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James (Badcock) Babcock (1612 - 1679)

James "Jeames, Jams" Babcock formerly Badcock aka Badcocke, Badcoke, Badcok
Born in Englandmap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married 1638 [location unknown]
Husband of — married 1669 (to 1679) in Westerly, Kings, Rhode Islandmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Islandmap
Profile last modified | Created 3 Nov 2013
This page has been accessed 1,047 times.
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Contents

Biography

This profile is part of the Babcock Name Study.
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James (Badcock) Babcock migrated from England to USA ~1640.
Flag of USA  ~1640

JAMES BABCOCK was the progenitor of the Babcock family of Westerly and the region round about. [1]

The story of the Babcocks of Rhode Island has been confused and complicated through inclusion in several fraudulent genealogies such as those offered by Royal Ralph Hinman in his Catalogue of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of Connecticut published in 1846. [2]

James Babcock was born in England. His parents and his specific place of origin are unknown. Fabricated genealogies claimed that his father was an Englishman named James Badcock whose existence is doubtful. We can be reasonably sure that James Babcock was born about 1612, because on January 18th 1670, he was summoned before the Commissioners of Connecticut, and on that day gave a testimony "calling his age 58 years, his son James 29 and his son John 26 years." [3] [4]

The first evidence of his life in the American colonies, is of his admittance as resident of Portsmouth, Rhode Island on the 25th February 1642. [5] [6]

James Babcock's biographer, Stephen Babcock has pointed out that in the Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth edited by the State Librarian, under direction of the Rhode Island Legislature (published 1901) and in Colonial Records of Rhode Island, his name was spelled in various ways, "probably according to the fancy of the clerk of the town meeting, namely, Badcock, Badeooke, Badcocke, and Badcook." For the first forty years of their residence on Rhode Island, the family name for James and his sons was usually recorded as Badcock, then in the probate records for John Badcock's estate the name is written as Babcock, a change that appears to have been permanently adopted by the family. [7] [8]

On July 10th 1648; his name appears as Jeames Babcock. among the 17 "received fremen of the town of Portsmouth chosen for the trial of the general officers" of Portsmouth [9] and it isn't long before his name appears on the Jury lists. [10] In February 1650 he is deputised to collect the taxes (rates) imposed on cattle in the town. [11]

At the time of his admittance as a resident of the town of Portsmouth, James Babcock held a grant of 10 acres "at the first brooke, next the footpath eastward" "lying toward the head of said brooke" according to Stephen Babcock quoting the County records of Rhode Island and explaining that James' farm would have been on Sprague street east of Dana Street in Portsmouth, running up Butt Hill. Beside this property with his home, garden and farm buildings, James Babcock negotiated for several other parcels of land for pasture. [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17]

James Babcock was a blacksmith and gunsmith, and it must have been in this capacity that in 1643, and again 1650, he was one of those appointed to take account of all the arms held by residents of Portsmouth, and to make sure that all arms in possession of the colonists were in good working order. It is interesting to note that Butt Hill has also been called Windmill Hill, and that the land in this area was not particularly suited to farming. Along with other industries that must have been established here, James smelted iron ore found in local rivers, bogs and swamps, and from the smelted ore, forged all manner of nails and farm implements. [18] [19] [20]

In May 1655 James Babcock appears as one of those appointed by the Portsmouth town council to appraise the estate of John Wood, who had died without leaving a will. [21]

In the years 1656, 1658 & 1659, he was a member of the General Court of Commissioners of Rhode Island for Portsmouth. [22] As the Portsmouth settlement grew, the Indian population came under increasing pressure to give up land to the settlers for cultivation. James Babcock and several others drove a band of Peaquot Indians from planting grounds; and on February 10th 1664, James Babcock and "the rest of the people on Rhode Island on the east side of the Powtuck river" received a stern and detailed warning from the Council of the Colony Connecticut to cease their provocation of the Indians. [23]

On April 8th 1656, difficulties with local Indians resulted in James and seven others "appointed to go over to the mayne to treat with the Indian Sachems (leaders) to inform them of the mynd of the towne, that they come not upon the Island but according to order given." [24] He was fully involved with local administration; on January 6th 1657, "James Badcock and John Sanford are again authorized to meet with Newport men according to former order." James Badcock and six others were chosen a committee to meet with committees appointed from other towns. [25] In November 30th 1657, James and four others were "appointed to apportion land to those that want land." [26] James Badcock was appointed with others to lay out highways in December 27th 1660; and on May 11th 1661, was appointed to settle disputed land boundaries. [27] The last record which refers to him in Portsmouth is dated Dec. 19, 1662. At this time reference is made to a committee which was previously appointed to lay out certain lands, and this committee, or the larger part of them, were ordered to restore to William Wilbor three quarters of an acre of land which the committee had previously taken from him in their official work. James Badcock was one of this committee, and is referred to as James Badcock, Sr., suggesting that James, Jr., who had reached his majority that year, was then living in Portsmouth. [28]

In 1660, a tract of land on Rhode Island, estimated to be twenty miles by ten miles, known as Misquamicut, afterward named Westerly, was purchased from the Indian Chief Sosoa by a company organized at Newport County, Rhode Island. [29] The company named James Babcock and four others to manage their affairs at Misquamicut. In September, 1661, the purchasers visited Misquamicut and a certain part of the tract was appointed by lot. James Babcock's lot was 52.

About 1662, James Babcock moved permanently to Westerly where he took a prominent part in a number of disputes caused by problems with Indian territorial claims and those by Connecticut's claim to territory in and about Westerly. [30]Connecticut, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, claimed prior jurisdiction over Pequot country including land west and east of the Pawcatuck River following the Pequot War of 1636 [31] James Babcock, with Rhode Island Plantation, settled Misquamicut as a means to anchor their claim to the disputed territory and to claim all jurisdiction over the land between the Pawcatuck River and Narragansett Bay. Claimed boundaries overlapped, the paper town of Southertowne created by the Massachusetts Bay Colony included parts of Westerly and Stonington, conflicting with land acquired by the Rhode Island Pettaquamscut Company. On one occasion, twenty or more men from Southertowne crossed the Pawcatuck River, broke into James Babcock’s house, and abducted him across the river as a prisoner. [32]

In 1665 James sold his Portsmouth property to Thomas Fish. [33]

The settlement at Westerly was incorporated May 1669, at which time there were twenty-four freeman in the town, four of whom were Babcocks. James and his three sons, James, John, and Job. (Westerly in those days included the present towns of Westerly, Charlestown, Hopkinton and Richmond.) [34]

James in his fifty ninth year, on March 2nd 1678, was baptized by Elder William Hiscox along with Naomi Burdick and united with the Seventh Day Baptist church of Newport and Westerly, [35]

James Babcock died on the 12th June 1697. On the 17th September 1697 is sons John and Job Babcock appeared before the Governor of Rhode Island at a court held at Westerly, and "being solemnly engaged" testified to the truth of their father's will as he verbally gave it to them. The will is recorded in vol. i, Land Evidence, in the office of the Secretary of State, Providence, R. I. Among " the several legacies named in the will, he "bequeathed unto his son Joseph all his housing and lands for him, the said Joseph Badcock to take unto his possession when he shall attain to the age of twenty-one years." In his will, James "did give unto his wife, Elizabeth Badcock, for the maintenance and bringing up of the three children he had by his second wife." [36]

Stephen Babcock concluded his biography of James Babcock with the observation that "These glimpses of an interesting- life show that James Badcock (Babcock), .Sr., was a man of sterling integrity and of strong convictions. He was respected by his neighbors, honored and trusted as a citizen, and ready to serve the community in whatever capacity he was appointed.." [37]

Children

James Babcock's first marriage was to Sarah, whose family name is unknown [38]

The children of James Babcock and Sarah were - [39]
1. James who was born about 1641 and married Jane Broun
2. John who was born about 1644 and married Mary Lawton
3. Job who was born about 1646 and married Jane Crandall
4. Mary who was born about 1648 and married William Champlin

Following Sarah's death in 1665, James Babcock married Elizabeth [40]

The children of James Babcock and Elizabeth were - [41]
5. Joseph who was born about 1670 and first married Dorothy Key, then next married Mrs. Hannah Coates
6. Nathaniel, whose date of birth unknown (J. O. Austin says Nathaniel died on January 2nd 1710)
7. Elizabeth, whose date of birth unknown. In the History of First Church of Stonington, Connecticut, by R. A. Wheeler; the following is noted - "Sept. 14. 1692, Elizabeth Babcock, daughter-in-law (stepdaughter) of William Johnson, baptized by Rev. Janice Noyes, Pastor of First Stonington Church."

Sources

  1. History of the Town of Stonington : Babcock Family p: 211; by Richard Anson Wheeler
  2. R.R. Hinman, repeated by Albert Welles and other genealogists since, incorrectly states that James Babcock was born in England in 1580; went to Leyden, Holland in 1620; emigrated to Connecticut in the ship Anne in 1623. A catalogue of the names of the first Puritan settlers of the Colony of Connecticut, with the time of their arrival in the colony, and their standing in society, together with their place of residence, as far as can be discovered by the records by Hinman, R. R. pub: Hartford 1846.
  3. James Babcock "was warned by a warrant to appear before them to make answer for seizure of three Connecticut men on a warrant issues by Tobias Saunders. He was released on bail. The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island by John Osborne Austin pub: Albany 1887 page:8
  4. Babcock, Stephen. Babcock Genealogy page 1
  5. The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island by John Osborne Austin pub: Albany 1887 page:8
  6. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page 19: The 25th ffebrary 1642 At a towne meetinge William Chatbourn admitted inhabitant of the towne of p and James Badcocke in admitted inhabi
  7. Babcock Genealogy, Stephen Babcock, MA, pp. 1-6
  8. see - James Babcock etc. as listed in the index page: 438 of Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth ed: Rhode Island Historical Society pub: Providence R.I. 1901
  9. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page 38
  10. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page 43
  11. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page 48
  12. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page 39
  13. The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island by John Osborne Austin pub: Albany 1887 page:8
  14. Windmill Hill, also known as Butts Hill is the site of a Revolutionary War fort and battlefield in which a descendant, Christopher Babcock (1761-1828) would take part.Butts Hill Fort Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project, D. K. Abbass, Ph.D
  15. The Babcock Genealogy by Stephen Babcock page 138
  16. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page: 22
  17. description of James Babcock's property at the time of sale in 1665 The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island Comprising Three Generations of Settlers Who Came Before 1690 - Westerly : James Babcock page : 8
  18. History of the Town of Stonington Babcock Family p: 211- by Richard Anson Wheeler pub: New London, Connecticut 1900
  19. The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island by John Osborne Austin pub: Albany 1887 page:8
  20. Butts Hill Fort Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project, D. K. Abbass, Ph.D
  21. May the 7th 1655 The Councell of the towne of Portsmouth being mett according to the law of the Collonie for the legall disposing of the estate of John Wood deceast to those to whom it belongs, the deseast not haueing left a will or testament, haue chosen m' .... Jeames Badcock etc. ... Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page: 322 - ed: Rhode Island Historical Society pub: Providence R.I. 1901
  22. The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island by John Osborne Austin pub: Albany 1887 page:8
  23. Yale Indian Papers Project : Warning to James Babcock
  24. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page 70
  25. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page: 83
  26. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page: 80
  27. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page: 94
  28. Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth page: 116
  29. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tobias_Saunders : Founding and Settlement of Westerly, RI
  30. Babcock, Stephen. Babcock Genealogy page 3
  31. Pequot Museum : The History of the Pequot War
  32. Rhode Island: Tradition of Independence 1636-1776 page: 53; thesis by James Vincent Gialanella
  33. He sold Thomas Fish for £50 land and dwelling house, barn, orchard etc. in Portsmouth. His wife Sarah giving her consent. The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island Comprising Three Generations of Settlers Who Came Before 1690 - Westerly : James Babcock page : 8
  34. Wikipedia List of Early Settlers of Rhode Island
  35. Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society vol: 3 pub:1835 - page 117
  36. A copy of the will is printed in the appendix to Babcock Genealogy by Stephen Babcock Babcock Genealogy by Stephen Babcock pub: N.Y. Eaton & Mains 1903 p:541
  37. Babcock Genealogy by Stephen Babcock pub: N.Y. Eaton & Mains 1903 p:6
  38. "Badcock James 1612-1679 Stonginton CT. & 1/wf Sarah (b: ? d.1655) m: 1641 Portsmouth R.I. / Westerly R.I." in New England Marriages prior to 1700 p: 29 by Clarence Almon Torrey [1]
  39. Babcock, Stephen. Babcock Genealogy (New York: Eaton & Mains, 1903) p:6
  40. "Badcock James 1612-1679 Stonginton CT. & 2/wf Elizabeth (b: ? d: 1678) m: 1655 - 1670 (Elizabeth m: 2/ William Johnson) Portsmouth R.I. Westerly R.I." in New England Marriages prior to 1700 p: 29 by Clarence Almon Torrey [2]
  41. Babcock, Stephen. Babcock Genealogy (New York: Eaton & Mains, 1903) p:6
  • The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island: Comprising Three Generations of Settlers Who Came Before 1690 - Westerly : James Babcock page : 8 by Stephen Babcock, MA pub: New York; Eaton & Mains 1903

see also

  • James Babcock's will of 1679 Babcock Genealogy Appendix page: 541- by Stephen Babcock, MA pub: New York; Eaton & Mains 1903
  • Early New England Families. (Original Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2013. (By Alicia Crane Williams, Lead Genealogist.) James Badcock

Notes

Westerly, Rhode Island

June 29, 1660, a tract of land, estimated to he twenty miles by ten miles, known as Misquamicut, afterward Westerly, was purchased from the Indian chief Sosoa, by a company headed by William Vaugn. This company, numbering sixty or more. was organized at Newport, R. I. The purchasers well knew that in 1658 the Massachusetts colony claimed this tract, calling it a part of Sonthertown and adding it to Suffolk County, Boston being the county seat. Aug. 27, 1061, the company appealed to the Colonial Assembly of Rhode Island for assistance in defending their purchase against "adversaries which by a species of intrusion are seeking to make inroads upon our privilege of colonies jurisdiction." (C. R. of R. I.)

From Col. of R. I. Hist. Soc, published 1835, vol. iii. pp. 257-261, the following is taken: "Aug. 31, 1661, all purchasers were ordered by the trustees to meet at Cabel (Caleb) Carrs, at Newport, to go to Squamucuck." Two weeks later. Sept. 15, the company was at "Misquamicut," and a certain part of the tract was apportioned by lot. The number of James Badcock's lot was 52. At the time of this visit arrangements were made for a temporary occupancy of the land. The company was divided into small parties, each party to stay upon the land for a certain number of weeks. Anyone who refused to serve had to provide a substitute or pay a fine. Nov. 1. 1661, Tobias Sanders. Robert Runlet (Burdick), and Joseph Clark were arrested upon the land by the authority of Massachusetts. Sanders and Burdick were taken to Boston, where they were fined forty pounds each and imprisoned "until their fines should be paid, and until each should give security in £100 for his future good conduct." Nov. 12, 166l, the number of trustees for the "Squamicuck" purchase was increased from eight to eighteen. Two of the names added were James Badcock and John Badcock.</p>

The following Mar., 1661-2, the company made their first permanent settlement at Misquamicut (Westerly). For details of the preparation and starting for their new home, see records of (3)John(2) Badcock. It will be observed that the name of the company in the early records was spelled in several different ways. Before starting from Newport the company named James Badcock and four others who were appointed and "commissionated to act for us as to the managing of our affairs at Misquamucock who are to discourse and answer to any that shall come to debate matters with them. They or any two of them, to forewarn any whatsoever either to build or sow, mow or fall timber upon that tract of land." (End of quotation from Col. of R. I. Hist. Soc.)

In 1662 Connecticut laid claim to the tract, and did not entirely relinquish her claim until 1728. Soon after arriving at Misquamicut disputes arose with Connecticut authorities about the boundary line. These disputes led to arrests, imprisonments, fines, appeals, and the appointment of commissions between the two colonies. Mar. 18, 1664, James Badcock petitioned the General Court (Assembly), sitting at Newport, for protection "against such riotous actings as are done and committed by the men of Southertown against him." (Southertown being in Connecticut.) The court requested the Governor and Deputy Governor to send a letter to the government of Connecticut "to see what they will say by way of answer to such riotous acting as are done and committed by the men of Southertown against the said Badcock." (C. R. of R. I., vol. ii, pp. 32-34.) In 1605 James sold his dwelling house, barn, orchard, etc., in Portsmouth, R. I., to Thomas Fish for fifty pounds; his wife. Sarah, giving her consent. James, Jr.. witnessed the deed.

It appears that in May, 1667, James Badcock with a company of men drove the Pequot Indians from planting ground claimed by the Indians, located on the Misquamicut purchase east of the Pawcatuck River. May 18, 1667, Harmon Garret (alias Wequascooke. chief of the Pequots) petitioned the Gieneral Court of Connecticut, praying "that such men as wear hats and clothes like Englishmen, but have dealt with us like wolves and hears, may he called to account." At a Connecticut court held at Wickford ( which is now in R. I.). June 21, 1670. James Badcock was charged by Mr. Gookin. of Cambridge, Mass., with driving Harmon Garret and his Indians (tenants of Gookin) from their land. (All of the above is from Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, book 1665-78, pp. 529-546.) Westerly was incorporated May, 1669, at which time there were twenty-four freemen in the town, four of whom were Badcocks, viz., James and his three sons, James, John, and Job. (W. and W.) Westerly then comprised the present towns of Westerly, Charlestown, Hopkinton, and Richmond. On June 17, 1670, James Badcock, Sr., by virtue of a warrant issued by Tobias Sanders, arrested three Connecticut men. John Frink, Benjamin Palmer, and Thomas Bell, who had crossed into Rhode Island to summon the Westerly men to appear before a certain court to be held in Connecticut. Said Frink was sent to Rhode Island Jail. The next day Mr. Badcock was arrested by officers from Connecticut and placed under a bond of £100 to "personally appear and surrender himself to Nehemga Palmer, Constable of Stonington, pro tempore. Wednesday morning next by six of the clock." Tobias Sanders and Thomas Stanton became his bondsmen, each for £50. (C. R. of R. I., vol. ii, pp. 319, 320.) Col. A. J. Babcock, of Springfield, Ill., says: "We take it for granted that bright and early 'six of the clock,' on the morning of June 23, 1670, Badcock was there ready to answer all charges of the adverse faction; but it appears they were not ready to prove these charges. The case was continued until June of the next year, Badcock giving a bond in the sum of £20 to appear at the County Court in New London. Conn." The details of these arrests, counter-arrests, bonds, and trials are repeated substantially as here stated in Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut. 1665-78, p. 553. June 23, 1670, is supposed to have been the date that James. Sr., made affidavit to the ages of himself and his two sons. (See Preface in this volume.) May 18, 1671, James Badcock and John Badcock are recorded as renewing their allegiance to Rhode Island and the king; most of the inhabitants, including James, Jr., and Job Badcock. having renewed their allegiance the previous day. (C. R. of R. I., vol. ii. pp. 388, 389.) That James owned land in Westerly is proved by Westerly Town Records, book i. p. 66. These records show that April 17, 1691. "Joseph Babcock of Stonington relinquished to his brother James Babcock, of Westerly, for a consideration, his claim to land belonging to their father, the late James Babcock of Westerly, and lying on the east side of the Pawcatuck River."



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Comments: 18

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There's a bogus marriage date of 1638 in RI. the date certainly doesn't exist and I'm going to remove it.
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Anne B
I've removed PGM since he arrived post 1640 and because Rhode Island thru US history is protecting/co-managing? (Is there no google group for RI?)
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Jillaine Smith
The United States Project will manage this profile on behalf of Rhode Island.

There is no Google Group for Rhode Island. The only states for which WikiTree has set up Google Groups are Arkansas, Connecticut, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Not all of these are in active use.

posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Ellen Smith
We also have Maryland Project, and even more listed in the category.
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by William Foster Jr
edited by William Foster Jr
All of the states have Project pages like that one, but only a few states have their own Google Groups (and associated project accounts).
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Ellen Smith
I just expanded the Albert Welles profile and the RR Hinman profile to include clear information regarding the still spreading Albert Welles Fraud and added links on Albert to the wikitree efforts to contain the fraudulent info. . Believe it or not , neither profile mentioned the fraud!

  Your warning about the fraud in the early paragraph of this James's profile is really good, since that Hinman/Welles junk is really all over the place, i.e. on his Family Search Profile and  his Find a Grave, mixed up with perfectly good data and accompanied by that lovely portrait which looks like a REAL Rembrandt and is surely NOT our James Babcock at all. 

Managers, please consider hyperlinking to both Hinman and Welles names in the early paragraph of this profile so that with a click someone who wants to understand the fraud can learn more. 

Here's the code if you like the hyperlinking idea : R.R. Hinman and Albert Welles, but it's a great profile as is and please do what you want.

p.s.  Albert Welles's own writing implies his mom was Mary Babcock daughter of Ichabod Babcock of Gales Ferry, Connecticut. Ichabod 1758-1848, maybe? Buried in Gales Ferry Cemetery..... Could be that's were our bad luck started???? 

posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by R Adams
I would like to add
This profile is part of the Babcock Name Study.
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Judy (Flamer) Bramlage
I removed the coat of arms from this profile. it was a fabrication by Albert Welles. It is now displayed on the page American Family Antiquity, about the Welles publication where it appeared.
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Ellen Smith
Removed parents; https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Badcock-78 -

please keep this profile free of connection with known fraudulent genealogies.

posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Valerie Willis
Babcock-1153 and Badcock-105 appear to represent the same person because: came name, dates & places etc. LNAB "Babcock"

Some documents used the original English spelling "Badcock" for these children but the family quickly adopted "Babcock" which would be correct LNAB here

posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Valerie Willis
Babcock-1153 and Badcock-105 appear to be the same person. I propose a merge using the spelling Badcock as this seems to be the spelling used during James III's lifetime.
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Jill (Smith) Bogner
Would like to suggest this profile be considered for project protection.
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Lydia Vierson
Do you have a source for the father?
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Michelle (Gerard) Hartley
I own an original copy of the Babcock Genealogy book compiled by Cyrus Brown (1909) that starts with this James Babcock. If anyone else has a copy please contact me - my binding is bad and some of the illustrations are loose. I need to know where they need to be in the book before I have it rebound.
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Lydia Vierson
I own an original copy of the Babcock Genealogy book compiled by Cyrus Brown (1909) that starts with this James Babcock.
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Lydia Vierson
Babcock-1613 and Badcock-32 appear to represent the same person because: same dates, same wife, same family lineage
posted on Babcock-1153 (merged) by Robin Lee