against fifteen in the Senate on his confirmation; and while the two senators from Virginia did not vote at all, the two from Kentucky voted in the negative. Under such circumstances, nothing but military success of the first order could secure a fair field for Monroe's rival.
Armstrong made a number of valuable changes to the armed forces but was so convinced that the British would not attack Washington that he did nothing to defend the city even when it became clear it was the objective of the invasion force. After the destruction of Washington, Madison, usually a forgiving man, forced him to resign in September 1814.

Junior John Long Armstrong. [3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21]

Born 28 NOV 1758. Carlisle, Pennsylvania. [22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32]

Died 01 APR 1843. Red Hook, New York. [33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41]

Event: Arrival 1812 New York, New York. [42] (null) BET 1813 AND 1814. Secretary of War. (null) BET 1804 AND 1810. Secretary of War and Minister to France. (null) served under General Gates in Campaign against Burgoyne. (null) 21 MAR 1813. sent letter to Robert Swartwout. (null) Rokeby (null) "young General". (null) BET 1800 AND 1804. New York senator. (null) 06 JUL 1812. Brigadier General of New York.

Buried family vault Rhinebeck Cemetery. Rhinebeck, Dutchess, New York, United States. [43]

Residence United States. [44] United States. [45] United States. [46] United States. [47] United States. [48] 1800 Rhinbeck, Dutchess, New York. [49] 1790 Phillipstown, Dutchess, New York, United States. [50] 1830 Dutchess, New York, United States. [51] 1820 Dutchess, New York, United States. [52] 1840 Baltimore, Maryland, United States. [53]

Note: #N666.

Marriage Husband Junior John Long Armstrong. Wife @I443@. Child: Maj Horatio Robert Gates Armstrong. Marriage 19 JAN 1789. Linlithgo, Columbia, New York, USA. [54]

Notes

Note N653http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=handybkaa&h=56&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N654http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=usbijtb1890&h=2357&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N655http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=sarmemberapps&h=943802&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N656http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=sarmemberapps&h=1083702&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N657http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=sarmemberapps&h=1083713&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N658http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=sarmemberapps&h=448451&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N659http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=websearch-3905&h=29742&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N660http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=1840usfedcenancestry&h=3526169&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N661http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=1840usfedcenancestry&h=3526171&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N662http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=1820usfedcenancestry&h=471790&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N663http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=1830usfedcenancestry&h=49749&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N664http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=1790usfedcen&h=251144&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N665http://trees.ancestry.comrd?f=sse&db=1800usfedcenancestry&h=221883&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt. 1

Note N666John Armstrong, Jr.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

John Armstrong.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

7th United States Secretary of War.

In office.

January 13, 1813 ? September 27, 1814.

President James Madison.

Preceded by William Eustis.

Succeeded by James Monroe.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Born November 25, 1758.

Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

Died April 1, 1843.

Red Hook, New York.

John Armstrong, Jr. (November 25, 1758 ? April 1, 1843) was an American soldier and statesman who was a delegate to the Continental Congress, U.S. Senator from New York, and Secretary of War. Jr. was the son of Dr. John Armstrong and Rebecca (Lyon) Armstrong and was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania in 1758. After early education in Carlisle he studied at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). He broke off his studies in Princeton in 1775 to return to Pennsylvania and join the fight in the Revolutionary War.

Contents [hide].

1 Revolutionary War.

1.1 Newburgh letters.

2 After the Revolution.

3 Later life.

4 Further reading.

5 External links.

[edit] Revolutionary War.

The Young Armstrong joined a Pennsylvania militia regiment, but the following year became an aide to General Hugh Mercer in the Continental Army. In this role, he carried to wounded and dying General Mercer from the field at the Battle of Princeton. After the general died on January 12, 1777, Armstrong became an aide to General Horatio Gates. He stayed with Gates through the Battle of Saratoga then resigned due to problems with his health. In 1782 Gates asked him to return. Armstong joined General Gates' staff as an aide with the rank of Major which he held through the rest of the war.

[edit] Newburgh letters.

While in camp with Gates at Newburgh, New York, Armstrong became involved in the Newburgh Conspiracy. He is generally acknowledged as the author of the two anonymous letters directed at the officers in the camp. The first, titled "An Address to the Officers" (dated March 10, 1783), called for a meeting to discuss back pay and other grievances with the Congress and form a plan of action. After General Washington ordered the meeting canceled and called for a milder meeting on March 15th, a second address appeared that claimed that this showed that Washington supported their actions.

Washington successfully defused this protest without a mutiny. While some of Armstrong's later correspondence acknowledged his role, there was never any official action that connected him with the anonymous letters.

[edit] After the Revolution.

Later in 1783 Armstrong returned home to Carlisle. He was named the Adjutant General of Pennsylvania's militia and also served as Secretary of State for Pennsylvania under Presidents Dickinson and Franklin. In 1787 and 1788 he was sent as a delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress. The Congress offered to make him chief justice of the Northwest Territory. He declined this, as well as all other public offices for the next dozen years.

In 1789 Armstrong married Alida Livingston of the New York political family, and the sister of Robert Livingston. One of their daughters, Margaret, married William Backhouse Astor, Sr. of the wealthy Astor family. John Armstrong moved to New York and took up life as a gentleman farmer on a farm purchased from her family in Dutchess County.

Armstrong resumed public life in August of 1800 when John Laurance resigned from the United States Senate. Placed on the ballot as a Jefferson Republican he was elected to term ending in 1802. That year he was re-elected for a full term, but served only until February 5, 1802 when he resigned. was returned to the Senate in 1804 after Theodorus Bailey resigned, but served only four months before President Jefferson named him minister to France. He served in that post until 1810, and also represented the United States at the court of Spain in 1806.

When the War of 1812 broke out, Armstrong was called to military service. He was commissioned as a Brigadier General, and placed in charge of the defenses for the port of New York. Then in 1813 President Madison named him Secretary of War. He made a number of valuable changes to the armed forces, but was forced to resign in September of 1814 after he was blamed for the Burning of Washington in August.

[edit] Later life.

Armstrong returned to his farm and resumed a quiet life. He published a number of histores, biographies, and some woks on agriculture. He died at home in Red Hook, New York in 1843 and is buried in the cemetery in Rhinebeck.

Armstrong's farm in Dutchess County is still operating (and owned by the Livingston family). The home he completed in 1811 has a New York state educational marker on County Road 103.

Brother of Congressman James Armstrong.

[edit] Further reading.

Skeen, Carl E.; John Armstrong, Jr., 1758?1843: A Biography; 1982, Syracuse Univ Press; ISBN 0-8156-2242-2.

[edit] External links.

Armstrong?s Congressional biography.

Armstrong's Portrait by Charles Willson Peale.

Profile page for John Armstrong, Jr. on the Find A Grave web site.

Preceded by.

John Laurance United States Senator (Class 3) from New York.

1800?1802

Served alongside: Gouverneur Morris Succeeded by.

DeWitt Clinton.

Preceded by.

DeWitt Clinton United States Senator (Class 3) from New York.

1803?1804

Served alongside: Theodorus Bailey Succeeded by.

John Smith.

Preceded by.

Theodorus Bailey United States Senator (Class 1) from New York.

1804

Served alongside: John Smith Succeeded by.

Samuel Mitchill.

Preceded by.

Robert R. Livingston U.S. Minister to France.

1804?1810 Succeeded by.

Joel Barlow.

Preceded by.

William Eustis United States Secretary of War.

1813?1814 Succeeded by.

James Monroe.

[show]v ? d ? eUnited States Senators from New York.

Class 1: Schuyler ? Burr ? Schuyler ? Hobart ? North ? Watson ? Morris ? Bailey ? Armstrong ? Mitchill ? German ? Sanford ? Van Buren ? Dudley ? Tallmadge ? Dickinson ? Fish ? P. King ? Morgan ? Fenton ? Kernan ? Platt ? Miller ? Hiscock ? Murphy ? Depew ? O'Gorman ? Calder ? Copeland ? Mead ? Ives ? Keating ? Kennedy ? Goodell ? Buckley ? Moynihan ? H. Clinton. 3: R. King ? Laurance ? Armstrong ? D. Clinton ? Armstrong ? Smith ? R. King ? Sanford ? Marcy ? Wright ? Foster ? Dix ? Seward ? Harris ? Conkling ? Lapham ? Evarts ? Hill ? Platt ? Root ? Wadsworth ? Wagner ? Dulles ? Lehman ? Javits ? D'Amato ? Schumer.

[show]v ? d ? eUnited States Secretaries of War.

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Retrieved from "http:/en.wikipedia.org/wikiJohn_Armstrong%2C_Jr.".

Categories: 1758 births | 1843 deaths | Continental Congressmen | United States Secretaries of War | United States Senators from New York | American people of the War of 1812.

This page was last modified 18:44, 27 September 2007. All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. (See Copyrights for details.).

For other men with this name, see John Armstrong (disambiguation).

John Armstrong (October 13, 1717 ? March 9, 1795) was an American civil engineer and soldier who served as a major general in the Revolutionary War. He was a delegate to the Continental Congress for Pennsylvania.

Contents [hide].

1 Early life.

2 Indian wars.

3 American Revolution.

4 Later life.

5 External links.

[edit] Early life.

Armstrong was born on October 13, 1717, in Brookeborough, County Fermanagh, Ireland to James Armstrong and Jane Campbell. He is a direct descendant of Johnnie Armstrong, the famous Scottish border outlaw. John was educated in Ireland and became a civil engineer before emigrating to Pennsylvania. Armstrong came to Pennsylvania as a surveyor for the Penn family, who owned the colony. In 1750 he laid out the first plat or plan for the town of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and was one of its first settlers. He was later appointed surveyor for the newly established Cumberland County.

[edit] Indian wars.

During the French and Indian War, a combined force of Delaware (Lenape) Indians and Frenchmen attacked and sacked Fort Granville (near present-day Lewistown) in June 1756, taking a number of prisoners back along the Kittanning Path to the their fortified village of Kittanning on the Allegheny River (present-day Kittanning, Pennsylvania). Governor John Penn ordered provincial troops stationed in Cumberland County to respond. Colonel Armstrong led the Kittanning Expedition, a bold raid deep into hostile territory that destroyed Kittanning on 8 September 1756. The action earned Armstrong life-long fame as the "Hero of Kittanning.".

In 1758, Colonel Armstrong led 2,700 Pennsylvania provincial troops on the Forbes Expedition, the approach of which compelled the French to vacate and blow up Fort Duquesne. Armstrong became a good friend to the other militia commander in this expedition, Colonel George Washington.

[edit] American Revolution.

In the early stages of the Revolutionary War, Armstrong was a brigadier general in the Pennsylvania militia. On March 1, 1776, the Congress appointed him to that same rank in the Continental Army. He was sent south to begin preparations for the defense of Charleston, South Carolina. He contributed his engineering talents to the construction of defenses that enabled them to withstand the Siege of Charleston later that year. When General Charles Lee arrived to take command, he returned to his duties with the main army and with the Pennsylvania militia. Pennsylvania named him Major General in charge of the state militia. This ended his service in the Continental Army, but not the war or his cooperation with General Washington.

At the Battle of Brandywine on September 11, 1777, Armstrong's militia held the far left of the American line. They were also to guard the Army's supplies. After a hard day's fighting the Americans were forced to withdraw or face being surrounded. Armstrong brought the supplies and his militia out from Pyle's Ford after dark.

In the Battle of Germantown on October 2, General Armstrong led the American right. His mission was to skirt the British left flank and attack there and in their rear. Despite delays and the troubles some units had in moving, the i haveaids going well, until the center was held up at the Chew House. Then it collapsed after a fog inspired friendly fire incident in which General Adam Stephen's men fired on Anthony Wayne's troops causing their withdrawal. Armstrong, whose men had advanced nearly to the center of Germantown, but were not greatly involved in the fight later complained that it was "....a glorious victory fought for and eight tenths won, ....mysteriously lost, for to this moment no one man can ....give any good reason for the flight.".

After Germantown, Armstrong was granted permission to give up active command. His health, at sixty, was not what it had been, and old wounds were troubling him. Returning home to Carlisle, he was elected to the Continental Congress by the Pennsylvania Assembly. As a delegate from 1777 to 1780 he was a strong supporter of Washington and the Army. Armstrong was firm in his support for a new United States Constitution, and was returned to the Congress during its final days in 1787 and 1788.

[edit] Later life.

Throughout his life Armstrong served in a number of local or civic offices. One of these, the Carlisle school board, led him to originally oppose Dr. Benjamin Rush's proposal to start a college in the town. He later relented, and became a member of the first Board of Trustees for Dickinson College. John died at home in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on March 9, 1795, and is buried in the Old Carlisle Cemetery. In 1800, when Pennsylvania created a new county at Kittanning, it was named Armstrong County in his honor. His son, John Armstrong, Jr. also served in the Army and the Congress.

[edit] External links.

Armstrong's Congressional Biography.

Profile page for John Armstrong, Sr. on the Find A Grave web site.

Retrieved from "http:/en.wikipedia.org/wikiJohn_Armstrong".

Categories: 1717 births | 1795 deaths | Continental Army generals | Continental Congressmen | Militia generals in the American Revolution | People of the French and Indian War | People from County Fermanagh | Pennsylvania colonial people | People of Pennsylvania in the American Revolution | People of Pontiac's Rebellion.

This page was last modified 03:51, 14 October 2007. All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. (See Copyrights for details.).

Rokeby, near Barrytown, was built by Chancellor?s sister, Alida, and her husband, Gen. John Armstrong. Armstrong followed Chancellor Livingston as Thomas Jefferson?s ambassador to France and served as James Madison?s secretary of war during the War of 1812. Another sister, Gertrude, built Staatsburg House (now Mills Mansion State Historic Site) with her husband, Morgan Lewis, New York?s third governor. Another museum property, Wilderstein in Rhinebeck, was built by descendants of another of Chancellor Livingston?s sisters, Margaret Livingston Tillotson.

Death

Armstrong returned to his farm and resumed a quiet life. He published a number of histories, biographies, and some works on agriculture. He died at La Bergerie (later renamed Rokeby), the farm estate he built in Red Hook, New York in 1843 and is buried in the cemetery in Rhinebeck. Armstrong's farm in Dutchess County is still operating (and owned by the Livingston family). The home he completed in 1811 has a New York state educational marker on County Road 103.

Letters & Documents

Letter to John Armstrong, Jr. from Thomas Jefferson

TO THE U. S. MINISTER TO FRANCE (JOHN ARMSTRONG.)

j. mss. Washington, May 2, 1808

Dear General, —A safe conveyance offering by a special messenger to Paris, I avail myself of it to bring up my arrears to my foreign correspondents. I give them the protection of your cover, but to save the trouble of your attention to their distribution, I give them an inner cover to Mr. Warden, whose attentions heretofore have encouraged me to ask this favor of him. But should he not be with you, I must pray you to open my packages to him, & have them distributed, as it is of importance that some of them should be delivered without delay. I shall say nothing to you on the subject of our foreign relations, because you will get what is official on that subject from Mr. Madison.

During the present paroxysm of the insanity of Europe, we have thought it wisest to break off all intercourse with her. We shall, in the course of this year, have all our seaports, of any note, put into a state of defense against naval attack. Against great land armies we cannot attempt it but by equal armies. For these we must depend on a classified militia, which will give us the service of the class from 20 to 26, in the nature of conscripts, composing a body of about 250,000, to be specially trained. This measure, attempted at a former session, was pressed at the last, and might, I think, have been carried by a small majority. But considering that great innovations should not be forced on a slender majority, and seeing that the general opinion is sensibly rallying to it, it was thought better to let it lie over to the next session, when, I trust, it will be passed. Another measure has now twice failed, which I have warmly urged, the immediate settlement by donation of lands, of such a body of militia in the territories of Orleans & Mississippi, as will be adequate to the defense of New Orleans. We are raising some regulars in addition to our present force, for garrisoning our seaports, & forming a nucleus for the militia to gather to. There will be no question who is to be my successor. Of this be assured, whatever may be said by newspapers and private correspondences. Local considerations have been silenced by those dictated by the continued difficulties of the times. One word of friendly request: be more frequent & full in your communications with us. I salute you with great friendship and respect.

Sources

  1. Resigned, vacant February 5, 1802 – February 23, 1802 when successor elected.
  2. Resigned to become U.S. Minister to France, vacant June 30, 1804 – November 23, 1804 when successor elected.
  3. Source: #S227 Birth date: November 25, 1758, Carlisle, Pennsylvania Birth place: Death date: April 1, 1848, Red Hook, New York Death place: Note: #N653
  4. Source: #S228 Birth date: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, About 1758 Birth place: Death date: 1843 Death place: Note: #N654
  5. Source: #S272 Year: 1840; Census Place: District 2, Baltimore, Maryland; Roll: ; Page: . Birth date: abt 1757 Birth place: Residence date: 1840 Residence place: Baltimore, Maryland, United States Note: #N660
  6. Source: #S272 Year: 1840; Census Place: District 2, Baltimore, Maryland; Roll: ; Page: . Birth date: abt 1757 Birth place: Residence date: 1840 Residence place: Baltimore, Maryland, United States Note: #N661
  7. Source: #S241 Year: 1820; Census Place: , Dutchess, New York; Roll: M33_71; Page: ; Image: . Residence date: 1820 Residence place: Dutchess, New York, United States Note: #N662
  8. Source: #S242 Year: 1830; Census Place: , Dutchess, New York; Roll: ; Page: . Residence date: 1830 Residence place: Dutchess, New York, United States Note: #N663
  9. Source: #S1 Year: 1790; Census Place: Phillipstown, Dutchess, New York; Roll: ; Image: Residence date: 1790 Residence place: Phillipstown, Dutchess, New York, United States Note: #N664
  10. Source: #S195 Year: 1800; Census Place: Rhinbeck, Dutchess, New York; Roll: ; Page: ; Image: . Residence date: 1800 Residence place: Rhinbeck, Dutchess, New York Note: #N665
  11. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook, New York Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N655
  12. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1748 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N656
  13. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N657
  14. Source: #S77 Birth date: 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N658
  15. Source: #S358 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Note: #N659
  16. Source: #S15 Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots; Volume: 1; Serial: 6924; Volume: 14
  17. Source: #S922
  18. Source: #S794
  19. Source: #S408 Place: New York, New York; Year: 1812; Page Number: 61
  20. Source: #S256
  21. Source: #S348
  22. Source: #S227 Birth date: November 25, 1758, Carlisle, Pennsylvania Birth place: Death date: April 1, 1848, Red Hook, New York Death place: Note: #N653
  23. Source: #S228 Birth date: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, About 1758 Birth place: Death date: 1843 Death place: Note: #N654
  24. Source: #S272 Year: 1840; Census Place: District 2, Baltimore, Maryland; Roll: ; Page: . Birth date: abt 1757 Birth place: Residence date: 1840 Residence place: Baltimore, Maryland, United States Note: #N660
  25. Source: #S272 Year: 1840; Census Place: District 2, Baltimore, Maryland; Roll: ; Page: . Birth date: abt 1757 Birth place: Residence date: 1840 Residence place: Baltimore, Maryland, United States Note: #N661
  26. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook, New York Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N655
  27. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1748 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N656
  28. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N657
  29. Source: #S77 Birth date: 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N658
  30. Source: #S358 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Note: #N659
  31. Source: #S794
  32. Source: #S408 Place: New York, New York; Year: 1812; Page Number: 61
  33. Source: #S227 Birth date: November 25, 1758, Carlisle, Pennsylvania Birth place: Death date: April 1, 1848, Red Hook, New York Death place: Note: #N653
  34. Source: #S228 Birth date: Carlisle, Pennsylvania, About 1758 Birth place: Death date: 1843 Death place: Note: #N654
  35. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook, New York Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N655
  36. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1748 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N656
  37. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N657
  38. Source: #S77 Birth date: 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N658
  39. Source: #S358 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Note: #N659
  40. Source: #S794
  41. Source: #S348
  42. Source: #S408 Place: New York, New York; Year: 1812; Page Number: 61
  43. Source: #S794
  44. Source: #S77 Birth date: 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N658
  45. Source: #S77 Birth date: 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N658
  46. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N657
  47. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1748 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N656
  48. Source: #S77 Birth date: 25 Nov 1758 Birth place: Carlisle, Pennsylvania Death date: 1 Apr 1843 Death place: Red Hook, New York Residence date: Residence place: United States Note: #N655
  49. Source: #S195 Year: 1800; Census Place: Rhinbeck, Dutchess, New York; Roll: ; Page: ; Image: . Residence date: 1800 Residence place: Rhinbeck, Dutchess, New York Note: #N665
  50. Source: #S1 Year: 1790; Census Place: Phillipstown, Dutchess, New York; Roll: ; Image: Residence date: 1790 Residence place: Phillipstown, Dutchess, New York, United States Note: #N664
  51. Source: #S242 Year: 1830; Census Place: , Dutchess, New York; Roll: ; Page: . Residence date: 1830 Residence place: Dutchess, New York, United States Note: #N663
  52. Source: #S241 Year: 1820; Census Place: , Dutchess, New York; Roll: M33_71; Page: ; Image: . Residence date: 1820 Residence place: Dutchess, New York, United States Note: #N662
  53. Source: #S272 Year: 1840; Census Place: District 2, Baltimore, Maryland; Roll: ; Page: . Birth date: abt 1757 Birth place: Residence date: 1840 Residence place: Baltimore, Maryland, United States Note: #N660
  54. Source: #S922
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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with John by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with John:

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Images: 6
John Long Armstrong, Jr. by John Vanderlyn, c. 1809
John Long Armstrong, Jr. by John Vanderlyn, c. 1809

Alida & John Armstrong,
Alida & John Armstrong,

John & Alida Armstrong crypt closeup
John & Alida Armstrong crypt closeup

Daguerreotype of John Armstrong, Jr. - c. 1840
Daguerreotype of John Armstrong, Jr. - c. 1840

Maj. John Armstrong
Maj. John Armstrong

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Collaboration

On 19 Aug 2018 at 20:43 GMT Michael Kerley wrote:

I was told by a very experienced genealogist that middle names were not used in America until late in the 16th century (after forefathers)...??? No way found to confirm...

Also, "Jr" was not implemented until late 18th century (again, haven't been able to confirm).

On 10 May 2017 at 21:17 GMT Jayme (McClary) Hart wrote:

Armstrong-9893 and Armstrong-4429 appear to represent the same person because: Clear duplicate. Son also being merged.

On 29 Apr 2017 at 20:21 GMT John Charles Waters wrote:

Armstrong-9893 and Armstrong-4429 are not ready to be merged because: John Armstrong, Jr. did not have a middle name. John Armstrong, Jr. was a Brig. General in the Continental Army, Secretary of War under President James Madison and a Senator from Pennsylvania. I believe his highest title should be discussed. He is noted as Sen., but he is mostly known as Brig. General. I would think Secretary of War may be his highest title.

On 29 Apr 2017 at 19:34 GMT Aaron Gullison wrote:

Armstrong-9893 and Armstrong-4429 appear to represent the same person because: Clear duplicate

On 5 Nov 2016 at 17:19 GMT Jayme (McClary) Hart wrote:

Armstrong-8494 and Armstrong-4429 appear to represent the same person because: Clear duplicate. Merge for father has been initiated.

On 29 Jun 2016 at 22:13 GMT Elizabeth Winter wrote:

Armstrong-8126 and Armstrong-4429 appear to represent the same person because: Can't imagine why this merge was rejected previously. Perhaps there's been profile improvement in the meantime? Seems like should have been Unmerged Match in that case. Oh well: Go with Lyon-1294 for the mother on the merge - she's the duplicate with the lower numbered profile. (Father is already merged.)



John is 19 degrees from Robin Helstrom, 23 degrees from Katy Jurado and 9 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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