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Philippe Capet (abt. 1052 - 1108)

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Philippe (Philippe I) Capet
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Profile last modified | Created 21 Mar 2011 | Last significant change: 29 Nov 2018
13:23: Isabelle Rassinot edited the Biography for Philippe Capet (abt.1052-1108). (Removed duplicate blurb from Richardson (left one), eliminated stuff from Darryl Lundy's site - inaccurate) [Thank Isabelle for this | 1 thank-you received]
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Biography

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Philip I (23 May 1052 – 29 July 1108), called the Amorous (French: l' Amoureux),[1] was King of France from 1060 to his death. His reign, like that of most of the early Direct Capetians, was extraordinarily long for the time. The monarchy began a modest recovery from the low it reached in the reign of his father and he added to the royal demesne the Vexin and Bourges.

From the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy page on France Capetian Kings:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CAPET.htm#PhilippeIdied1108B

PHILIPPE de France, son of HENRI I King of France & his third wife Anna Iaroslavna of Kiev (1052-Château de Melun, Seine-et-Marne 30 Jul 1108, bur Abbaye de Saint Benoît-sur-Loire[252]).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum names (in order) "Philippum, Hugonem atque Rotbertum" as the three sons of King Henri and Anna[253]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the birth in 1052 of "rex futurus regis Francorum Henrici filius ex Anna filia Georgii regis Sclavonum"[254].

He was consecrated associate-king 23 May 1059, at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims. His father entrusted his education to his uncle Baldwin V Count of Flanders, who became regent until 1066/67.

He succeeded his father in 1060 as PHILIPPE I King of France. Consecrated 25 Dec 1071 at Laon, again 16 May 1098 at Tours, and for a fourth time 25 Dec 1100 at Reims.

Foulques IV "le Rechin" Comte d'Anjou ceded Château-Landon and Gâtinais to him in 1069, in return for the king's recognition of his accession as count[255]. King Philippe pursued this policy of expanding his territories, adding Corbie in 1074, acquiring part of Vermandois on the death of Raoul Comte de Vermandois in 1074, invading Vexin in 1077, and taking possession of Bourges in 1100[256].

In 1071, after ineffectively helping Arnoul III Count of Flanders against his uncle Robert, the latter made peace with King Philippe and arranged the king's marriage to his stepdaughter.

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii records the death "apud Milidunum IV Kal Aug" of King Philippe and his burial "in ecclesia sancti Benedicti super Ligerim in pago Aurelianensi"[257]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex Francorum"[258]. The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "III Kal Aug" of "Philippus rex"[259].

Betrothed ([1055/59]) to JUDITH [Maria/Sophia] of Germany, daughter of Emperor HEINRICH III King of Germany & his second wife Agnès de Poitou ([1054]-14 Mar [1092/96], bur Admont Abbey).

The Gesta Hungarorum records that King András forced the marriage of "Salomoni regi" and "Henricus imperator…Sophiam suam filiam", specifying that she had earlier been betrothed to "filio regis Franciæ"[260]. This could only refer to the future Philippe I King of France as it is unlikely that the emperor's daughter would have been betrothed to his younger brother. This betrothal is not corroborated in the western European primary sources so far consulted.

m firstly (1072, repudiated 1092) BERTHA of Holland, daughter of FLORIS I Count of Holland & his wife Gertrud of Saxony[-Billung] ([1058]-Montreuil-sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais 30 Jul 1093).

The Liber Modernorum Regum Francorum records the marriage of "filiam ducis Frisiæ" and "rex Philippus"[261]. The Historia Francorum names "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam" as wife of King Philippe[262]. The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum et Florencium…et Machtildim" as children of Count Floris & his wife, specifying that "Machtildim" married "Philippus rex Francie" after the death of her father which indicates that "Machtildim" in this text is an error for Bertha[263].

Her marriage was arranged as part of the settlement under which her future husband recognised her stepfather as Count of Flanders[264].

She was repudiated after King Philippe abducted Bertrade de Montfort from her husband, and was sent to Montreuil[265].

m secondly (Paris 1092, before 27 Oct) as her second husband, BERTRADE de Montfort, fifth wife of FOULQUES IV “le Réchin” Comte d’Anjou, daughter of SIMON [I] de Montfort-l'Amaury & his third wife Agnès d’Evreux (-Fontevrault end-1115/1116, bur church of the priory of Hautes-Bruyères, Saint-Rémy-l’Honoré, Yvelines).

The De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses names "Fulconi Richin Andegavensi comiti uxorem suam nomine Bertradam" as second wife of King Philippe, specifying that the king abducted her from her first husband after repudiating his first wife[266]. William of Tyre records this marriage[267].

Pope Urban II at the Council of Autun excommunicated the king 16 Oct 1094, confirmed at the Council of Clermont 18/28 Nov 1095[268]. The church finally admitted the validity of the marriage after the Council of Paris 2 Dec 1104[269].

Orderic Vitalis alleges that Bertrade tried to poison her stepson Louis so her own sons could succeed to the throne[270]. "Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][271].

King Philippe I & his first wife had four children:

1. CONSTANCE de France ([1078]-14 Sep 1126[272]). Orderic Vitalis names "Ludovicum-Tedbaldum et Constantiam" as the children of Philippe I King of France and his wife "Bertrandam, Florentii Frisiorum ducis filiam"[273]. The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis", specifying that Constance married firstly "Hugoni Trecharum comiti", from whom she was separated for consanguinity, and secondly "Boamundo apud Carnotho"[274]. Orderic Vitalis confirms her parentage and her two marriages[275], recording 1106 as the year of her second marriage in an earlier passage[276].

An early sign of possible difficulties in Constance's first marriage is shown by the charter dated 1102 under which "Constantia, Philippi regis Francorum filia…Hugonis comitis Trecensium coniux legitima" donated property to the abbey of Molesme[277], the suggestion being that the reference to "coniux legitima" indicates that her husband may have had another "unofficial" relationship at this time. "Hugo comes Campanie Teotbaldi comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Molesme by charter dated 2 Apr 1104, which names "frater meus Odo comes, Constantiam regis Francorum filiam necnon et comitissam Adelaidem uxorem fratris mei comitis Stephani nepotes…" and is subscribed by "Teotbaldus puer filius Stephani comitis nepos huius comitis Hugonis"[278].

William of Tyre names her, and her father, when he records her (second) marriage[279]. Suger's Vita Ludovici records the marriage of "Antiochenum principem Boamundum" and "domini Ludovici…sororem Constantiam" at Chartres, mentioning her previous marriage to "comitem Trecensem Hugonem"[280]. The Lignages d'Outremer name "Costance la fille le roy de Franche" as wife of "Beymont" son of "Robert Guichart qui conquest Puille"[281].

Her second marriage was arranged by Adela Ctss de Blois while Prince Bohémond was in France canvassing support against Byzantium. After her second marriage, she remained with her husband in Apulia and never visited Palestine[282].

She was regent for her son in Italy after the death of her second husband[283]. She claimed the title "Queen" as daughter of the king of France.

The Romoaldi Annales record that "regina Constancia" was captured by "comite Alexandro et Grimoaldo Barense in Umenatia civitate" and taken to Bari in Aug, dated to 1119[284]. The Annales Ceccanenses record that "reginam Boamundi" was freed from Bari in 1120, after the intercession of Pope Calixtus II[285].

m firstly ([1093/95], annulled Soissons 25 Dec 1104 on grounds of consanguinity[286]) as his first wife, HUGUES I de Blois Comte de Troyes, son of THIBAUT III Comte de Blois & his third wife Alix de Crépy-Valois (-Palestine 14 Jun 1126).

m secondly (Chartres [25 Mar/26 May] 1106) BOHEMOND I Prince of Antioch, son of ROBERT “Guiscard” Duke of Apulia and Calabria [Sicily] & his first wife Alberada di Buonalberga (1052-Canosa di Puglia, Apulia 6/7 Mar 1111, bur Cathedral of Canosa di Puglia).

2. LOUIS THIBAUT de France (Paris end 1081-Château Bethizy near Paris 1 Aug 1137, bur église de l'Abbaye royale de Saint-Denis).

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Ludovicum regem et filiam unam Constanciam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] uxorem sororem Roberti Flandrensis comitis"[287].

He succeeded his father in 1108 as LOUIS VI "le Gros" King of France.

3. HENRI de France (1083-young).

The Historia Francorum names (in order) "Ludowicum et filiam Constantiam [atque Henricum]" as the children of King Philippe and "filiam Florentii ducis Frisonum Bertam"[288].

King Philippe I & his second wife had four children:

4. PHILIPPE de France ([1093]-[2 Sep] after 1133).

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem"[289]. His parentage is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis[290].

He succeeded as Seigneur de Montlhéry in 1104 by right of his wife.

His half-brother installed him as Comte de Mantes and Seigneur de Mehun-sur-Yèvre in [1104].

Suger's Vita Ludovici records the rebellion of "regis Ludovici Philippus frater" against his brother, supported by "Amalricus de Monte Forti…avunculus eius" and "Fulco comes Andegavensis postea rex Hierosolymitanus frater eius", and the confiscation of his castles of Montlhéry and Mantes[291].

"Fulco iunior Andegavensium comes Fulconis comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud with the consent of "Bertrade regina matre meo, Philipo fratre meo" by charter dated to [1109/1112/13][292].

The necrology of Saint-Germain L'Auxerrois records the death "IV Non Sep" of "Philippus frater Ludovici regis"[293], which may refer to Philippe Comte de Mantes.

5. FLEURI [Florus] de France ([1095]-after 1119).

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem"[296]. His parentage is also recorded by Orderic Vitalis[297].

Living in Anjou with his mother in 1117.

Seigneur de Nangis, by right of his wife.

Fleuri & his wife had one child.

6. CECILE de France ([1097]-after 1145).

The Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii names "Philippum et Florum et filiam unam" as children of "Philippus rex [et] Fulconi Rechin Andagavorum comiti uxorem", specifying that the (unnamed) daughter married "Tanchredus Anthiochenus"[299]. Her parentage is recorded by William of Tyre, who also records her two marriages[300].

Her first marriage was arranged while Bohémond I Prince of Antioch was visiting the French court seeking support against Alexios I Emperor of Byzantium. She sailed for Antioch end 1106[301].

While dying, Prince Tancred made Pons de Toulouse promise to marry his wife[302]. Albert of Aix records the marriage at Tripoli of "Punctus filius Bertrannus de Tripla" and "uxorem Tancredi, quæ filia erat regis Franciæ", dated to [1115] from the context[303]. William of Tyre refers to the wife of the count of Tripoli as uterine sister of Foulques King of Jerusalem and names her[304]. She claimed Jebail as her dower, but was eventually satisfied with Chastel Rouge and Arzghan[305].

She became Lady of Tarsus and Mamistra, in Cilician Armenia, in 1126[306]. "Cecilia comitissa" donated property for the souls of "domini mei Poncii comitis…et filii mei Raimundi comitis" to the church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem by charter dated 1139[307].

m firstly (late 1106) TANCRED Prince of Tiberias, Regent of Antioch, son of ODO [Guillaume] “le Bon” Marquis & his wife Emma de Hauteville (-12 Dec 1112). He succeeded in 1111 as Prince of Antioch.

m secondly (Tripoli 1112) PONS Count of Tripoli, son of BERTRAND Comte de Toulouse and Tripoli & his second wife Hélie de Bourgogne [Capet] ([1096]-executed near Pilgrim Castle, near Tripoli Mar 1137).

7. EUSTACHIE de France (-1143).

She and her husband are named by Kerrebrouck who cites no primary source on which this is based[308].

Founded the Abbaye de Yerres.

King Philippe had one [probably illegitimate] child [by an unknown mistress]:

8. EUDES de France (-1096).

The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death in 1096 of "Odo frater Ludovici Grossi de alia matre"[309]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[310], Eudes was the son of King Philippe & his first wife but the primary source on which this is based has not been identified.

According to Kerrebrouck[311], Eudes was the son of King Philippe's second marriage but there seems little time for a third child to have been born to Bertrade de Montfort during the first three years of her marriage. It is therefore more likely that he was an illegitimate son of King Philippe.

References:

[252] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, p. 155.

[253] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 10, MGH SS IX, p. 389.

[254] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1052, MGH SS XXIII, p. 789.

[255] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 70.

[256] Kerrebrouck (2000), pp. 70-1.

[257] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[258] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, p. 268.

[259] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.1, Abbaye de Saint-Denis, p. 322.

[260] Kézai, S., Veszprémy, L. and Schaer, F. (eds. and trans.) (1999) Simonis de Kéza Gesta Hungarorum (CEP), 57, p. 127.

[261] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 390.

[262] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.

[263] Bruch, H. (ed.) (1973) Chronologia Johannes de Beke (The Hague), 45, p. 85, available at < http://www.inghist.nl/Onderzoek/Projecten /KroniekVanJohannesDeBekeTot1430/latijn> (31 Aug 2006).

[264] Nicholas (1992), p. 52.

[265] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 71.

[266] De Genere Comitum Flandrensium, Notæ Parisienses MGH SS, p. 257.

[267] WT XIV.I, p. 606.

[268] Runciman, S. (1978) A History of the Crusades (Penguin Books), Vol. 1, p. 107.

[269] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 72.

[270] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. VI, Book XI, pp. 51-5.

[271] Bienvenue, J. M. (ed.) (2000) Grand Cartulaire de Fontevraud, Tome I (Poitiers) (“Fontevraud”) 156, p. 142.

[272] Falkenhausen, Vera von 'Constantia oppure Constantinopolis? Sui presenti viaggi in Oriente della vedova di Boemondo I' in S????S??S Studi … Anastasi, 153-67 (1994), cited in Houben, H. (trans. Loud, G. H. & Milburn, D.) (2002) Roger II of Sicily, A Ruler between East and West (Cambridge University Press), p. 39 footnote 16.

[273] Le Prévost, A. (1845) Orderici Vitalis Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ (Paris) ("Orderic Vitalis (Prévost)"), Vol. III, Liber VII, I, p. 159.

[274] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[275] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 265.

[276] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. III, Book V, p. 183.

[277] Laurent, J. (ed.) (1911) Cartulaires de l'abbaye de Molesme, Tome II, 254, p. 237.

[278] Molesme II, 19, p. 26.

[279] WT XI.I, p. 450.

[280] Lecoy de la Marche, A. (ed.) (1867) Œuvres complètes de Suger (Paris) ("Suger"), Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis IX, p. 30.

[281] Nielen, M.-A. (ed.) (2003) Lignages d'Outremer (Paris), Le Vaticanus Latinus 4789, CCC.XXXIIII, p. 93.

[282] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 48-9.

[283] Houben (2002), p. 31.

[284] Romoaldi Annales, MGH SS XIX, p. 417.

[285] Annales Ceccanenses 1120, MGH SS XIX, p. 282.

[286] Ivo of Chartes, Epistolæ, in Migne, J. P. (ed.) Patrologiæ cursus completes, serie Latina CLXII, pp. 163-4 ep. 158, cited in Chibnall, Vol. VI, p. 70 footnote 5.

[287] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[288] Hugonis Floriacensis, Liber qui Modernorum Regum Francorum continet Actus 11, MGH SS IX, p. 391, additional manuscript quoted in footnote *.

[289] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[290] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 263.

[291] Suger Vita Ludovici Grossi Regis XVII, pp. 66-7.

[292] Fontevraud 156, p. 142.

[293] Obituaires de Sens Tome I.2, Chapitre Saint-Germain L'Auxerrois, p. 799.

[294] Ex Chronica Regum Francorum, RHGF XII, p. 208.

[295] Le cartulaire du prieuré de Notre-Dame de Longpont de l´ordre de Cluny au diocèse de Paris (Lyon, 1870) ("Longpont Notre-Dame"), CXCVII, p. 181.

[296] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[297] Orderic Vitalis, Vol. IV, Book VIII, p. 263.

[299] Historia Regum Francorum Monasterii Sancti Dionysii 31, MGH SS IX, p. 405.

[300] WT XI.I, p. 450, and XIV.I, p. 606.

[301] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 52.

[302] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 125.

[303] Albert of Aix (RHC), Liber XII, Cap. XIX, p. 701.

[304] WT XIV.V, pp. 612 and XIV.VI, p. 614.

[305] Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, p. 134 footnote 3.

[306] Sturdza, M. D. (1999) Dictionnaire Historique et Généalogique des Grandes Familles de Grèce, d'Albanie et de Constantinople (2e edition Paris), p. 631.

[307] Rozière, E. de (ed.) (1849) Cartulaire de l'église de Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem (Paris) ("Saint-Sépulchre de Jerusalem"), 92, p. 183.

[308] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 74.

[309] Chronica Albrici Monachi Trium Fontium 1096, MGH SS XXIII, p. 805.

[310] ES II 11.

[311] Kerrebrouck (2000), p. 74.


2. ^ History Today, Philip I Crowned King of France

http://www.historytoday.com/archive

3. ^ Europäische Stammtafeln XIV 146 les seigneurs de Nangis

Philip I of France

House of Capet

Born: 23 May 1052

Died: 29 July 1108 (age 56) Melun, France

Burial: Saint-Benoît-sur-Loire

King of France

Coronation: 23 May 1059

Co-reign: 23 May 1059 - 4 August 1060

Solo Reign: 4 August 1060 – 29 July 1108

Preceded by Henry I

Succeeded by Louis VI

Spouses:

Bertha of Holland

Bertrade de Montfort

Issue:

Constance, Princess of Antioch

Louis VI of France

Cecile, Princess of Galilee

Father Henry I of France

Mother Anne of Kiev

http://books.google.fr/books?id=pz4QAAAAYAAJ&q=Bourges+Eudes+Arpin+60000&dq=Bourges+Eudes+Arpin+60000&pgis=1

6. ? Tout cet épisode a récemment été mis en lumière par Bernard Gineste, « Eustache de Saint-Père: Appel en justice devant le roi à Étampes (8 février 1079) », in Corpus Étampois,(2007).

http://www.corpusetampois.com/cls-11-eustachedesaintpere1079notice.html

7. ? Le récit de cet épisode par Raoul Tortaire, vers 1114, a été édité et traduit par Bernard Gineste dans le Corpus Etampois (2008)

http://www.corpusetampois.com/cls-12-raoultortaire1114debacledupuiset1079.html

8.? Michel Parisse et Xavier Barral I Altet (médiéviste de renommée internationale), Le roi de France et son royaume, autour de l'an Mil, 1987, p. 36

9. ? Bernard Gineste, citant Dom Basile Fleureau : Son mariage prétendu avec Jean d'Etampes repose sur une confusion avec Eustachie, fille de Ferry de Châtillon, fondatrice de l'abbaye d'Yerre Corpus Etampois

http://www.corpusetampois.com/che-16-legendedejeandetampes.html#fleureau

1. [S218] Marlyn Lewis, Ancestry of Elizabeth of York.

2. [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 101-22.

3. [S338] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 8th ed., 101-23.

4. [S338] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 8th ed., 101-22.

5. [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 101-23.

6. [S347] Carl Boyer 3rd, Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans, p. 159.

Count of Paris

BIOGRAPHY: General Notes:

King of FRANCE Reigned 1059/1060-1108.

BOOKS

Kings and Queens of Europe, Genealogical Chart, Anne Taute and Romilly Squire, Taute, 1989: "Philippe I, Son of Henri I and Anna Kiev, King of France 1060- 1108, Mar =1 Bertha Holland, Died 1108."

  • The Political History of England, Vol II, George Burton Adams Longmans Green and Co, 1905, Ch I, p150:


The Story of Civilization, Will Durant, Vol IV, The Age of Faith, Bk V, The Climax of Chrisianity, Ch XXV, The Recovery of Europe, Sec XI France,

p 688: " Philip I (1060-1108) made a secure niche for himself in history by divorcing his wife at forty and persuading Count Fulk of Anjou to cede to him the Countess Bertrade. A priest was found to solemnize the adultery as marriage, but Pope Urban II, coming to France to preach the First Crusade, excommunicated the King. Philip persisted in sin for twelve years; at last he sent Bertrade away and was shriven; but a while later he repented his repentance, and resumed his Queen. She traveled with him to Anjou, taught her two husbands amity, and seems to have served both of them to the best of her charms. Having grown fat at forty-five, Philip handed over the major affairs of state to his son Louis VI (1108-1137), himself known as Louis the Fat."

p589: "...the feudal leaders who had taken the cross [of the First Crusade] had assembled each his own force in his own place. No king was among them; indeed Philip I of France, William II of England, and Henry IV of Germany were all under sentence of excommunication when Urban preached the crusade..."

p668: "[William the Conqueror] warred with Philip I of France over boundaries;when he tarried at Rouen, almost immovable with corpulence Philip jested (it was said) that the King of England was lying in,' and there would be a grand display of candles at his churching. William swore that he would indeed light many candles. He ordered his army to burn down Mantes and all its neighborhood, and to destroy all crops and fruits; and it was done."

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1981, Micropaedia,Vol VII,

p940, Philip I: "Born 1052, Died 29/30 Jul 1108 Melun France, King of France who came to the throne at a time when the Capetian monarchy was extremely weak but who succeeded in enlarging the royal treasury by a policy of devious alliances, the sale of his neutrality in quarrels of powerful vassals, and the practice of simony on an enormous scale."

The Wall Chart of World History, Edward Hull, 1988, Studio Editions, France 1060:

"Philip I, Son of Henry I, King of France 1060-1108, First Crusade 1099 by Peter the Hermit...Eight Crusades or Holy Wars. A cross of red cloth on their right shoulder, hence Crusade'...1st 1096-1099, preached by Peter the Hermit 1096. 300,000 men blessed by Urban II. Godfrey commands. Jerusalem taken 1099. Godfrey king..."

BIOGRAPHY: b. 1052

d. July 29/30, 1108, Melun, Fr.

king of France (1059/60-1108) who came to the throne at a time when the Capetian monarchy was extremely weak but who succeeded in enlarging the royal treasury by a policy of devious alliances, the sale of his neutrality in the quarrels of powerful vassals, and the practice of simony on a huge scale.

Philip was the elder son of Henry I of France by his second wife, Anne of Kiev. Crowned at Reims in May 1059, he became sole king on his father's death in 1060. Two years after he came of age in 1066, he obtained the county of Gâtinais as the price of his neutrality in a family struggle over Anjou and thereby linked the royal possessions in Sens with those around Paris, Melun, and Orléans. His major efforts, however, were directed toward Normandy, in which from 1076 he supported Robert II Curthose, its ineffectual duke, first against Robert's father, King William I of England, then against Robert's brother, William II. Philip's true goal was to prevent emergence of a rival power in Normandy, for he was willing to abandon Robert whenever it seemed possible he might become dangerous.

Because of his firm determination to retain control over all appointments to ecclesiastical posts, which he blatantly sold, Philip was eventually drawn into conflict with the papacy. This conflict was exacerbated by his matrimonial affairs; his scandalous "marriage" with Bertrada de Montfort, wife of a vassal, brought him repeated excommunication. By 1104, when the struggle with the papacy was finally ended, Louis VI, Philip's son by his legitimate wife, Bertha, had taken over the administration of the kingdom, Philip having been rendered inactive by his extreme obesity.

Copyright © 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.

Philip I (of France) (1052-1108), king of France (1060-1108), the eldest son of Henry I, king of France. The first six years of his reign were spent under the regency of his mother and his uncle. Philip's reign was troubled by many clashes with his powerful vassals, particularly in Normandy (Normandie), but he succeeded in enlarging his dominions. Philip was excommunicated in 1095 because he had repudiated his wife, Bertha of Holland, and married Bertrada, the wife of the count of Anjou.

Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2002. © 1993-2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

First name aka 'Philippe'. Described as 'obese'. Philip was excommunicated in 1095 because he had repudiated his wife, Bertha of Holland, & married Bertrada (the wife of the Count of Anjou). Buried where he was, instead of the tradional place of his ancestors, because he didn't feel worthy. His tomb was discovered in 1830.

Source:

  • Royal Ancestry by Douglas Richardson Vol. III, page 19

PHILIPPE I OF FRANCE, King of France, 1060-1108, Count of Paris and Gatinais, Chatelain of Bourges, son and heir, born in 1053, before 23 May. He married (1st) in 1072 BERTHA OF HOLLAND, daughter of Florenz (or Florent) I, Count of Holland and Westfriesland, by Gertrude, daughter of Berthold II, Duke of Saxony. She was born about 1058. They had two sons, Louis (VI) [KIng of France] and Henri, and one daughter, Constance. He repudiated his wife, Bertha, in 1092; she died at Montreuil-sur-Mer (Pas-de-Calais) 30 July 1093. He married (2nd) 15 May 1092 BERTRADE DE MONTFORT, divorced wife of Foulques IV le Rechin, Count of Anjou and Touraine, and daughter of Simon I de Montfort, Count of Montfort-l'Amaury, by Agnes, daughter of Richard, Count of Evreux. She was born about 1060. They had two sons, Philippe [Count of Mantes, seigneur of Mehun sur Yevres] and Fleury (or Floire) seigneur of Nangis], and one daughter, Cecile (wife of Tancred, Prince of Tiberiade, afterwards Prince of Antioch, and Pons of Toulouse, Count of Tripoli). PHILIPPE I, King of France, died in Chateau Melun (Seine-et-Marne) 29 (or 30) July 1108, and was buried in the church of the Abbey of Saint-Benoit-sur-Loire. His widow, Bertrade. died as a nun at Fontevrault (Maine-et--Loire) 14 Feb. 1117, and was buried in the church of the Priory of Hautes-Bruyeres (Saint-Remy-I'Honore, Yvelines). ==

Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia

The book, 'The Oxford History of Medieval Europe'

The book, 'Kings & Queens of Europe'

Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia

From the Penny Cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, Page 427:

http://books.google.cl/books?id=o8ZPAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA427&lpg=RA1-PA427&dq=%22Henri+I%22+of+France+death&source=bl&ots=EHyDvRf2ZG&sig=w6otVx2dohYo36Fsnuz5NQxNDjI&hl=es&ei=rjncTPWXE8Gs8Ab8qrz8CQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFkQ6AEwCDgK#v=onepage&q=%22Henri%20I%22%20of%20France%20death&f=false

1060.) Philippe I, son of Henri I, born AD 1053.

References

  • Royal Ancestry by Douglas Richardson, Vol. III, page 19


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No known carriers of Philippe I's Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA have taken yDNA or mtDNA tests.

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Images: 2
Philip I De France Image 1
Philip I De France Image 1

Philip I Capet, King of France
Philip I Capet, King of France

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On 30 Nov 2014 at 22:10 GMT Doug Lockwood wrote:

Notables
Philippe I Capet is notable.
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Philippe I is 31 degrees from Sharon Caldwell, 27 degrees from Burl Ives and 21 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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