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Welf Guelph (Bayern) Welf (1040 - 1101)

Welf Guelph (Welf Guelph I) "Guelph, Duke of Bavaria" Welf formerly Bayern aka Este
Born in Este, Padua, Veneto, Italymap
Ancestors ancestors
Brother of [half] and [half]
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Husband of — married 1071 (to 5 Mar 1094) [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died in Paphos, Cyprusmap
Profile last modified | Created 31 May 2012 | Last significant change: 21 May 2020
05:30: Tamara Killian posted a comment on the page for Welf Guelph (Bayern) Welf (1040-1101) [Thank Tamara for this]
This page has been accessed 2,912 times.
Welf Guelph I (Bayern) Welf has German Roots.

Welf I [Este] (1030/40 - 09 Nov 1101).[1]

Contents

Titles

  • Duke of Bavaria[2]


European Aristocracy
Welf Guelph I Bayern was a member of the aristocracy in Europe.


Parents

  • Father: Alberto Azzo II, Marchese d'Este
  • Mother: Kunigunde von Altdorf

Marriage

m. (1071) Judith of Flanders.[3]

Tracking Notes

GEDCOM: Welf IV, Duke of Bavaria Burial: Weingarten Abbey

Sources

"Judith of Flanders." The Henry Project.[4]


Searle, W.G. (1899). Anglo-Saxon Bishops, Kings, and Nobles: The Succession of the Bishops and the Pedigrees of the Kings and Nobles, (pp.358-9). London: Cambridge University Press. archive.org


Wikipedia: Judith of Flanders

MEDIEVAL LANDS: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families by Charles Cawley © Foundation for Medieval Genealogy & Charles Cawley 2000-2018.

Research Notes

2019 Spring C-a-T

Error 723 (prefix in 1st name) corrected, according to guidance @ https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Help:Name_Fields_for_European_Aristocrats

Fields changed

FieldOriginalChange
Prefix
Proper FNWelf Guelph I-IVWelf
Preferred FNWelf Guelph I-IVWelf I
O. NicknamesGuelph, Duke of Bavariaok
Middle Name
LNABBayernok
CLNWelfok
OLNEsteok
Suffix

Other Comments to the Profie Mgr

His FN in WT was originally Welf Guelph I-IV. The "IV" has been "lost"in the shuffle, as the Preferred FN already has a #. In any event, the "IV" comes from the genealogy of the Elder House, where he was counted as Welf IV, otherwise he was known as Welf I, see info @ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_I,_Duke_of_Bavaria

Saunders-3874 16:49, 26 April 2019 (UTC)



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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welf_I,_Duke_of_Bavaria

"When his father-in-law, Duke Otto, had become an enemy of Emperor Henry IV and forfeited his duchy, Welf remained loyal to Henry IV. In compliance with Henry's commands, he repudiated and divorced his wife, Ethelinde.

After his divorce from his first wife in 1070, Welf married Judith of Flanders,[2] [3] daughter of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders and widow of Tostig Godwinson, Earl of Northumbria. In 1089, Welf's son Welf married Matilda of Tuscany, thus strengthening relationships with the pope. However, after the younger Welf divorced Matilda in 1095, Welf made amends with Henry IV and was reconfirmed in his position as Duke of Bavaria. After the death of his father Azzo in 1097, Welf tried to acquire his father's property south of the Alps, but did not succeed against his younger half-brother Fulco.

In 1099, Welf joined what would become known as the Crusade of 1101, along with William IX of Aquitaine, Hugh of Vermandois and Ida of Austria. His main success was to prevent a clash between fellow Crusaders, who had been pillaging Byzantine territory on their way to Constantinople and the Byzantine emperor's Pecheneg mercenaries.

The Crusade itself, entering Anatolia, ended disastrously; after passing Heraclea in September, Welf's Bavarians—like other crusader contingents—were ambushed and massacred by the Turkish troops of Kilij Arslan I, the Seljuq Sultan of Rûm. Welf himself escaped the fiasco, but died on his way back in Paphos, Cyprus, in 1101 and was buried in Weingarten Abbey. He was succeeded as Duke of Bavaria by his son Welf II."

posted by Tamara Killian

Welf Guelph I is 28 degrees from Jaki Erdoes, 23 degrees from Wallis Windsor and 14 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.