John Brockett

John Brockett (abt. 1613 - 1690)

Privacy Level: Open (White)
John Brockett
Born about in Englandmap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married (to about ) in St. Michaels, Hertford, Englandmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut Colonymap
Profile last modified | Created 26 Jul 2011
This page has been accessed 1,851 times.

Categories: Hector, sailed 1637 | Signers of the New Haven Fundamental Agreement | New Haven, New Haven Colony | Wallingford, Connecticut Colony | Puritan Great Migration.

NOTE: This profile is currently being revised. Please use the g2g discussion thread linked to (near upper right corner of this page) to ask questions and discuss concerns. THANK YOU.
The Puritan Great Migration.
John Brockett migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
Join: Puritan Great Migration Project
Discuss: pgm

Contents

Disputed Origins

Nineteenth and early 20th century genealogies have claimed that the immigrant John Brockett of New Haven was son of John Brocket and Mary Bannister.

Others say that "The tradition has existed for two hundred years in New Haven, that John Brockett was the eldest son of Sir John Brockett, of Brocket Hill, Hertsfordshire, England; that on account of his Puritanical ideas, his father (who was knighted by Queen Elizabeth), disinherited him, and that John then gave up all claims to the title and the estates of the Brocketts in England, in order to join the Puritan Band which came with the Rev. John Davenport to America."[1]

"In one of the Connecticut religious papers, published in 1868,[citation needed] the following is found: "John Brockett, the eldest son of Sir John Brockett, of the county of Herts, Eng., who was a well known loyalist of the time of Charles I, becoming convinced of the truth of the Gospel as preached by the Puritans, relinquished his birthright and all his prospects of honor and tame, joined himself to the little company of Rev. John Davenport, grated to New England and settled at New Haven in 1637. Of him, of Moses, it could be said that he preferred to suffer affliction with people of God than to enjoy the pleasures of Sin for a season.""

Raymond W. Madsen, in 1999, argued for parentage of immigrant John Brocket, disproving previously published claims about him.[2]

Madsen demonstrated how the immigrant could not have been the son of JohnBrockett and Mary Bannister, and points out that the John Brockett baptized in 1611 died in 1628/9. The author makes that case that the immigrant to New England was son of John Brockett of Mackrey End and his first wife Joan Lacon, baptized 29 July 1612, was the John Brocket, age 21, who matriculated from Cambridge University in 1634, and he who married Mary Blackwell 14 August 1635 at Sandridge.

However, researchers associated with The Broket Archive found that John Brocket and his wife Mary Bannister remained in England, and died there in 1662. This website concludes that the immigrant's parents and origins remain unknown.

See "Discussion of Sources" below for more information.

Biography

John Brocket, origins unknown, came as a single man, likely on the Hector with others following Rev. John Davenport, arriving Boston June 26, 1637 and settled New Haven, Connecticut.

John Brocket of New Haven, a surveyor, moved to Wallingford. He died there March 12, 1689/90 at the age of 77. He had 8 children:[3]

  1. John, bp 31 Dec 1642 at the First Cong. Soc. of New Haven.[3]
  2. Be Fruitful, bp. 23 Feb 1644 at the First Cong. Soc. of New Haven; died young.[3]
  3. Benjamin, bp 23 Feb 1644 at the First Cong. Soc. of New Haven; d. 22 May 1679 in New Haven.[3]
  4. Mary, bp 28 Sep 1646at the First Cong. Soc. of New Haven. m. Ephraim Pennington[3]
  5. Silence, bp 3 June 1648 at the First Cong. Soc. of New Haven; m. Joseph Bradley[3]
  6. Abigail, b. 10 Mar 1649/50 bp 24 Mar 1650 at the First Cong. Soc. of New Haven; m. John Payne.[3]
  7. Samuel, b. 14 Jan 1651, bp 16 Jan 1651 at the First Cong. Soc. of New Haven; d. 26 Oct 1742; m. Sarah Bradley.[3];
  8. Jabez b. 24 Oct 1654; m. Dorothy Lyman[3]

Notes

The following is an excerpt from the Townsend Family Genealogy book. [4][5] The claims made here should be confirmed by original sources.

"JOHN BROCKETT, the first person of the name of Brockett, of whom any record can be found in this country, was born in England in 1609 [wrong; based on his age at death, he was born about 1613], and came to America in 1637, probably in the ship Hector, with the Rev. John Davenport, and Theophilus Eaton, which ship arrived in Boston on June 26, 1637. The list of passengers on the vessel was never published, and, for prudential reasons, its clearance never appeared in the records of any English port so far as it can be ascertained. In regard to the persons who accompanied Rev. John Davenport to this country, and who joined him in the settlement of New Haven, G. H. Hollister, in his History of Connecticut, says “They were gentlemen of wealth and character, with their servants and household effects. They were, for the most part, from London and had been bred to mercantile and commercial pursuits. Their coming was hailed at Boston with much joy, for they were the most opulent of all the companies who had emigrated to New England."
NOTE: The Broket Archives points out that John of New Haven was not styled "Mr." as were many others who came on the Hector, that the taxes he paid suggested he owned far less property than his Hector peers, and that while literate and likely educated, there is no evidence he was a "gentleman of wealth."
“Shortly after the arrival of the Hector, and the accompanying ship in Boston, Eaton and a few others, unwilling to join the Massachusetts Colony, explored the coast of Long Island Sound, selecting a tract of land near the Quinipiac River, the present site of the city of New Haven, on which they left seven of their number."
"In the spring of 1638, (April, 13), Davenport with others, among whom was John Brockett, followed. They purchased land at Quinipiac of the Indians and “taking the Bible as their guide”, formed an independent government or Plantation Covenant, upon strictly religious principles. Prosperity attended them and they laid the foundations of a town called New Haven."
"John Brockett seems to have been one of the leading men of the company, as his name appears more often in the records of New Haven Colony than any other man in civil life, except that of Theophilus Eaton."
See indented commentary above that suggests otherwise.
"He had a widely extended reputation as a Civil Engineer and Surveyor, and in June, 1639, laid out the large Square (which is the center of the City of New Haven, including the Commons and the Site of the College buildings) in nine equal sections. Mention is made in the Colonial Records of the perfection of this work, especially of the angles. The same boundaries still continue to be used."
"A few years later, the Governor of New Jersey deputed John Brockett to "lay out, survey, and bound the said bounds of Elizabeth Towne, (now the City of Elizabeth), the planting fields, town lots, and to lay out every particular man’s proposition according to his allotments and the directions of and disputes concerning the same, having had certain notice of the good experience, knowledge, skill and faithfulness of John Brockett in the surveying and laying out of land.""
"The work was performed by John Brockett, and an allotment of land was made to him in the town of Elizabeth, which he held until 1670, when the record of its Sale to Samuel Hopkins appears. In order to perform this work, John Brockett removed temporarily to Elizabethtown and was constituted May 26, 1668. The town had chosen John Ogden, Sr,. and John Brockett to represent them in the House of Burgess."[6]
"He died 1690. His burial is in Montoweese Cem[etary], near North Haven , [Connecticut]. There is very little of the official record, in this country [United States], concerning his birth."

...

"John Brockett died in Wallingford, Conn., March 12, 1690, aged [??] years. His will, made nine days before his death, is available."[7] He had eight children. His wife's name is not known.
While some believe that the immigrant was he who married Mary Blackwell on August 14, 1635, at St. Michaels, Hertford, England, subsequent research has demonstrated that that couple remained in England and died without issue.

Discussion of Sources

There has not been much published in peer-reviewed journals about John Brocket(t) of New Haven, Connecticut. He arrived too late for Anderson's Great Migration series.

That said, Brockett.Info The Broket Archive appears to be the best compilation of Brockett-related genealogy information, a compilation of the analysis of the origins of Brocketts (then Broket) in England, with an extensive page devoted to trying to find the origins of John Brockett of New Haven.

Additional sources include:

  • Edward J. Brockett, "The Descendants of John Brockett, One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony: Illustrated with Portraits and Armorial Bearings - AN HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION - Relating to the Settlement of New Haven and Wallingford, Connecticut - THE ENGLISH BROCKETTS ""A pedigree of Brockett,"" Published in England in 1860 - Compiled By (1905)" Available in electronic form at https://archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc. ADD SUMMARY OF HIS FINDINGS ABOUT BROCKETT HERE. E.J. Brockett lists 10 children for John Brockett. In addition to the 8 listed by Jacobus, Brockett shows two named Benjamin (one a twin of 'Be Fruitful', born and died in 1645, and another Benjamin born in 1648); and two named Jabez (one born and died in 1654, and another Jabez born in 1656). No sources have been found for the additional two sons. Both Jacobus (Families of Ancient New Haven) and Torrey (New England Marriages to 1700, page 209) show the marriages of Benjamin and Jabez related to the earlier sons (born 1645 and 1654) and no record of a Benjamin born in 1648 or a Jabez born in 1656.
  • Donald Lines Jacobus (compiler). Families of Ancient New Haven, Vol I-VIII. and Index Vol IX New Haven: 1931. Reprint, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974, 1981, 1997. Originally published as New Haven Genealogical Magazine, Volumes I-VIII. Rome, NY and New Haven, CT 1922-1932. In particular, see Vol II, pages 323-324 (Brockett Family). ADD SUMMARY OF HIS FINDINGS ABOUT BROCKETT HERE. Jacobus deals with children facts, naming 8 children. They have been summarized in the children's section above
  • Raymond W. Madsen A.G., Brockett Family of England ((John Brockett and Mary Blackwell); written 29 December 1999, updating a 1978 published article by the same author, “A Case Study of the Brockett Family in Colonial America and England." Madsen concludes that John Brockett of New Haven was baptized 29 July 1612, Jn s. Mr. Jn Brocket, Mackrey End, and was also the John Brocket, age 21, who matriculated from Cambridge University in 1634, and he who married Mary Blackwell 14 August 1635 at Sandridge. However, researchers associated with The Broket Archive found that that John Brocket and his wife Mary remained in England, and died there in 1662.
  • Allen Brockett Townsend, "Ch 10: Brockett First Generation" in The Townsend Family Genealogy. 1st ed. Oak Ridge, TN. n.p., Oct. 1991. Pg 59-61. Print. A complete and authentic history of and a delineation of the ancestors of Gilbert Lee Townsend (1882-1951) and the descendants of Robert Townsend (1819-1899). Self-published and distributed among descendants, this 300+ page book is rare. Kopel-16 has a copy and is willing to collaborate. ADD SUMMARY OF HIS FINDINGS ABOUT BROCKETT HERE. May be the source for the supposed 1609 birth.

Sources

  1. Townsend, Allen Brockett. "Ch 10 Brockett First Generation" in The Townsend Family Genealogy. 1st ed. Oak Ridge, TN. n.p., Oct. 1991. Pg 59-61. Print. A complete and authentic history of and a delineation of the ancestors of Gilbert Lee Townsend (1882-1951) and the descendants of Robert Townsend (1819-1899). Self-published and distributed among descendants, this 300+ page book is rare. Kopel-16 has a copy and is willing to collaborate. OR "The Descendants of John Brockett, One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony: Illustrated with Portraits and Armorial Bearings - AN HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION - Relating to the Settlement of New Haven and Wallingford, Connecticut - THE ENGLISH BROCKETTS ""A pedigree of Brockett,"" Published in England in 1860 - Compiled By Edward J. Brockett (1905)" Available in electronic form at https://archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc This source needs checking.
  2. Raymond W. Madsen, Brockett Family of New England (online article; accessed 30 May 2016), dated 29 December 1991
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Jacobus, Donald Lines (compiler). Families of Ancient New Haven, Vol I-VIII. and Index Vol IX New Haven: 1931. Reprint, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1974, 1981, 1997. Originally published as New Haven Genealogical Magazine, Volumes I-VIII. Rome, NY and New Haven, CT 1922-1932.
  4. Townsend, Allen Brockett. "Ch 10 Brockett First Generation" in The Townsend Family Genealogy. 1st ed. Oak Ridge, TN. n.p., Oct. 1991. Pg 59-61. Print. A complete and authentic history of and a delineation of the ancestors of Gilbert Lee Townsend (1882-1951) and the descendants of Robert Townsend (1819-1899). Self-published and distributed among descendants, this 300+ page book is rare. Kopel-16 has a copy and is willing to collaborate.
  5. "The Descendants of John Brockett, One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony: Illustrated with Portraits and Armorial Bearings - AN HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION - Relating to the Settlement of New Haven and Wallingford, Connecticut - THE ENGLISH BROCKETTS ""A pedigree of Brockett,"" Published in England in 1860 - Compiled By Edward J. Brockett (1905)" Available in electronic form at https://archive.org/details/descendantsofjoh00inbroc
  6. ibid. Facsimile reprint, Higginson Books, Inc.
  7. ibid. [which?]


More Genealogy Tools



Sponsored by MyHeritage




Search
Searching for someone else?
First: Last:



DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with John by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with John:

Have you taken a DNA test for genealogy? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.



Images: 1
John Brockett Image 1
John Brockett Image 1

Collaboration

On 1 Jun 2016 at 12:28 GMT Jillaine Smith wrote:

Profile managers and trusted list folks, PLEASE read and participate in the g2g thread listed above, aimed at cleaning up what are currently very incorrect set of profiles concerning the Brockett/Broket line. Thank you.

On 1 Jun 2016 at 12:27 GMT Jillaine Smith wrote:

An even better source than wheathamstead.net/brockett is The Broket Archive.

On 6 Jan 2014 at 12:12 GMT Toby Rockwell wrote:

You may be interested in the following information:

http://www.wheathampstead.net/brockett/

This indicates that the lineage of the immigrant John Brockett may be in error.



John is 17 degrees from Judy Garland, 18 degrees from Mindy Silva and 14 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

B  >  Brockett  >  John Brockett