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Nicholas Busby (abt. 1587 - abt. 1657)

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Nicholas Busby
Born about in Norwich, Norfolk, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Brother of and [half]
Husband of — married 24 Jun 1605 in St. Mary Coslany, Norwich, Norfolk, Englandmap
Descendants descendants
Died about in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts Baymap
Profile last modified 14 Sep 2019 | Created 18 Feb 2011
This page has been accessed 1,756 times.
The Puritan Great Migration.
Nicholas Busby migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
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Contents

Biography

Birth

Nicholas Busby was of Norwich, Norfolk, England, born about 1587. [1]

Immigration

Nicholas Busby prepared to immigrate by selling his tenement in Norwich, England, to another weaver. [2] He also sold his house lot in Norwich, but he brought his looms and the tools of his trade with him to Massachusetts. [3]
Nicholas Busby brought his family with him to New England, including his daughter Anne and her husband William Nickerson and their four children, except for his married daughter Catherine, who remained in England. [4] They traveled together from Norwich to the port of Great Yarmouth, where they embarked on the ship Rose. [5]
In his landmark book Planters of the Commonwealth, 1620 - 1640, Charles Edward Banks states on page 184 that passengers on the Rose of Yarmouth, William Andrews, Jr., Master, and the John and Dorothy of Ipswich, William Andrews, Master, both sailed from Ipswich and that their is no way to separate which ship held which passengers.[6] Note that the master of the Rose is the son of the master of the John and Dorothy, and that both ships arrived together on June 8 at Boston [citing Gov. Winthrop's journal, vol I, page 222].
Nicholas Busby immigrated to New England where he first settled in Newbury, Massachusetts, a newly formed town, where he received a certificate of admission on 16 Nov 1637. [7] He next is recorded in Watertown, Massachusetts, purchasing land by 9 April 1638. [8]
No record for Edmond Sherman is found in New England after 1637,the same year that Nicholas Busby arrived. Busby received a grant in the Town plot on 9 April 1638... Examination of the Composite Inventory shows us that he had in fact purchased, in late 1637 or early 1638, the share earlier held by Ward and Sherman. [9]
In the 1644 Watertown Inventory of Possessions and Composite Inventory, Nicholas Busby held the homestall that had been granted to Andrew Ward, and the Great Dividend, Beaverbrook Plowland and Remote Meadows lots that had been granted to Edmond Sherman... Edmond Sherman purchased the homestall of Andrew Ward ... in 1635... after which Sherman received further grants of land... and that Nicholas Busby purchased all these parcels of land from Sherman. This latter purchase must have taken place by 9 April 1638, when Busby was granted six acres at the Town Plot, again based on the proprietary share attached to the homestall that had come from Ward by way of Sherman. [10]

Occupation

Nicholas Busby was a "worsted weaver", known for his skill among a city of weavers in Norwich, England. (see his will below). [11] From being a city dweller supported by his craft in Norwich, Nicholas went to owning land in a small town, his time taken up with farming, and weaving only part time. [12] He purchased a house and garden on about half an acre in Boston from Edmund Jacklin on 22 August 1646. [13] In Boston "he opened a dry-goods shop and continued to weave part-time. [14] At the time of his death he had six pounds worth of Cloth in the Looms." [15]

Offices

Nicholas Busby served as "jurat" for the city of Norwich, England. A "jurat" examined Norwich produced cloth, ensuring that the civic standards of manufacture for a the city famed for its weaving were maintained. [16]
On 13 March 1647, Nicholas Busby was a Constable of Boston, Massachusetts. [17]

Marriage

Nicholas Busbye married Bridgett Cocke at St Mary Caslany, Norwich, Norfolk, England, June 24, 1605, (Phillimore's Norfolk Mar. vol 3, page 5)[18]

Will of Nicholas Busby

From office of Suffolk Registry of Probate, Boston, the will of Nicholas Busby dated 25 Jul 1657, presented, 10 Sep 1657 and recorded 14 Oct 1657:
"In the name of God amen I Nicholas Busby being sicke in body but in pfect memory, Blessed be ye Lord therefor doe make this my Last Testament as hereafter followeth first of all I will and bequeath my soule into the mercyfull hands of Almightie God trusting & unfainedly beleeving to be saved by ye active & passive obedience of the Lord Jesus Christ & my Body to the earth to be buryed therein at the charge of my Executrix heereafter named. I doe appointe my three sonns that are here in New England, that is to say, my Sonne Abraham Busby, my sonne William Nickerson & my Sonne John Grout to gather vp all my debts mentioned in my debt bookes & to make there of a true accott, & to deliuer it as they shall receiue it vuto my Executrix heereafter named....Impris I doe make my Loving wife my whole Executrix of all my Estate, & to possesse this my dwelling house wherein I liue, dureing her life, and all my household Stuffe plate & money; & for my farme if she will consent therto that it be sold & she to receiue the price thereof & to add to it my stocke & to discharge the seurall Legacies.....the Remainder.....to be for her maintenance dureing her life.....Vnto John Busby, my Eldest Sonne, seaventy pounds more then that I sent him the Last yeare, wch was thirtie pounds, & this Seaventy pounds to be payd in such goods as are gathered in by the Brethren above said, within Seaven monthes after my decease.....Vnto Abraham Busby, my Sonne, sixtie pounds.....And after his Mothers decease, this my now dwelling house, with the garden & fruite trees scittuated & being in Boston.....Vuto Anne Nickerson, my daughter, the sume of fiftie pounds; (more then that I sent her the Last yeare).....Vnto Sarah Grout, my youngest daughter, the some of Sixtie & five pounds; vnto my grand Child Joseph Busby, Sonne of my Sonne Nicholas Busby, deceased, the sume of Twenty pounds; vnto Sarah Grout, my grand child, tenn pounds; vnto my two Sonns John Busby & Abraham Busby, my printed bookes, in manner following; to John Busby, all my Phisicke bookes, as Glendall practice, Barrowes method, Dutch Phisicke & garden of health, Mr. Coggans treatis, and the Dialogue of Phisicke Surgery, with Plinnys Naturall Hystory. Vnto Abraham Busby, my bookes of Divinitie, vizt. Mr. Perkins, Mr Willet sinops and Comentary on the Romains, & mr Hieroms two bookes; as for the rest of my bookes of divinitie, or Hystory, my desire is that they may Loveingly & Brotherly devide them betweene except the three Bibles; first, the thicke Bible, I giue vnto Anne Nickerson. The Best Bible, to Sarah Grout, and the bible in my Hamper, to Katherin Savory. As for my Apparell, I giue vnto John Busby, my Sonne, my blacke Stuffe Cloake, & the remainder of my apparell I Leave to my wife to dispose of. As for my weaving tooles, as the two Loomes, the one, I giue to John Busby in case he come over to New England, or else to William Nickerson the same. And the other Loome & warpins & bobings & wheels & shetells & other Implemts thereto belonging I give vnto my Sonne Abraham Busby; And as for my household stuffe, plate & money, I leaue vnto my deare wife....I haue heereunto set my hand & seale, this five and Twentieth day of July, One thousand Sixe Hundred fifty and Seauen...." [19]


Sources

  1. Boston, MA: Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630-1822
  2. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, page 51
  3. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, page 52
  4. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, page 14
  5. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, page 14
  6. The Planters of the Commonwealth in Massachusetts, 1620-1640, by Charles Edward Banks (1930), pages 184, 187
  7. Great Migration Newsletter, V.1-20, page 618
  8. Great Migration Newsletter, V.1-20, page 345
  9. Great Migration Newsletter, V.1-20, page 345
  10. Great Migration 1634-1635, R-S
  11. Great Migration 1634-1635, I-L
  12. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, page 138
  13. Great Migration 1634-1635, I-L, page 10
  14. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, page 138
  15. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, page 138
  16. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, page 14
  17. Boston, MA: Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630-1822
  18. New Englanders in Nova Scotia Manuscript
  19. The Busbee Busby and Variations Database - Will Records All Rights Reserved Copyright 2002 - Busbee Busby Administrators, added 2013 Nov 24 by Michelle
  • Boston, MA: Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630-1822, (Thwing Collection). Inhabitants and Estates of the Town of Boston, 1630–1800 and The Crooked and Narrow Streets of Boston, 1630–1822. CD-ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014.) Nicholas Busby
  • Great Migration Newsletter, V.1-20. (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.) page 345, page 618
  • Great Migration 1634-1635, R-S. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012.) Originally published as: The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume VI, R-S, by Robert Charles Anderson. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009. Nicholas Busby, page 286
  • Great Migration 1634-1635, I-L. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume IV, I-L, by Robert Charles Anderson. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2005. Nicholas Busbie was a worsted weaver.
See also:
  • New Englanders in Nova Scotia Manuscript. R. Stanton Avery Special Collections, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, MA. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2010.) Nicholas Busby and William Nickerson Use this source with caution, as it contains errors.


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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Nicholas by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Nicholas:

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On 13 Sep 2016 at 20:05 GMT April (Dellinger) Dauenhauer wrote:

Marcel, I love it that you asked your question about which ship the Busby and the Nickerson families sailed on, whether the Rose or the John and Dorothy.

The Planters of the Commonwealth in Massachusetts, 1620-1640, by Charles Edward Banks, which contains data on 3,600 passengers who sailed on 213 ships, extracted from the Custom House records of English ports, lists Busby's family on page 184, and Nickerson's family on page 187.

" John and Dorothyof Ipswich, William Andrews, Master"

and

" Rose of Yarmouth, William Andrews, Jr., Master"

"The following named passengers sailed in these two ships from Ipswich and arrived June 8 at Boston. It is not possible to allocate to either ship, and they are combined..."

I'll add source, text and footnotes to each profile.

On 13 Sep 2016 at 18:49 GMT Marcel Muise wrote:

This profile says he sailed on the ROSE with daughter and husband William Nickerson, while William's profile says they sailed on the JOHN AND DOROTHY. Which is correct?

On 20 Apr 2015 at 13:43 GMT Katherine (Alvis) Patterson wrote:

Buzby-10 and Busby-36 are not ready to be merged because: Different dates

On 20 Apr 2015 at 04:35 GMT Kent Bream wrote:

Buzby-10 and Busby-36 appear to represent the same person because: See will within profile of [Busby-36] to see name of son John [Buzby-9].


Rejected matches › John Buzby (aft.1594-aft.1689)

Nicholas is 16 degrees from Carroll Shelby, 24 degrees from Joan Whitaker and 12 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.