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Pierre Arseneau (abt. 1676 - aft. 1735)

Pierre Arseneau aka Arsenault, Arsenaut
Born about in Port Royal, Acadie, Nouvelle-Francemap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married about 1697 [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died after at about age 59 in Isle St-Jean, Acadie, Nouvelle-Francemap
Profile last modified | Created 17 Dec 2011
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Biography

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Pierre Arseneau, carrying his father's name, was born about 1676 in the Port Royal district of Acadie.[1][2][3] He is the first-born of the two children that Pierre Arseneau had with his first wife, Marguerite Dugas. The father remarried around 1685, when Pierre and his younger brother Abraham were still children. The family moved to Beaubassin. [4] Their stepmother was Marie Guérin, who gave birth to 7 offspring with Pierre the father.[5]

Pierre, this son, married Anne Marie Boudrot in about 1697. (Their first child was 2 in 1700, thus born in 1698, so Anne would have likely become pregnant in 1697, probably soon after marriage). They almost surely wed in Beaubassin, which is where Pierre had lived with his parents since at least 1693 and where he had established his own household by 1698.[6]

Their first child was born later in 1698 as he was already 2 in their census reading of 1700.[7]. Another boy followed quickly, with Anne apparently arriving after 1702 as no daughters were included in that census.[8]. They lived next door to his parents and his older brother as noted in their order of listing in 1707.[9] The final census for that area records 7 children.[10] The couple would eventually have 10 children:[1][11]

Pierre b. c. 1699
Charles, b. c. 1702
Anne, b. after 1702
Jean, b. after 1707 census
François (known as “P’tit François”), b. c. 1710
Marguerite, b. c.1712
Marie Madeleine, b. c. 1714
Joseph (nicknamed “Bernech”), b.c.1716
Abraham, b, 12 Mar 1719
Antoine b. c. 1724

"Pierre, l'aîné de tous les enfants de l'ancêtre, a eu de son mariage avec Marie-Anne Boudrot, fille de Jean Boudrot et de Marguerite Bourgeois, dix enfants..."[12]

In 1728, Pierre and Anne moved with the youngest 6 of their 10 children[1] to what is today the Canadian province of Prince Edward Island, then called Île Saint-Jean. With them came Charles Arseneau, their second-oldest son, with his own wife and children. In 1730 (before the census that year) another son settled with wife and offspring alongside his parents and brother. This was the eldest of Pierre and Anne’s progeny, and the third Acadian bearing the name of Pierre Arseneau.

Altogether, this accounts for 8 of the 10 children. The two others did not settle on the Island. Oldest daughter Anne had married in Beaubassin in 1720 and died there before the move. Third-oldest son Jean had married there as well, around 1725, and stayed behind.[13]

Their migration has a historical context. Some 15 years earlier in 1713, Acadie (Nova Scotia in its older, larger sense) had been ceded once and for all to Britain. But Île St-Jean and today’s Cape Breton remained with France. In 1720, the mother country attempted its first official colonization of Île St-Jean, bringing settlers from France, under auspices of the Comte de Saint-Pierre. Only a tiny smattering of Acadians joined that effort over the next few years. That colonial gesture persisted for only 4 years, collapsing financially in 1724, and most of the stranded immigrants moved back to France or to the decade-old but growing town of Louisbourg in Cape Breton. Acadians remained nervous about moving to the Island, however, for fear that the Comte still had a claim to the place, which might have put them under the thumb of an overlord.[14]

Still, a number of the Comte’s recruits did remain on Île Saint-Jean, farming or fishing or both. Also, an occasional new French emigré arrived to put down roots there. (Some of the latter had been among the large numbers of seasonal cod-fishers who arrived from France annually. Others of them - judging by the early census data from 1728 to 1735 - were undoubtedly small entrepreneurs who hired such seasonal workers.[15]) By 1728, the Acadians’ fears must have subsided a bit as well, because an unprecedented number of families crossed from the mainland in that year, including this Arseneau household and a few close kin and former neighbours, which helped bring the total non-aboriginal population of the island to about 300 in that year.

Pioneering their own small Acadian hamlet, the Arseneau newcomers established their farms further west than all those predecessors and contemporaries, at a spot known as Malpec (or Malpèque), on the western shore of the bay of the same name.

In their own household at Malpec in 1728, Pierre and Anne had 2 older boys (“+15”), 2 younger boys and 2 young girls (“-15“), who would correspond to the six youngest of their 10 children[16][17] Another population count in that same first year of 1728 notes that Pierre owned a schooner.[18]

Both the census and the other population survey in 1728 listed a third household head at Malpec. He was farmer Jean Lambert, with a wife and 2 young boys, who had come from Acadie in that same year. The census noted that they had no house. No other information has emerged about these folks, and Jean Lambert was no longer on Île Saint-Jean by 1730.

The 1730 census showed 8 children in the home of Pierre and Anne (with no indication of ages). Charles and his wife had 3. As already mentioned, Anne and Pierre’s eldest son, Pierre (the Third) was also present at Malpec by then. He and his wife also had 3 children in the house. Farming was still the livelihood of all three families at Malpec. No watercraft were recorded at the settlement in this survey.[19]

Another census took place in 1734.[20] An additional and more detailed population survey was completed in the same year. [21] Again, no boats were counted at Malpec. But this time, both counts included livestock. Malpec now had 4 households.

(1) Pierre was recorded as 62 years old; Anne as 60. (The most respected estimate of Pierre’s birth year being 1676, and of Anne’s being 1677, those ages are undoubtedly exaggerated.) With them were 4 boys aged 24, 18, 15, and 10, besides a daughter of 20. Their farm counted one of the larger complements of animals on the island. Their 17 larger beasts consisted of 5 oxen, 4 cows, 4 heifers, and 4 horses. They also had 8 ewes and 7 lambs (with no category for rams or wethers).
(2) Charles and wife Cécile, both reportedly aged 30, had 4 offspring: a daughter of age 8, 2 boys aged 6, and another boy of 4. Their farm held 3 oxen, 3 cows, 6 horses, 4 ewes, and 4 lambs.
(3) Pierre the Third’s age was given as 35, wife Marguerite’s as 30. Their daughters were 9 and 2, and their boys were 7 and 4. Like Charles’ parents, they had 17 large livestock: 4 oxen, 4 cow, 5 heifers, 4 horses. Their sheep numbered 5 ewes and 5 lambs.
(4) The new man was Louis DesRoches. He and his teenaged brother Julien had arrived around 1731 from the little town of Carolles on the west coast of Normandy (probably as seasonal cod-fishers). Louis settled at Malpec as a farmer, marrying Marguerite Arseneau, daughter of Anne and Pierre. In 1734, Louis was correctly listed as 27 (he would turn 28 in October), his wife was 22, and their daughter was 2. They were tending 4 oxen, 3 cows, 2 ewes and 2 lambs.[22][23]

The same 4 farming households appeared in the 1735 census, but a fifth was added.

(1) Pierre the father showed a wife, 2 boys “+15,” 2 boys “-15,” 1 girl, 16 “large livestock,” 18 “small livestock,” and one “boat for commerce,” and grain production of 37 bushels.
(2) Charles and wife had 4 boys of +15 and 2 girls, besides 7 big animals, 4 small ones, and 12 bushels of grain.
(3) With Pierre the son were listed a wife, 3 boys in the older category, 2 girls, 6 large livestock, 3 smaller animals, and only 8 bushels.
(4) Louis DesRoches and wife had a boy of +15 in their home (undoubtedly Louis’ brother Julien, who was 21 by then but would not marry until much later), and still only 1 daughter. Their farm possessed 4 bigger animals and 4 smaller ones, with a grain output of 6 bushels.
(5) The new arrival was an Acadian “builder” named François with an uncertain surname, which the transcript rendered as “Greniau?” (query included; no such surname). He was married, with 2 boys in the +15 column and a girl. Not farmers, they had still grown some 3 bushels of grain.

We cannot date the death of Pierre Arseneau, spouse of Anne Boudrot. His last recorded appearance was at Malpec in that 1735 census of Île-Saint-Jean, when he would have been about 58 years old by the favoured estimates.[1][24][25]

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 White, Stephen A., Patrice Gallant, and Hector-J Hébert. Dictionnaire Généalogique Des Familles Acadiennes. Moncton, N.-B.: Centre D'études Acadiennes, Université De Moncton, 1999, Print. P. 24-26
  2. Arsenault, Bona. "Histoire et généalogie des Acadiens", Le Conseil de la vie française en Amerique, Québec, 1965.
  3. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1686 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie 1686 Census Transcribed. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 15-60.
    Pierre ARSENAULT 40, Marie GUERIN 24; children: Pierre 10, Abraham 8.
    (Note that Port-Royal resident "Arsenault" also had property at Beaubassin in 1686, consisting of 1 gun, 30 arpents of land, 8 cattle, 4 sheep, and 6 hogs.
  4. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1693 Acadian Census at Port-Royal, Acadie 1693 Census Transcribed. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 62-108
    1693 Beaubassin: Pierre ARSENAULT [Sr.] 43, Marie GUERIN his wife 30, Pierre 16, Abraham 14, Charles 3, Jacques 1; 14 cattle, 10 sheep, 5 hogs, 8 arpents, 2 guns.
  5. Bernard, Jean. 2019. Genealogy of the Acadian Families of Prince Edward Island c. 1764 – c. 1921. Vol. I, Arsenault; Book 2, J-Z. Second edition (English version), rev. & updated. Summerside PE: Published by the author. Pp. 1589-1599, 1606-1607.
  6. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1698 Acadian Census at Port-Royal, Acadie1698 Census Transcribed. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 110-150
    1698 Beaubassin: Pierre ARSENAULT [Jr.] 22; Anne BOUDROT his wife 21; 4 cattle, 8 sheep, 1 hog.
  7. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1700 Acadian Census at Port-Royal, Acadie 1700 Census Transcribed. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 151-173.
    Pierre ARSENEAU 24; Anne BOUDROT (wife) 23; Pierre 2; 7 cattle; 10 sheep, 2 hogs, 4 arpents, 1 gun.
  8. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1701 Acadian Census at Port-Royal, Acadie 1701 Census Transcription. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 174-211.
    Pierre ARSENEAU, his wife, 2 boys, 15 arpents, 12 cattle, 14 sheep, 2 hogs, 1 gun.
  9. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1707 Acadian Census at Port-Royal, Acadie 1707 Census Transcription. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 221-237.
    Pierre ARSENAULT and Anne BOUDROT, 2 boys less than 14, 1 girl less than 12; 4 arpents, 10 cattle, 13 sheep, 6 hogs.
  10. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1714 Acadian Census at Port-Royal, Acadie 1714 Census Transcription. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 239-261.
    Pierre ARSENAUT and Anne BOUDROT: Pierre, Charles, Anne, Francois, Jean, Marguerite, Jacques.
  11. Bernard, pp. 1606-1607.
  12. White, Stephen A. La généalogie des trente-sept familles hôtesses des "Retrouvailles 94", Les Cahiers de la Société historique acadienne, vol. 25, nos 2 et 3 (1994). Arsenault English translationArsenault
  13. Bernard p. 1607.
  14. Lockerby, Earle. 2007. “Le comte de Saint-Pierre et l’île Saint-Jean.” The Island Magazine no. 61 (spr-sum):15-23.
  15. The story of the seasonal cod fishery from France is richly told (in French) and lushly pictured in a 2013 book from the Musée de Bretagne at Rennes, Terre-Neuve, Terre-Neuvas
  16. White, Stephen A. Dictionnaire généalogique des familles acadiennes, "Ajouts et corrections"; Publication: Université de Moncton, Centre d'études acadiennes; Online p. 9.
  17. "1728 Acadian Census for Ile St. Jean/Prince Edward Island." Transcribed by Dave Hunter, posted in 2000, accessed Mar 2020 at http://www.islandregister.com/1728a.html. Beware, however: these transcripts contain occasional errors. When in doubt, consult the originals in the collection "Archives des colonies : Série G 1 - Recencement - 2574," posted at http://heritage.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.lac_reel_c2574, where the censuses of 1728 to 1735 are found on pages [not image numbers] 210-273.
  18. "Rolle des habitants de l’Isle St. Jean - 1728." Transcribed by Dave Hunter, posted in 2001, accessed Mar 2020 at http://www.islandregister.com/databases/1728db.cgi?search=.&method=exact.
  19. "1730 Acadian Census for Ile St. Jean/Prince Edward Island." Transcribed by Dave Hunter, posted in 2000, accessed Mar 2020 at http://www.islandregister.com/1730a.html. Note: This transcript has Pierre's year of arrival on the Island as 1728, while the manuscript census gives 1730.
  20. Dave Hunter; Transcription of the September 1734 Acadian Census at Isle Saint-Jean, Acadie " Recensement de l'Isle Saint-Jean au mois de septembre 1734" Original census can be found at Originals on microfilm F-768, pages 242 to 252, p. 12-13. "Acadie Recensements 1671-1752," Library and Archives Canada, MG 1, G1, volume 466, no. 40
  21. Dave Hunter; Transcription (Searchable database in English) of the 1734 Acadian Census at Isle Saint-Jean, Acadie 1734 census at Isle Saint-Jean Transcript on microfilm C-2574 (volume 467) of the National Archives of Canada "Rolle des habitans de l'Isle Saint-Jean, divisé par havres et rivières, pour l'année 1734 ...," images 259 to 266, image 265 Original census can be found at Originals on microfilm F-768, No 41, pages 253 to 259, p. Item 4-5 "Acadie Recensements 1671-1752," Library and Archives Canada, MG 1, G1, volume 466, no. 41
  22. For the DesRoches, see Barriault, Marcel. 2006. ‘’Famille DesRoches’’, special issue of Les Cahiers de la Société historique acadienne 37 ( nos 2-3, Sep). Or see the English translation by John DeRoche at https://1drv.ms/u/s!ArT-xrapBXj5xk8kuX_x1R6IbZlu?e=MCgzFM.
  23. Also for the DesRoches at Malpec, see the much later 1752 census by the Sieur de LaRoque, at http://www.islandregister.com/1752_page11.html#malpec. Julien and Louis are the fourth and fifth entries.
  24. Karen Theriot Reader Pierre 1676 citing E-mail posting on <ACADIAN-CAJUN-L@rootsweb.com> on 18 Aug 1998 by Chris THOMAS.
  25. 1735 Acadian Census for Ile St. Jean/Prince Edward Island. Transcribed by Dave Hunter, posted in 2000, accessed Mar 2020 at http://www.islandregister.com/1735a.html.


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Comments: 5

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Hi Shae, thanks for the note. It looks like he is connectted to Boudrot-130 and she is the daugher of Jean Boudrot. It's in the biography as well.
posted by Jacqueline Girouard
Boudrot-110 should be removed as a wife of Pierre. He was married to Boudrot-130, daughter of Jean Boudrot and Marguerite Bourgeois. See http://www.acadiansingray.com/Appendices-ATLAL-ARCENEAUX.htm#ARCENEAUX
posted by Shae (Toups) Simpson
My ancestor, 7th great grandfather.
posted by Cindy (Guidry) Beverly
I think the problem arises from a confusion over which Pierre Arseneau we are dealing with here. Marie Arseneau-31 is the granddaughter of Arseneau-15. Her father is Pierre the third, Arseneau-103, who is the son of Pierre second, #15.
posted by John DeRoche
Marie Arseneau-31 flagged by error program, not likely to be the daughter of this man; birth is after father's death for example.
posted by Jacqueline Girouard