Bartholomew (Badlesmere) de Badlesmere

Bartholomew (Badlesmere) de Badlesmere (abt. 1275 - 1322)

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Sir Bartholomew "1st Lord Badlesmere" de Badlesmere formerly Badlesmere
Born about in Badlesmere, Kent, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married before [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Canterbury, Kent, Englandmap
Profile last modified | Created 11 Mar 2011
This page has been accessed 4,236 times.

Categories: Tong Parish, Kent | Badlesmere Parish, Kent | Knights bachelor | Siege of Stirling Castle.

British Aristocracy
Bartholomew (Badlesmere) de Badlesmere was a member of aristocracy in the British Isles.
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Contents

Biography

Sir Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere, Sheriff of Glamorganshire, Constable of Dover Castle & the Cinque Ports was born circa 1275[1] at of Badlesmere & Snodhurst in Chatham, Kent, England; Age 26 in 1301.[2] [3]

"He fought in the English army both in France and Scotland during the later years of the reign of Edward I. In 1307 he became governor of Bristol Castle, and afterwards Edward II. appointed him steward of his household; but these marks of favor did not prevent him from making a compact with some other noblemen to gain supreme influence in the royal council. Although very hostile to Earl Thomas of Lancaster, Badlesmere helped to make peace between the king and the earl in 1318, and was a member of the middle party which detested alike Edwards minions, like the Despensers, and his violent enemies like Lancaster. The kings conduct, however, drew him to the side of the earl, and he had already joined Edwards enemies when, in October 1321, his wife, Margaret de Clare, refused to admit Queen Isabella to her husbands castle at Leeds in Kent. The king captured the castle, seized and imprisoned Lady Badlesmere, and civil war began. After the defeat of Lancaster at Boroughbridge, Badlesmere was taken and hanged at Canterbury on the 14th of April 1322. His son and heir, Giles, died without children in 1338." [4]


"Bartholomew de Badlesmere, who in the lifetime of his father (22nd Edward I) [1294], received command to attend the king at Portsmouth, upon the 1st day of September, with horse and arms, to embark with him for Gascony, and, in the year that he succeeded to his paternal property, was in the wars of Scotland. He was afterwards in the retinue of Robert de Clifford in the Welsh wars, and in the 1st year of Edward I [1272], was appointed governor of the castle of Bristol. In two years afterwards, he was summoned to parliament as Badlesmere, and had a grant from the king, through the especial influence of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, and Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, of the castle and manor of Chilham, in Kent, for his own and his wife's life, which castle had been possessed by Alexander de Baliol in right of his wife Isabel, and ought to have escheated to the crown upon the decease of the said Alexander by reason of the felony that John de Strabolgi, Earl of Atholl (Isabel's son and heir), who was hanged in the 5th of Edward II [1312], Lord Badlesmere was constituted governor of the castle of Leeds and obtained, at the same time, grants of divers extensive manors. In the next year but one, his lordship was deputed with Otto de Grandison and others, ambassador to the court of Rome, and the next year, upon the death of Robert de Clifford, he obtained a grant of the custody of the castle of Skipton in Yorkshire, whereof the said Robert died possessed, to hold during the minority of Roger de Clifford, his son and heir.

"His lordship was further indebted to the crown for numerous charters for fairs and marts throughout his extensive manors; and he held the high office of steward of the household for a great number of years; but notwithstanding his thus basking in the sunshine of royal favour, his allegiance was not trustworthy, for joining the banner of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and other discontented nobles of that period, he went into Kent without the king's permission; where, being well received, he put himself at the head of some soldiers from his castle at Leeds and then proceeded to Canterbury with 19 knights, having linen jackets under their surcoats, all his esquires being in plate armour, and thus repaired to the shrine of St. Thomas, to the great amazement of the good citizens. While Lord Badlesmere remained at Canterbury, John de Crumwell and his wife sought his lordship's aid, and, pledging himself to afford it, he hastened to Oxford where the barons of his party had been then assembled. In the meantime the king being apprised of the baron's proceedings, despatched the queen to Leeds and, upon admission being denied to her, the castle was regularly invested by Adomere de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, and John de Britannia, Earl of Richmond, to who it eventually surrendered, when Lord Badlesmere's wife, young son, and daughters, all falling into the hands of the besiegers, were sent prisoners to the Tower of London. The baron and his accomplices afterwards were pursued by Edmund, Earl of Kent, and John de Warren, Earl of Surrey, and being defeated and taken prisoners at the battle of Borough-Bridge, his lordship was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Canterbury, and his head set upon a pole at Burgate. At the time of the baron's execution, upwards of ninety lords, knights, and others concerned in the same insurrection suffered a similar fate in various parts of the kingdom. Margaret, his lordship's widow (one of the daus. and co-heiresses of Thomas, 3rd son of Thomas, 2nd son of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester), continued prisoner in the Tower until, through the influence of William Lord Roos, of Hamlake, and others, she obtained her freedom, whereupon taking herself to the nunnery of Minoresses, without Aldgate, in the suburbs of London, she had 2s. a day for her maintenance to be paid by the sheriff of Essex; she subsequently, however, obtained a large proportion of the deceased lord's manors for her dowry. By this lady, Lord Badlesmere left issue. His lordship had been summoned to parliament from 26 October, 1309, to 5 August, 1320. His unhappy fate occurred in 1322." [5][6]

Burial

He was buried at Grey Friars (Friars Minor) Priory, Canterbury, Kent. The friary was dissolved in 1538 in Henry VIII's Dissolution of the Monasteries, with the only surviving building of the complex being the Grey Friars Chapel, where Anglican Franciscans now worship.


Children

They had one son, Giles (2nd Lord Badlesmere), and four daughters: Margery,Maud, Elizabeth and Margaret.[2]

Sources

  1. 18 August 1275 according to Wikidata... I found that the reference came from Italian Wikipedia, but I could not find a link to show me what source supported that fact.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 90-91.
  3. Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 220-221.
  4. 1911 Encyclopedia
  5. Sir Bernard Burke, "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages"
  6. Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 19, Badlesmere, Barons Badlesmere
  • Royal Ancestry 2013 D. Richardson Vol. I p. 220-223
  • Magna Carta Ancestry 2011 2nd ed. Vol. I p. 90-91
  • Sir Bernard Burke, "Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages", Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 19, Badlesmere, Barons Badlesmere]
  • The Phillips, Weber, Kirk and Staggs Families of the Pacific Northwest by Jim Weber -
  • Unknown author, Magna Charta Sureties, 1215, by F. L. Weis, 4th Ed., p. 38; The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, p. 102.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 158-159.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 243-244.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 542.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. II, p. 190-191.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 60.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 191-192.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 202-203.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. III, p. 450-451.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 194-195.
  • Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. IV, p. 267.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 91-92.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 327.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 610-611.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. III, p. 643.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 171-172.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 182-183.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. IV, p. 491-492.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 163.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. V, p. 257.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 422-423.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 310-312.
  • Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 122-123.
  • Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 525.
  • Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. I, p. 423-424.
  • The Stirling Roll of Arms, c. 1304

Acknowledgments

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DNA
No known carriers of Bartholomew's Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA have taken yDNA or mtDNA tests.

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Images: 2
Badlesmere coat of arms
Badlesmere coat of arms

Sir Bathelmew de Badlesmere
Sir Bathelmew de Badlesmere

Collaboration

On 15 Feb 2018 at 20:44 GMT C. Mackinnon wrote:

Suggest observation in place of death is inappropriate. He took up arms against the King.

On 12 Sep 2015 at 01:55 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

Hi! The Magna Carta project's review of a trail looks at all profiles between the Gateway Ancestor (MCGA) & the Magna Carta Surety Baron (MCSB). The trail for MCGAs Elizabeth and Thomas was just reviewed/approved... it passes through Sir Bartholomew's wife. This profile looks pretty good, so I thought I might ask the reviewer to come back and take a look at it also. But too many of the profiles connecting him to a MCSB need sources & additional work before Sir Bartholowmew would be able to be badged. Once those are done, however, give the project a holler - he's good down the trail to the Coytemores!

On 29 Aug 2015 at 15:38 GMT Darlene (Athey) Athey-Hill wrote:

The Magna Carta project is working on all of the descendants/ancestors and places the badge when they feel the profile is 'ready'. So we'll wait for them to make the call. Thanks.

On 29 Aug 2015 at 14:45 GMT Renee Malloy Esq wrote:

Needs MAGNA CARTA Ancestry badge?



Bartholomew is 28 degrees from Sharon Caldwell, 21 degrees from Burl Ives and 17 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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