Archibald Campbell

Archibald Campbell (abt. 1748 - 1839)

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Archibald Campbell
Born about in Kintyre, Argyle, Scotlandmap
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married about 1775 in Iredell County, North Carolinamap
Descendants descendants
Died in Iredell County, North Carolina, United Statesmap
Profile last modified 21 Nov 2018 | Created 31 Mar 2011
This page has been accessed 1,448 times.
Archibald Campbell served North Carolina during the American Revolution
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Contents

Biography

Archibald Campbell was born on Mar 17, 1748 in (probably) Argyll County, Scotland.[1] in Kintyre, Argyle, Scotland. He died on Jun 2, 1839 in Iredell County, North Carolina and was buried at the Snow Creek Methodist Church in Harmony, Iredell County.[2]

Archibald married Jane Evans, circa 1775, in (prob) Delaware. Jane EVANS. Born, 1752, in (probably) Delaware. She died on 20 MAY 1839, in Iredell Co., NC and was buried at the Snow Creek Methodist Church Cemetery, Iredell County, North Carolina.

Their children were[3]:

  1. James Campbell (1777-1837) (father of Dr. Bob Campbell, and great grandfather of Dr. Reuben)
  2. Flora Campbell (1783-1869), married John Crook Love
  3. Esther Campbell (1784-1867), married Robert Allen
  4. George Campbell (1787-1860), married Elizabeth
  5. Abraham Howard Campbell (1788-?), never married (Born, 1788, in Stokes Co., NC. Died in Watauga Ca., NC. Burial in Watauga County, NC. Abraham was mentally disadvantaged (the Census cruelly described him as "an idiot"). He lived part of his lifetime with a relative in Watauga County.
  6. Elizabeth Jane Campbell (1790-1874), married Matthew Mecum.
  7. Milton Campbell (1793-1860), married Margaret Smith

Family Roots

The name "Campbell" means crooked mouth - from "cam", crooked, and "beul", the mouth. The family can be traced to the beginning of the fifth century, and are said to have been possessed of Lochore in Argyleshire in the time of Fergus II. Sir Colin Campbell of Lochore, temp. Robert Bruce, was called Sir Colin More, or great.

In the church register of Kilmartin County Argyle, Scotland, we find the name Archibald Campbell, son of Alexander Campbell and Anne McIntyre, christened 26 March 1748. This appears to be about the proper age for christening in the Church of Scotland to have been our Archibald Campbell, although Campbell family tradition states his parents' names were Archibald Campbell and Flora Morrison.

Furthermore, family tradition claims that Archibald was born on lithe Island of Kintyre", then recites in detail how he was a son of a Duke of Argyle and was "deposed of his rightful heritage by a mean old uncle who wanted the dukedom." This isn't even the way Duke of Argyle appointments were made. The duke was appointed to please the king, and involved exchange of lots of money. In a few instances the Dukes of Argyle weren't even Scotsmen, they were Englishmen!

Continuing with the tradition, young Archibald was supposed to have left Scotland under threat of his life with his parents and Siblings, and headed for America. Somewhere along the Atlantic route Archibald lost either 1) his father, or 2) his young sister, or 3) his young brother, who was buried at sea. Whoever was lost at sea, if any at all, depends on the person who has repeated the tale. Other tradition states that his mother was widowed before emigrating, that she remarried in Delaware to the man who befriended them because they were broke and destitute, and that Arch had only the one sister (died at sea) and no brother. Probably the only truth in all this tradition is that they immigrated at New Kent County, Delaware, and were broke and destitute, as most immigrants were.

Arch married Jane Evans probably in Delaware and eventually migrated to North Carolina in the "Year money died". Some folks have trouble determining just what year this was. In 1784 continental currency became utterly worthless, or "money died". This is probably the year Arch and his family came to North Carolina and settled on Town Fork Creek, Stokes County, just north and west of Germanton, former county seat of Stokes. In 1818, Campbell sold off a part of his land on Lick Branch of Town Fork Creek. But this did not mark his departure for Iredell County as he was still listed in the 1830 Census of Stokes County, and his name appeared on the register of members of Love's Methodist Church in Walkertown, NC, in 1836. He moved in with his son Milton probably sometime after 1836.

Archibald and Jane may have sojourned a season in Virginia. There is conflicting evidence that their son James was born in Virginia rather than in Delaware. He may have been the "Archibald Campbell who was run out of Bedford County, Virginia, for being a Tory." Where he resided and what he was doing is no matter of record. He was good at covering his tracks, leaving minimal records only of himself before he showed up in Stokes County.

Archibald educated himself sufficiently that he could serve as legal advisor and counselor to his relatives and neighbors, One source states that he was "county engineer" and did survey work. Whatever work he involved himself with, his name appears frequently in the legal records of Stokes County. The Campbells were neighbors of the Vanhoys, who migrated from Kent County, Delaware, to Town Fork, and possibly one of them was the relative whom Campbell was seeking upon leaving Delaware. Archibald was living with his son Milton when he died. Milton Campbell Family Bible records give Archibald's birth date but not his birth place.

Letter to John Milton Campbell

The following letter[4], given the compiler by Mrs. R.H. Saxton, a relative, was written to John Milton Campbell by Aunt Margaret Campbell Floyd's son, John A. Floyd, on June 18, 1905. At that time he was living in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter was copied by Mrs. Ethel Campbell Clements, sister to J.M. Campbell, and mailed to Jessie Campbell Davis, daughter of Harlan A. Campbell, another brother of Mrs. Clements:

"Dear Cousin John,

"I was pleased to receive your letter of recent date which I found in my room upon my return from my vacation a week ago. I take advantage of the first opportunity that I have had to reply.

"I am glad to relate such facts of the history of our ancestor, Archibald Campbell as I have learned and remember. I have learned what I know of him principally from my mother. I visited my aunt Mrs. Feimster two years ago and asked her and her family about this history. Our grandfather Milton Campbell's family Bible is in the possession of my aunt and in it are recorded not only the dates of the births of his own children but of his father and mother and his brothers and sisters as well, and from the record I learn that our great grandfather Archibald Campbell was born March 17, 1748. My mother says he was born upon the island of Cantyre, in Scotland. His mother's maiden name was Morrison. He had one brother (Robert). His father died when he was a small child. After the death of his father, his mother and her children with her parents emigrated to America. His mother had a brother who was supposed to be living in America and the family received letters purporting to be from him inviting them to come to America to live, stating that he would meet them when they landed or provide for them. They were deceived by the letters, I think they afterward believed they were forged by an agent of the ship which brought them over, in order to secure their passage, as his mother's brother did not meet them nor did they ever hear from him again. The brother of our great-grandfather died on the voyage and was buried at sea. The first incident remembered of the history of the family in America is of an old man and his wife, the young widow and her boy who had wandered to the country - strangers in a strange land, poor and friendless sitting down by the roadside crying. A citizen passed and inquired what their trouble was. He comforted them and took them to his home and gave them a home and employment. The gentleman's wife was an invalid and the widow became his house-keeper, and after the death of his first wife the widow became his second wife. The boy was bound out for a term of years, according to the custom of the time. I think he must have lived with a farmer as I never heard he learned a trade. (My father, J.C.L. Campbell, said he learned the cooper's trade. E.C.C.) Great grandfather married a woman of Welsh descent, named Jane Evans. She was five years younger than her husband. Their home until Gt. grandfather went to N. Carolina was Delaware. This is how we account for his coming to N. Ca.: His mother had one daughter by her second marriage; when the girl grew up she married and came to N. Ca. to live. Always ardent in his affections he was devoted to his sister and it was difficult then you know for people living in the different colonies to communicate with each other as the postal system had not been developed then. He decided to come to N. Ca. to find his sister. I do not know what his sister's name was, but I think he never succeeded in finding her.

"He settled in Stokes County, North Carolina. near Germantown <sic>. There were two families who came with him from Delaware to N. Ca. The Love family and the Vannoy family. One of the Loves married his daughter Flora; your father was named for this Mr. Love. Gr.- grandfather could not have been living in N. Ca. before the revolutionary war began as he did not come to N. Ca. until after the marriage of his sister, and he must have been ten or twelve years older than his sister. I have wanted to know myself if he was a soldier in the war of the revolution or not, but my mother was a small child at the time of his death, and although she remembers him and her gr.-grandmother, his wife, she can not tell anything of his history in connection with the war of the revolution.

"Our aunt, Mrs. Feimster is ten years older than my mother and was a young lady at the time of his death. She could remember if he told her of his early history. I think my aunt, Mrs. Feimster, is one of the best balanced people that I have ever known, and well preserved in body and mind, but she is thoroughly practical and not sentimental so she can not give us any information in regard to his war record. She is the oldest living representative of the Campbell family so far as I know. I was young when I left N. Ca. and had not had an opportunity to talk with the older members of the Campbell family who could have told me the facts which we desire. Aunt Flora Campbell Love descendants moved to Indiana. Possibly you have met some of them.

"Nothing of the nature of history interests me like family history. I am glad to believe our ancestors for as many generations as I can learn have been people of high honor, and there is a tradition that the ancestor of which I have been writing was of noble blood. Anyway, he was a man who had noble traits of character.

"Archibald Campbell, born on the Isle of Kintyre, Scotland, March 17, 1748. Died near Statesville, N. Ca. at the home of his son Milton, June 2, 1839, a few hours after his wife was found dead in her bed, when they went to wake her in the morning. His wife Jane Evans, a pure Welsh woman, married about the year 1780.

Research Notes

The biographical information compiled by James Jurney does in my opinion contain some flaws. The Campbell family was devout Christians founders and prominent members of the Snow Creek Methodist Church near Statesville, North Carolina. Although the absolute proof hasn't been discovered yet, it not likely that the family tradition was merely "embellishment". The tradition at one point mentions relation to the Duke of Argyll. At the time of Archibald Campbell (born in 1722) it is evident that the 3rd Duke of Argyll had a mistress. Her name was Elizabeth Anne Williams (nee "Shireburn") With research I have discovered that the name Shireburn was actually "Sherburne" Which was a prominent Roman Catholic family in the Lancaster, England area. In fact, the founder of Stony Hurst College had a daughter that married the Duke of Norfolk. The Duke of Argyll was in fact a peer of the Duke of Norfolk at the time. Elizabeth Anne Williams had two children that inherited English properties. The Scottish titles went to his cousin's children as they were Protestant and by law of succession and inheritance. Now it appears probable that Archibald Campbell born in 1722 was an illegitimate child and was sent to America at his coming of age to assist with the task of clay excavation for the making of porcelain. The 3rd Duke was a patron of such factories in Edinburgh, Scotland and also in Chelsea, England. (Not far from the estate that the Duke gave to his mistress and her children. ) It appears that Archibald Campbell was the younger brother of William Williams (alias Campbell) and may have been indentured to America. - John Whitinger (2015)


Source

  1. Alternate birth year is 1747
  2. #FG, #Letter, #WillSarah
  3. #Letter, church, and tombstone records
  4. #Letter
  • Ancestry and Kin of Eleanor Houston Campbell, Compilation by James Jurney; Pgs 85 to 86. With References to his sources as follows:
    • 5: Will of Sarah Hall, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Will Book D. Vol. 1 pg. 303
    • 7: Will of James Roddy, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Will Book A, Page 17; 22
    • Buried at Snow Creek Methodist Church Cemetery outside of Statesville, North Carolina;
    • 60: Campbell Family Bible Record
    • 61: Family Records of Sara C. Allen
    • 98: Family Records of Francis F. Fox
    • 116: Snow Creek Methodist Church Cemetery Records
  • Find A Grave: Memorial #13887433 Retrieved Oct 26, 2017. , Archibald Campell, Snow Creek Methodist Church Cemetery, Harmony, Iredell, North Carolina; tombstone photos
  • letter, given the compiler by Mrs. R.H. Saxton, a relative, was written to John Milton Campbell by Aunt Margaret Campbell Floyd's son, John A. Floyd, on June 18, 1905. At that time he was living in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter was copied by Mrs. Ethel Campbell Clements, sister to J.M. Campbell, and mailed to Jessie Campbell Davis, daughter of Harlan A. Campbell, another brother of Mrs. Clements
  • "North Carolina Estate Files, 1663-1979," database with images, FamilySearch (Link: 21 November 2016), Archibald Campbell, 1839; citing Iredell, North Carolina, United States, State Archives, Raleigh; FHL microfilm .
  • "United States Census, 1830," database with images, FamilySearch (Link: 29 July 2017), Archibald Campbell, Iredell, North Carolina, United States; citing 41, NARA microfilm publication M19, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 122; FHL microfilm 18,088.
  • "United States Census, 1820," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHGH-FFN : accessed 26 October 2017), Archabald Cambell, Stokes, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 336, NARA microfilm publication M33, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 84; FHL microfilm 162,800.
  • "United States Census, 1810," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XH2V-Q4W : accessed 26 October 2017), Archabald Campbell, Deep River, Stokes, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 581, NARA microfilm publication M252 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 43; FHL microfilm 337,916.
  • "United States Census, 1800," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHRD-WQJ : accessed 26 October 2017), Archabald Campbell, Salisbury, Stokes, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 547, NARA microfilm publication M32, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 32; FHL microfilm 337,908.
  • "United States Census, 1800," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHRD-QLY : accessed 26 October 2017), Archbald Campbell, Salisbury, Stokes, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 567, NARA microfilm publication M32, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 32; FHL microfilm 337,908.
  • "United States Census, 1790," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHK1-8D6 : accessed 26 October 2017), Arche Campell, Stokes, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 549, NARA microfilm publication M637, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 7; FHL microfilm 568,147.
  • "North Carolina Estate Files, 1663-1979," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2Z7-38XT : 21 November 2016), Archibald Campbell, 1808; citing Stokes, North Carolina, United States, State Archives, Raleigh; FHL microfilm.
  • "Genealogical Society of Iredell County, Inc., NC Revolutionary Soldiers’ Graves – Iredell, Davie & Alexander Co., Iredell County Tracks, Fall 2006." See Part 1 and Part 2
  • See also Space:Iredell County Revolutionary Soldiers for a comprehensive list of Iredell Revolutionary War Veterans.

Acknowledgements

  • WikiTree profile Campbell-2106 created through the import of CombinedTreeFmMyHeritage-Private.GED on May 29, 2011 by George Stradtman. See the Changes page for the details of edits by George and others.
  • Source S-899753593Repository: #R-899753595 Title: Ancestry Family Trees, Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.




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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Archibald by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Archibald:

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Archibald is 18 degrees from Peter Roberts, 15 degrees from Emma Smith and 17 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.