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William Aylett (abt. 1670 - abt. 1733)

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Col. William Aylett
Born about in New Kent, Virginiamap [uncertain]
Ancestors ancestors
Son of [uncertain] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died about in Fairfield Plantation, King William , Virginiamap
Profile last modified | Created 20 Feb 2011 | Last significant change: 9 Sep 2018
18:10: Ben Buckner deleted a message from Ben Buckner on the page for William Aylett. [Thank Ben for this]
This page has been accessed 752 times.

Categories: House of Burgesses, Virginia Colony.

Biography

William Aylett lived the later part of his life at Fairfield Plantation in St John's Parish in what became King William County, Virginia. A traditional source reported by W.W. Fontaine states that he was the son of Phillip Aylett and had a son Phillip,[1] but no primary sources have been found to support the existence of an elder Phillip Aylett, and other sources reported by Fontaine are suspected of being forgeries.[2] An alternative theory by P.N. Clarke makes William the son of William Aylett of York Co. VA (d. 1678/9).[3]

William Aylett was likely born in the part of New Kent County, Virginia that eventually became King William County, though this is merely surmised. The 1744 will of his son William gives us the names of two other sons, John and Benjamin. A later court case shows that he also had at least four daughters.[4] These daughters do not appear to be named collectively anywhere, though several of them have been identified. Anne Aylett was probably the eldest, and she married first Benjamin Walker[5] and second Rice Curtis. Three of them appear to have married Buckners, Jane, Elizabeth, and Judith. The first two are securely established by primary sources. Judith is attested in a Buckner family tradition, but contemporary support is lacking. However, the name "Aylett" does appear among Judith's grandchildren.

A 1755 lawsuit in the Caroline County order books[6] shows that William must have had at least 6 heirs who had heirs themselves, since this part of his estate (a group of slaves) was divided six ways. The six parties were:

  • Mary and Anne Aylett (guardian James Steptoe)[7]
  • William and John Aylett (guardian Thomas Dansie)[8]
  • Joseph Herring and wife Lydia
  • Eliza., Frans., and Jane Curtis (father Rice Curtis)
  • Phillip Buckner and wife Jane
  • Richard Buckner and wife Elizabeth (defendants)

This confirms that all of William's sons were dead by 1755 and that his daughters married the two Buckners, Rice Curtis, and Joseph Herring. Ann Curtis must also have been dead by then. Sons John and Benjamin probably died without issue, as they had no heirs alive in 1755 and clearly died young (prior to 1744).

Between this and his son William's will, we can construct the following list of children:

  • William Aylett (d. 1744)
  • John Aylett
  • Benjamin Aylett
  • Phillip Aylett
  • Anne (Aylett) Walker Curtis
  • Jane (Aylett) Robinson Buckner
  • Elizabeth (Aylett) Buckner
  • Lydia (Aylett) Herring

And (maybe)

  • Judith (Aylett) Hawes Buckner

We do know that he was at least somewhat active in the business of importing immigrants for headrights, since he received a 1000 acre patent in Essex County in 1704. The same year, he purchased land in King William County (King and Queen County prior to 1702; New Kent before 1691) from John Yarbrough.[9]

Col. William Aylett was appointed the first Clerk of Court in King William County when it was formed in 1702.[10] Since he was a clerk of court, it's probably safe to assume he was a mature man by this time, so he was certainly older than 30 and probably more like 40 years old. He had been a deputy clerk of James City County earlier in the same year, which may be a clue about his origins.[11] The clerkship was apparently heavily contested, with Justice John Waller having petitioned for it and William Aylette eventually defeating Orlando Jones in a ballot.[12] William was still clerk and also listed as one of the county's tobacco agents in 1714.[13] In 1729, he was still listed as the county clerk,[14] while his son William was one of the Justices of Westmoreland.[15]

The Encylopedia of Virginia Biography states that he was a Burgess for King William in the 1723-6 assembly and was armigerous.[16]

It is often asserted by tradition that the present William Aylett married Ann Taylor or Tayloe. There is wide agreement that her first name was Ann/e, but some sources also have Woodward as her maiden name, and a few also confuse her with the wife of her son William, who married Anne Ashton. No primary sources seem to have been offered for these assertions, so this should be taken as an open question.

He wrote his will in 1730 and it was probated in King William on 17 Mar 1733, so he certainly died sometime in 1733 or early 1734 (NS).[17]

Research Notes

The 1744 Westmoreland County will of William Aylett refers to his deceased father William (the present William Aylett), his deceased brother John Aylett, and brothers Benjamin Aylett and Philip Aylett.[18] This younger William married Ann Ashton, probably sometime around 1724, and somehow people get confused about this and try to make Ann Ashton his father's wife.[19]

Internet sources sometimes invent a middle name "Phillip" for the present William Aylett, but middle names were not usually encountered in this historical period and there is no primary evidence for this middle name.

William's will is attested in a number of secondary sources and occasionally transcribed partially (it definitely names sons John and Phillip), though no full transcriptions are known. Its current location is unclear, though presumably it's held in the manuscript collections of the Library of Virginia. Unfortunately, none of the known secondary sources are very clear about where it's located. There do seem to be transcript copies held by the King and Queen Historical Society.[20] Presumably anyone who's really serious about researching the Ayletts would make getting this a priority, since most internet genealogies seem to be entirely unaware that it even exists.

Clarke in Old King William Homes and Families (1897) made William Aylett (high sheriff of York Co., d. 1678/9), a vestryman of Bruton Parish, the immigrant father of the present William Buckner and (again) married him off to his son's wife, Ann Ashton[21]; an anonymous reviewer for The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography pointed out that Clarke seems to have transposed two different sequences of names.[22] Clarke also seems to have been under the impression that King William County was created from York, but in fact King William was created from King and Queen County (1702), which had been created from New Kent County in 1691. New Kent was created from York in 1654, so the York County of the 1670s did not evolve into King William and by that time, the location of Fairfield was a fair ways from York County. Land records and William's will suggest that most of the land in King William county was actually purchased by him, so it's possible that William grew up in a different county and moved to King William around the time of its formation.

Sources

  1. Fontaine, William Winston, "Aylett Family Tradition," The William and Mary Quarterly, Volume: 15, (October 1, 1906), pp. 99-101 Aylett Family Tradition
  2. Lothrop Withington, Virginia Gleanings in England: Abstracts of 17th and 18th-century English Wills and Administrations Relating to Virginia and Virginians : a Consolidation of Articles from The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. II, Genealogical Publishing Com, 1980, p. 636-637.
  3. Peyton Neale Clarke, Old King William Homes and Families, Louisville, KY: Merton And Co., 1897, p. 26, Internet Archive
  4. Philip Alexander Bruce, William Glover Stanard, eds., "Book Reviews," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 5, p. 355 Google Books
  5. George H. S. King. "Further Notes on Captain George Buckner (1760-1828) and the Caroline County Buckners." The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 64, no. 3 (1956): 358-72. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4246237.
  6. J.F. Dorman, Caroline County, Virginia, Order Book, 1755-1758, Part 1, (Dorman, 1976), p. 53
  7. Probably daughters of William Jr., since his widow married a Steptoe.
  8. Probably Phillip's sons, see https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/40343456/martha-west-aylett - Dansie was an associate of Phillip's
  9. "Extracts from King William County Records. Book XI." The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 24, no. 4 (1916): 388-94 (see p. 392). http://www.jstor.org/stable/4243551.
  10. Ryland, Elizabeth Hawes. "Pamunkey Neck: The Birth of a Virginia County." The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 50, no. 4 (1942): 321-33. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4245201.
  11. "America and West Indies: March 1702, 21-25," in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies: Volume 20, 1702, ed. Cecil Headlam (London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1912), 153-170. British History Online, accessed August 16, 2018, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol20/pp153-170.
  12. "America and West Indies: March 1702, 11-13," in Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies: Volume 20, 1702, ed. Cecil Headlam (London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1912), 126-132. British History Online, accessed July 10, 2018, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers/colonial/america-west-indies/vol20/pp126-132.
  13. Des Cognets, Louis. English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records. [Princeton]: N. J., 1958, p. 25 Hathi Trust
  14. Des Cognets, Louis. English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records. [Princeton]: N. J., 1958, p. 48 Hathi Trust
  15. Des Cognets, Louis. English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records. [Princeton]: N. J., 1958, p. 53 Hathi Trust
  16. https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Page:Encyclopedia_of_Virginia_Biography_volume_1.djvu/206
  17. Malcolm Hart Harris, Old New Kent County, Vol. II, West Point, Virginia : M.H. Harris, c 1977, p. 832
  18. William Armstrong Crozier, ed., Virginia County Records: Westmoreland County, New Series, Vol. 1, Genealogical Publishing Com, 1971, p. 48
  19. Philip Alexander Bruce, William Glover Stanard, eds. "Lee of Virginia," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 4, p. 474 Google Books
  20. Will of Col. William Aylett, died 1733, King William Co. Va., transcripts (2 copies), Box #69;Folder #10, see http://www.kingandqueenmuseum.org/
  21. Peyton Neale Clarke, Old King William Homes and Families, Louisville, KY: Merton And Co., 1897, p. 26, Internet Archive
  22. Philip Alexander Bruce, William Glover Stanard, eds., "Book Reviews," The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 5, p. 355 Google Books
  • <span id="hosk"|Hoskins of Virginia]]: Ancestry.com. Hoskins of Virginia and related families : Hundley, Ware, Roy, Garnett, Waring, Bird, Buckner, Dunbar, Trible, Booker, Aylett, [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005. Original data: Warner, Charles Willard Hoskins,. Hoskins of Virginia and related families : Hundley, Ware, Roy, Garnett, Waring, Bird, Buckner, Dunbar, Trible, Booker, Aylett, Carter, Upshaw. Tappahannock, Va.: unknown, 1971.
  • Source: S500046 Sharon Marden Marden Web Site MyHeritage Family tree: 463350171-1 Discovery Media: 463350171-1 William Philip Aylett, Jr. Certainty: 3 22 APR 2018 Added via a Person Discovery


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On 29 Aug 2018 at 12:50 GMT DK Clews wrote:

Aylett-122 and Aylett-26 appear to represent the same person because: duplicates?

On 11 Jul 2018 at 16:08 GMT Ben Buckner wrote:

Have you got a reason what they shouldn't be merged?

On 11 Jul 2018 at 12:12 GMT DK Clews wrote:

Aylett-122 and Aylett-26 are not ready to be merged because: ...

On 10 Jul 2018 at 19:33 GMT Ben Buckner wrote:

Aylett-122 and Aylett-26 appear to represent the same person because: Apparently the same Col. William Aylette - despite wildly different birth year estimates. 1680 is much too late though.

On 10 Jul 2018 at 18:16 GMT Ben Buckner wrote:

Aylett-122 is apparently a duplicate of this, but with a different wild guess for the birth date.

On 10 Jul 2018 at 17:42 GMT Ben Buckner wrote:

Is this supposed to be William Aylett or Phillip Aylett? There was no "William Phillip Aylett".



William is 33 degrees from Albert Einstein, 19 degrees from Steven Harris and 13 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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