Suzanne  Barbeau

Suzanne Barbeau (1620 - 1657)

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Suzanne Barbeau aka Barbot
Born in La-Roche-sur-Yon, Vendee, Francemap
Daughter of and
[sibling(s) unknown]
Wife of — married in Québec, Canada, Nouvelle-Francemap
Died in Québec, Canada, Nouvelle-Francemap
Barbeau-292 created 4 Jan 2016 | Last modified | Last edit: 1 Dec 2017
18:29: Andréa Boudreau edited the Marriage Data for Suzanne Barbeau. [Thank Andréa for this | 1 thank-you received]
This page has been accessed 312 times.

Categories: Québec, Canada, Nouvelle-France | Quebecois | French Immigrants to New France | Filles a Marier | Homemakers | Catholics.

Suzanne Barbeau has French origins.
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Suzanne Barbeau migrated from France to New France.
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Suzanne Barbeau lived in New France, in what is now Québec.
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Contents

Biography

Research Notes:

Note: French women generally kept their given surname upon marriage during this period of time. Their children kept their father's surname. [1][2]

Note: The Barbeau surname is also represented as "Barbot" especially in the dit Boisdore family line during 1600-1700 circa in Nouvelle France.

The use depended on who transcribed and wrote the hand written Catholic documents and where the catholic recorders were from in France.

Families rarely edited the catholic registers either without access or they lacked the abilities to read or write.

Nouvelle France Jesuits, Sulpicians or the Recollet translated names differently depending on their language use, surname protestant affiliation, what they thought best and the regional surnames they were most familiar with in France.

The surnames Barbeau and Barbot are extensively found in France, England and the Netherlands prior to Nouvelle France and represent the same and different families.

Note: Barbeau, Barbot, Barbaud and Barbeaux have the same sound when French pronounced. Baraboo-1 11:19, 24 October 2017 (EDT) [3]


Filles A Marier Excerpt:

" Most of us are familiar with the story of the King's Daughters or Fille Du Roi; the state sponsored program that brought almost 800 single women to Quebec in the early days of the French settlement, but what is not so well known is the story of the Fille a Marier. Between 1634 and 1662; 262 young ladies braved the elements to begin an uncertain future in the backwoods of Canada.

When the Company of 100 Associates began their settlement scheme, their plan of recruiting only families proved to be too costly, so instead they signed on single men; tradesman and labourers; who would be indentured for three years. However, this meant that more than 80% of the colonists were men, so even if they decided to stay at the end of their term, there was little hope of them starting a family, unless they chose a Canadian girl. But, since her family would never allow her, or her children, to leave their village; the company directors needed to avoid this from happening.

So instead, they began recruiting "marriagable young girls", who would first sign a contract in France and then be given passage and a small dowry to become the wife of a Quebec settler. You might wonder why these young girls (many under 16), would risk the dangers and hardships, which by now most of France were well aware of; but believe it or not; for many it was the best option.

At the time, marriages were arranged, so if the girl's family did not have the means to provide a sutable dowry, her only option was to become a nun, if she was Catholic; or marry beneath her station. In the case of the young Filles a Marier, though a marriage contract must be signed before departure, she had every right to refuse the union, once she met her husband-to-be. As a matter of fact, many of them did just that, and were provided safe passage home.

Below is a list of all the women brought over under this plan. Some were sponsored by their church, a company associate or merchant. Others were of minor noble families; cousins or sisters of men already in the colony. Marguerite Bourgeoys and Jeanne Mance, also escorted several, training them in the necessary domestic skills, and ensuring that they would be well looked after. Later, critics of the plan tried to say that all the girls were prostitutes taken off the streets of Paris, but this was rarely, if ever, the case. Most settled down, raised families and formed the roots of many French-Canadian families. " [4]

Family Information

" A Marriageable Young Girl

Suzanne Barbeau (1620-1657)

Suzanne Barbeau was born about 1620, at La-Roche-sur-Yon, Vendee, France; the daughter of Jean Barbeau and Jeanne Rabouin.

She arrived in the Quebec Colony as a Filles A Marier, contracted to be the bride of Jean Noel. They were married on November 02, 1649 at Notre-Dame-de-Québec, Quebec city.

Suzanne and Jean had four children before her death on November 14, 1657. The following year Jean married Jeanne Yvon and died himself on July 05, 1690.

Children

The Next Generation

Jacques Noel - Was born on August 10, 1650 at Ville De Quebec and died on January 01, 1665 in Sillery.

Jean Noel II - Was born on July 02, 1652 at Ville De Quebec and died unknown. He was married twice; the first to Marguerite Sel and then Madeleine Donnets with whom he had a daughter.

Antoine Noel - Was born on May 31, 1655 at Ville De Quebec and died unknown.

Pierre Noel - Was born on June 24, 1657 at Ville De Quebec and died unknown. " [5][6]

Sources

  1. [( https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coutume_de_Paris)]
  2. [( http://www.genealogie.umontreal.ca/en/NomsEtPrenoms)]
  3. [(The French Language in the Seventeenth Century: Contemporary Opinion in France By Peter Rickard)]
  4. [(http://www.oocities.org/weallcamefromsomewhere/Kebec/filles_marier.html)]
  5. [(http://www.oocities.org/weallcamefromsomewhere/Kebec/suzanne_barbeau.html)]
  6. [(http://www.nosorigines.qc.ca/GenealogieQuebec.aspx?pid=94416)]


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Images: 3
Suzanne Barbot Image 1
Suzanne Barbot Image 1

Filles A Marier 1634 - 1663
Filles A Marier 1634 - 1663

French Barbeau Cornflower Circa 1100 to Present
French Barbeau Cornflower Circa 1100 to Present

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Suzanne is 32 degrees from Aaron Copland, 26 degrees from AJ Jacobs, 22 degrees from Barbara Shoff and 21 degrees from Queen Elizabeth II Windsor on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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