William (Aubigny) d'Aubeney

William (Aubigny) d'Aubeney (aft. 1173 - bef. 1221)

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Sir William "3rd Earl of Arundel" d'Aubeney formerly Aubigny aka de Albini, d'Aubigny
Born after in Arundel Castle, Sussexshire, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married before 1200 [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died before in Rome, Italymap
Profile last modified 11 Sep 2019 | Created 1 Feb 2011 | Last significant change: 13 Sep 2019
15:57: Michael Cayley edited a message from Michael Cayley on the page for William (Aubigny) d'Aubeney (aft.1173-bef.1221). [Thank Michael for this]
This page has been accessed 10,477 times.
Illustrious Men
William d'Aubeney was one of 16 Illustrious Men, counselors to King John, who were listed in the preamble to Magna Carta.
Join: Magna Carta Project
Discuss: magna_carta

Contents

Biography

William (Aubigny) d'Aubeney was a member of aristocracy in the British Isles.

Birth and Parentage

William d'Aubeney was the son of William Daubeney, 2nd Earl of Arundel and Maud de St Hilaire.[1][2] His birth date is uncertain; the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography suggests it may have been in about 1174.[2]

Life

In 1199 William paid King John 450 marks to gain possession of Arundel Castle, part of his inheritance from his father.[2]

William was a close associate of King John. In 1209 he was one of the king's negotiators in his dispute with Archbishop Stephen Langton.[2] In 1213 he witnessed John's submission to the Pope, in which he surrendered England to the Pope.[1] In 1215 he accompanied King John to Runnymede and was one of the "Illustrious Men", the royal counsellors listed in the Magna Carta.[1][2]

In 1216 after King John abandoned Winchester, he joined the forces of the future Louis VIII, but returned to the royalist side in July 1217. His possessions were restored and he was appointed Justiciar.[1][2]

In 1218 he joined the Fifth Crusade, and was present when Damietta was occupied in 1219.[1][2]

Marriage and Children

William married Mabel, daughter of Hugh, Earl of Chester and Bertrade de Montfort.[1] At his death in 1221 his son William was just of age[1] so the marriage must have taken place before 1200. Wikipedia says the marriage took place after 1196.[3] He and Mabel had six children who lived to inherit or have heirs.

Death

William d'Aubeney died at Rome. News of his death reached England on 30 March 1221, so his death must have been a little before that.[1][2] He was buried at Wymondham Priory, Norfolk.[1][2]

Research Notes

Daughter Nicole

Cokayne's Complete Peerage lists Nicole and Colette separately[1], but these are alternative forms of the same first name.

Jean/Joan wife of Amandus Sutton

Another child has previously been attached to William: Jean or Joan. There seems to be no good source for her being William's daughter. The only reference appears to be in the Sutton pedigree in the Visitations of Norfolk, which has "Amandus Lord Sutton first of that name" married to an unnamed daughter of "Albany Earle of Arundell".[7] This not only does not give her first name but also fails to identify which Earl of Arundel is supposed to have been her mother - and there are a number of questions around the early part of this pedigree. Another, later Sutton pedigree in Charles Frost's Notices relative to the early history of the town and port of Hull - which differs from the Visitation Pedigree - does not name Amandus's wife, but implies that Amandus was an adult in 1186.[8] The estimated birth date in Jean's own profile is 1188, which would pretty well rule her out as a daughter of the William d'Aubeney of this profile. If she was a wife of Amandus Sutton, she may have been born well before that as Amandus is said to have been of advanced age during the abbacy of Thomas, Abbot of Meaux, which was from 1186 to 1197.[9]

Sources

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 G E Cokayne. Complete Peerage, new edition, volume I, St Catherine Press, 1910, pp. 236-238
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, entry for 'Aubigny, William d' [William de Albini], third earl of Arundel', print and online 2004, available online through some libraries
  3. Wikipedia: William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel
  4. Frederick Leis Weis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America before 1700, 8th edition, Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, p. 25, line 16C.27
  5. 5.0 5.1 The Visitation of Cheshire in the Year 1580, Harleian Society, 1882, pp. 5-6, Google Books
  6. Frederick Leis Weis. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who came to America before 1700, p. 125, line 126.30
  7. The Visitations of the County of Nottingham in the Years 1569 and 1614, Harleian Society, 1871, p. 186, Internet Archive
  8. Charles Frost. Notices relative to the early history of the town and port of Hull, pub. J B Nichols, London, 1827, pedigree facing p. 99, Internet Archive and Google Books
  9. George Poulson. The History and Antiquities of the Seigniory of Holderness, in the East-Riding of the County of York, volume II, pub. Thomas Topping (Hull) and W Pickering (London), 1841, p.323, Google Books
  • Cokayne, G E. Complete Peerage, new edition, volume I, St Catherine Press, 1910
  • Richardson, Douglas. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. Salt Lake City: the author, 2013, Vol. II pp 252-254. See also WikiTree's source page for Royal Ancestry.
  • Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, entry for 'Aubigny, William d' [William de Albini], third earl of Arundel', print and online 2004, available online through some libraries
  • Marshall, George William. The Visitations of the County of Nottingham in the Years 1569 and 1614 (London, 1871) Page 186 "Amandus Lord Sutton first of that name" married "... daughter of Albanye Earle of Arundell"
  • The Visitation of Cheshire in the Year 1580, Harleian Society, 1882, pp. 5-6, Google Books
  • Wikipedia: William d'Aubigny, 3rd Earl of Arundel


More Genealogy Tools



Sponsored Search




Sponsored Search by Ancestry.com

DNA
No known carriers of William's DNA have taken a DNA test.

Have you taken a DNA test? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.



Images: 2
Aubigny/Arundel arms
Aubigny/Arundel arms

Coat of Arms
Coat of Arms

Collaboration

On 11 Sep 2019 at 17:33 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

Magna Carta project logo
100% 5-star profile (see more at Magna Carta Project Star Profiles)

On 17 Jun 2019 at 16:09 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

In a series of edits I have rearranged the biography, added sourced information, and detached a daughter Jean for whom there appears to be no good evidence, adding a research note. Please improve the biography further! And please correct any typos etc.

On 16 Jun 2019 at 15:46 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

After a rather longer delay than I had anticipated, I have just started work on this profile. I will do more over the next day or two. Meanwhile, please bear with any untidiness. Much of the bio is just a copy and paste from Wikipedia: I will aim to replace this, and give inline sourcing.

On 22 Apr 2019 at 14:37 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

I am starting to work on some of the profiles of "Illustrious Men" who were counsellors of King John and listed in the preamble to the Magna Carta. I will shortly be turning to this profile.

On 26 Oct 2018 at 15:41 GMT Andrew Lancaster wrote:

Collette is the same name as Nichola/Nichole, as Richardson states. Furthermore this generation is a well-studied one because the inheritance had to be split after the two brothers died, between FOUR daughters. ...Which brings us to the "Jean Sutton" that we have. I intend to disconnect her eventually. I see her wrong placement has been brought up before on her profile.

On 16 Aug 2017 at 02:33 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

Birth in 1170 cannot be right. Maud's husband Roger de Clare was still alive then. She married William d'Aubigny sometime after Roger's death, believed to have been 1173.

From William's profile:

"He married before Michaelmas 1176 Maud de Saint Hilary, widow of Roger de Clare (otherwise Roger Fitz Richard), 2nd Earl of Hertford." (citing Richardson)

On 15 Aug 2017 at 21:33 GMT J Cherry wrote:

Have removed error on birth date (after mother died)

On 24 Apr 2017 at 01:41 GMT Jason Clark wrote:

Henry II started with the one lion and evolved to three, but I agree this d'Aubigny line seems to have taken on something very similar. I found the other William d'Aubigny, for the other coat of arms. [1]

On 23 Apr 2017 at 02:05 GMT Joe Cochoit wrote:

We are at the very edge of when arms can be attributed to anyone as the earliest examples are the Matthew Paris shields writing c1240-1259.

It turns out that Matthew Paris gave the arms of William d'Aubigny, and these arms are correct (mostly, the lion should have a forked tail). [MP 36: Gules, a lion rampant queue fourchee or]

The arms of Henry II are Gules, three lions passant gardant or

On 22 Apr 2017 at 23:11 GMT M (Joslin) J wrote:

A Rampant Lion appeared on many coats of Arms. Such as those of William (William I) "The Lion, King of Scotland" of Scotland formerly Dunkeld-2 have uploaded a more appropriate Coat of Arms for William (Aubigny) d'Aubene/ I cannot post because I am not pre 1500 certified. You may if you wish

more comments



William is 27 degrees from Tanya Lowry, 20 degrees from Charles Tiffany and 11 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

A  >  Aubigny  |  D  >  d'Aubeney  >  William (Aubigny) d'Aubeney

Categories: Magna Carta | Illustrious Men | Earls of Arundel | Early Barony of Arundel | Early Barony of Old Buckenham