Philippe IV (Capet) France

Philippe (Capet) France (1268 - 1314)

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Philippe (Philippe IV) "le Bel, the Fair, Roi de France" France formerly Capet
Born in Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, Francemap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Notre Dame De Paris,Paris,Seine,Francemap
Descendants descendants
Died in Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, Francemap
Profile last modified | Created 4 Jun 2012
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Contents

Biography

Title: King of Navarre (Philip I): FROM 1284 TO 1305
Title: King of France (Philip IV): FROM 1285 TO 1314
Birth:1268 in Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne, Ile-de-France, France
Birth: ABT APR 1268, Fontainebleu, Melun, Seine-et-Marne, iÎle-de-France, France
Death: 29 OCT 1314, Fontainebleau, France
Death: 29 NOV 1314, Fontainebleu, Melun, Seine-et-Marne, iÎle-de-France, France
Burial: 09 Dec1314, St Denis, Isle De France, or St Denis, Seine-St-Denis, France, or Saint-Denis, Seine-et-Marne, iÎle-de-France, France
Marriage: 16 AUG 1284, Notre Dame de Paris, Paris, Seine, France. The children of Philip IV and Jeanne of Navarre were:
  1. Marguerite (1288–c.1294)
  2. Louis X - ( 4 October 1289–5 June 1316)
  3. Blanche (died c.1294)
  4. Philip V - (1292/93–3 January 1322)
  5. Charles IV - (1294–1 February 1328)
  6. Isabelle - (c. 1295–23 August 1358)
  7. Robert (born 1297, died 1308 at St-Germaine-en-Laye)

Other Bios


b. 1268, Fontainebleau, Fr.; d. Nov. 29, 1314, Fontainebleau.

PHILIP THE FAIR, French PHILIPPE LE BEL, king of France from 1285 to 1314 (and of Navarre, as Philip I, from 1284 to 1305, ruling jointly with his wife, Joan I of Navarre). His long struggle with the Roman papacy ended with the transfer of the Curia to Avignon, Fr. (beginning the so-called Babylonian Captivity, 1309-78). He also secured French royal power by wars on barons and neighbours and by restriction of feudal usages. His three sons were successively kings of France: Louis X, Philip V, and Charles IV.

Early years. Born at Fontainebleau while his grandfather was still ruling, Philip, the second son of Philip III the Bold and grandson of St. Louis (Louis IX), was not yet three when his mother, Isabella of Aragon, died on her return from the crusade on which Louis IX had perished. The motherless Philip and his three brothers saw little of their father, who, stricken by Isabella's death, threw himself into campaigning and administrative affairs. His troubled childhood and the series of blows he suffered explain in some measure the conflicting elements in his adult personality. In 1274 his father married Marie de Brabant, a beautiful and cultivated woman, and, with her arrival at court, intrigue began to flourish. In the same year, the two-year-old Joan, heiress of Champagne and Navarre, was welcomed as a refugee. Reared with the royal children, she would, when she was 12, become the bride of Philip the Fair.

In 1276 Philip's older brother, Louis, died, and the shock of this event, which suddenly made Philip heir of the kingdom, was compounded by persistent rumours of poisoning and suspicions that Philip's stepmother intended to see Isabella's remaining sons destroyed. Vague allegations were circulated that Louis's death was linked with certain unspecified "unnatural acts" of his father. These rumours, never satisfactorily put to rest, together with the unexpected change in Philip's fortunes, apparently served to arouse in him feelings of insecurity and mistrust.

Consequently, Philip turned elsewhere in search of a model for his own conduct. He found it in Louis IX, whose memory was increasingly venerated as the number of miracles attributed to him mounted. Reports of Louis's exacting standards of rulership and his saintly virtues were reinforced by the precepts of the religious advisers who surrounded the adolescent Philip. A more self-confident person might have been able to discriminate realistically among the sometimes artificially exaggerated stories and the utopian ideals. Philip, however, became convinced that it was his God-given duty to attain the lofty goals of his grandfather.

When Philip was 16, he was knighted and married to Joan of Navarre. In 1285 he accompanied his father to the south on a campaign to install Philip's brother Charles on the throne of Aragon. He had no sympathy with the enterprise, however, which was backed by his stepmother and aimed against the King of Aragon, his late mother's brother. When his father died in October 1285, Philip immediately abandoned the venture.

Conflict with the papacy. Philip's rupture with Boniface VIII can be considered a third consequence of the English war


King of France, Roi de France, KING OF FRANCE, 'THE FAIR', Philippe IV le Bel, Kung av Spanien, Kung i Frankrike 1285-1314, och Navarra 1274-1305 (som Felipe I), greve i Champagne och Brie, Fransk kung, (1285-1314)

Philip IV (April?June 1268 ? 29 November 1314), called the Fair (French: le Bel), son and successor of Philip III, reigned as King of France from 1285 until his death. He was the husband of Joan I of Navarre, by virtue of which hewas King of Navarre (as Philip I) and Count of Champagne from 1284 to 1305. The nickname Philip "the Fair" or "the Handsome" comes from his appearance; it had nothing to do with his actions as king.

A member of the House of Capet, Philip was born at the Palace of Fontainebleau at Seine-et-Marne, the son of King Philip III and Isabella of Aragon. Philip was nicknamed the Fair (le Bel) because of his handsome appearance, but his inflexible personality gained him other epithets, from friend and foe alike.

Father: Philippe III , King Of France b: 1 May 1245 in Poissy, Yvelines, France
Mother: Princess Of Aragon Isabelle b: 1243-1247 in Montpellier, Herault, France
Marriage 1 Joan I , Of Navarre, Queen Of France b: 14 Jan 1271/72 in Bar-Sur-Seine, Aube, France. Married: 16 Aug 1284 in Notre Dame De Paris, Seine, France
Children:
  1. Isabelle , Queen Of England b: 1292 in Paris, Seine, France
  2. Marguerite , Princess Of France b: 1286 in PARIS,SEINE,FRANCE
  3. Louis X "the Headstrong" , King Of France b: 4 Oct 1289 in Paris,Seine,France
  4. Blanche , Princess Of France b: 1290 in PARIS,SEINE,FRANCE
  5. Philippe V , King Of France b: 1291-1292 in Paris, Seine, France
  6. Charles IV "the Fari" , King Of France b: 1295 in Clermont, Oise, France
  7. Prince Of France Robert b: 1297 in PARIS,SEINE,FRANCE

King Philip IV "the Fair" of France - was born in 1268 in Fontainebleau, Seine-Et-Marne, France and died on 29 Nov 1314 in Fontainebleau, Seine-Et-Marne, France and was buried in Saint Denis, France . He was the son of King PhilipIII "the Bold" of France and Princess Isabel of Aragon.

King Philip married Jeanne of Navarre on 16 Aug 1284. Jeanne was born Jan 1271/1272 in France. She was the daughter of King Henri "le Gros" of Navarre and Queen Blanche Artois. She died on 2 Apr 1305 in France .


Philip, IV, The Fair of France, King of France (1285-1314), arrested Bishop Saisset in 1301 causing a quarrel with Pope BONIFACE, VIII, who denounced the king. Philip retaliated by convoking thefirst STATES-GENERAL in 1302-3 to hear a justification of his actions. Threatened with excommunication, Philip had Boniface seized and later gained control of the PAPACY with the election of CLEMENT V, who transferred the papacy to Avignon in 1309. Beginning in 1294, Philip tried to conquer Guienne from EDWARD I of England, but was forced to concede, in 1303, the duchy to Edward. His attempts to subdue the Flemish led to the disastrous French defeat in 1302 at Courtrai. His son, LOUIS X, succeeded him.

King Philip IV "the Fair" of France - was born in 1268 in Fontainebleau, Seine-Et-Marne, France and died on 29 Nov 1314 in Fontainebleau, Seine-Et-Marne, France and was buried in Saint Denis, France . He was the son of King PhilipIII "the Bold" of France and Princess Isabel of Aragon.

King Philip married Jeanne of Navarre on 16 Aug 1284. Jeanne was born Jan 1271/1272 in France. She was the daughter of King Henri "le Gros" of Navarre and Queen Blanche Artois. She died on 2 Apr 1305 in France .

King Philip - Philip "Le Bel" called Philip the Fair was born in the year 1268, 0ne hundred and fifty years after the formation of the Knights Templar and was King of France from 1285-1314. How could someone as corrupt as he, be called by the people, Philip the Fair? The term "The Fair" was a reference to Philip IV's good looks, being tall and handsome with long blonde hair and blue eyes. Philip Le Bel, in contrast to his pleasing looks, was a cold and secretive man who had strong wishes for France to be the head of the empire. In order to accomplish this plan he would need great financial resources (which the Templars possessed) and a week and subservient Papal Throne. Philip is well known for his battles with Boniface VIII (see chronology below) At one point Philip publicly burned Boniface VIII's Bull Unam Sanctam which gave the Pope absolute supremacy over everyone. Children:

  1. King Louis X of France was born on 4 Oct 1289 in Paris, France and died on 5 Jun 1316 in Vincennes, France and was buried in St. Denis, France . King Louis - married Marguerite of Burgandy and then Clemence of Hungary.
  2. King Philip V of France was born about 1294 in Lyons, France and died on 3 Jan 1322 in Longchamp, France and was buried in St. Denis, France . King Philip - married Joan of Burgandy.
  3. Queen Isabella of France was born in 1292, lived in Paris, France and died on 22 Aug 1358 in Hertford Castle, Hertford, England and was buried in Grey Friars, Church, London, England . Queen Isabella married King Edward II of England on 25 Jan 1307/1308 in Boulogne, Pas-de-Calais, France. King Edward was born on 25 Apr 1274 in Carnarvon Castle, Carnarvon , Wales. He was the son of King Edward I "Longshanks" Plantagenet and Princess Leonor of Castile and Leon. He died on 21 Sep 1327 in Berkeley Castle,Gloucester,Gloucester,England . When Charles Iv of France seized Edward's territories in that country, the English king sent Charles' sister Isabella who after Gaveston's death had managed to bear Edward four children, including the future Edward Iii, who now accompanied her to effect an amicable arrangement. She despised her husband, hated the Despensers and now fell in love with Roger Mortimer who, condemned to life imprisonment for rebellion, had escaped from the Tower in 1324 and fled to the French court.

Hertford Castle. It was the Normans who first built a castle in Hertford after the battle of Hastings, although the oldest walls still standing today were built as part of Henry II's strengthening works in the 1170's. Ever since, the castle has been the centre of the town and in continual use.

It was captured by the French in the 13th century, became a royal palace in the 14th century, and was home to Parliament and the Law Courts when Elizabethan London was gripped by Plague in the 1500's. Shortly after becoming King, Charles I granted Hertford Castle to William Cecil, the Earl of Salibury (whose descendants still own it) and since 1911 it has been used as council offices.

  1. King Charles IV of France was born about 1294 and died on 1 Feb 1328 in Vincennes, France and was buried in St. Denis, France . King Charles - married Blanche of Burgandy in 1307, Marie of Luxemburg in 1322 and Joan of Evreux in 1325.
"Philippe the Fair." King of France on Oct 5,1285 thru 1314. Philip fathered 4 sons and 3 daughters. He died in a hunting accident.
Note: Il gouverne en s'appuyant sur des lâegistes, imbus de l'autoritâe royale :
- Pierre Flote
- Guillaume de Nogaret
- Enguerrand de Marigny.
A la suite de son conflit avec le pape, il convoque les âetats gâenâeraux et fait arrãeter Boniface VIII en 1303. Il fait ensuite âelire un pape franðcais, Clâement V en 1305.
Il tente de pallier ses difficultâes financiáeres en âetablissant des impãots râeguliers, en taxant lourdement les Juifs et les Lombards et en pratiquant des dâevaluations monâetaires.
Il s'attaque áa l'ordre des Templiers dont il convoite les richesses, fait arrãeter ses chefs et obtient de Clâement V la suppression de l'ordre en 1312. Il fait condamner au bãucher les
dignitaires dont Jacques de Molay (1314).
Il augmente le domaine royal de Lyon et du Lyonnais (1312).
Note: Philippe IV, recumbent statue on his tomb. Ancestry.
Note:

Philip IV (of France), called The Fair (1268-1314), king of France (1285-1314), known for his conflict with the papacy. The son and successor of King Philip III, he was born in Fontainebleau. Through marriage he became the ruler of Navarre and Champagne. Between 1294 and 1296 he seized Guienne, in southwestern France, a possession of Edward I, king of England. In 1297 war ensued with England and with Flanders, England's ally. Under the terms of a truce made in 1299, Philip withdrew from Guienne and Edward withdrew from Flanders, leaving it to the French. A revolt broke out at Bruges, however, and at the Battle of Courtrai in 1302, the French army was disastrously defeated by Flemish burghers.

The great event of Philip's reign was his struggle with Pope Boniface VII, which grew out of Philip's attempt to levy taxes against the clergy. By the bull Clericis Laicos (1296) Boniface forbade the clergy to pay taxes to a secular power, and Philip replied by forbidding the export of coins, thereby depriving the pope of French revenues. A temporary reconciliation was ended by a fresh outbreak of the quarrel when Philip arrested the papal legate in 1301 and summoned the first French Estates-General. This assembly, which was composed of clergy, nobles, and burghers, gave support to Philip. Boniface retaliated with the celebrated bull Unam Sanctam (1302), a declaration of papal supremacy. Philip's partisans then imprisoned Boniface. The pope escaped but died soon afterward.

In 1305 Philip obtained the election of one of his own adherents as pope, Clement V, and compelled him to reside in France. Thus began the so-called Babylonian Captivity of the papacy (1309-77), during which the popes lived at Avignon and were subjected to French control.

In 1307 Philip arrested Grand Master Jacques de Molay of the Knights Templars, and in 1312 he forced the pope to suppress the religious and military order. Their wealth was confiscated by the king, and many members were burned at the stake. Also, as a result of his financial needs, Philip greatly increased taxes, debased the coinage several times, and arrested the Jews and the Lombards (Italian bankers), appropriating the assets of the former and demanding large subsidies from the latter. He died October 29, 1314, at Fontainebleau.

Note: KING OF FRANCE 1285-1314 (BECAME KING 10/5/1285, AND WAS CONSECRATED AT RHEIMS 1/6/1286); KNOWN AS "PHILLIP THE FAIR""LE BEL"; DIED OF A STROKE
Note: Philip IV, called "Le Bel" (1268-1314), king of France, began to reign in 1285. Like Philip Augustus he was resourceful and unscrupulous. For some years he was engaged in a quarrel with Boniface VIII. After an uneasy truce, the quarrel burst out again in 1300, Boniface issuing the bull Unam Sanctam, in which he reasserted his authority. Philip, supported by the States-general, in 1302 resisted the Pope, who was imprisoned for a few days at Anagni in S. Italy. On the election of Benedict XI the cardinals divided into two factions, French and Italian; and in 1305 the former triumphed in the accession of Clement V, who in 1309 fixed his residence at Avignon, where the popes remained for some seventy years. Clement supported Philip in his suppression of the Knights Templars (1307-12). Philip strengthened the royal authority, checked feudalism, supported the middle classes, and first summoned the States-general.He also increased the power and duties of the Parliament of Paris, and effected important changes with regard to the king?s council. [The Home University Encyclopedia, 1946]
Note: Philip IV (April-June 1268 ? November 29, 1314), called the Fair (French: le Bel), son and successor of Philip III, reigned as King of France from 1285 until his death. He was the husband of Joan I of Navarre, by virtue of which he was King of Navarre (as Philip I) and Count of Champagne from 1284 to 1305. The nickname Philip "the Fair" comes from his handsome appearance; it had nothing to do with his actions as King.
Note N6000000002248200898
(Philip the Fair), 1268?1314, king of France (1285?1314), son and successor of Philip III. The policies of his reign greatly strengthened the French monarchy and increased the royal revenues. Philip asserted his right to tax the clergy for the defense of the realm, thus making permanent a special tax permitted by the popes for support of crusades. Pope Boniface VIII </65/bo/Bonifc8.html> opposed this measure by the bull Clericis laicos (1296), but when threatened with loss of revenues from France he capitulated (1297). The conflict was revived by the arrest and condemnation by the king?s court (1301) of Bishop Bernard Saisset </65/sa/Saisset.html>. Boniface demanded that Saisset besent to Rome for trial, issued two bulls denouncing Philip, and called for a council at Rome in Nov., 1302. Philip, in retaliation, convoked the nobility, clergy, and commons in the first French States-General </65/st/StatesGe.html> (1302?3) to hear a justification of his course of action; and Boniface issued (1302) the bull Unam sanctam, an extreme statement of his right to intervene in temporal and religious matters. Threatened by excommunication, Philip had Boniface seized at Anagni. Although freed, Boniface soon died (1303). After the brief pontificate of Benedict XI, Philip secured the election as pope of Clement V </65/cl/Clement5.html>, who annulled Boniface?s bulls, and in1309 transferred the papal residence to Avignon, thus beginning the ?Babylonian captivity? of the papacy </65/pa/papacy.html>. Clement cooperated with Philip in his persecution of the Knights Templars </65/kn/KnightsT2.html>, whose wealth the king appropriated to finance his wars. Other wealthy groups persecuted by Philip were the Jews and the Lombards (Italian bankers). Philip also debased the coinage. Between 1294 and 1296, Philip overran Guienne, the duchy of King Edward I of England; in 1297 Edward came to the defense of his lands. A truce (1297) became (1303) a permanent peace, conceding Guienne to Edward. After the withdrawal of Edward, Philip turned his attention toward Flanders. He aided the Flemish towns against the count of Flanders, Guy of Dampierre, and after Guy?s defeat (1300), he imposed French rule on the Flemish. They rebelled and defeated (1302) the French at the disastrous battle of Courtrai. Although Philip was victorious over the Flemish in 1304, he was forced, in subsequent treaties, to reduce his demands on them. Philip was more successful in his attempts to expand at the expense of the Holy Roman Empire; Lyons and Viviers were incorporated into France during his reign. Philip summoned the States-General twice more (1308, 1314), chiefly to obtain support for his warfare. His son, Louis X, succeeded him.

Note: 1. Philip IV, The Fair of France, King of France (1285-1314), arrestedBishop Saisset in 1301 causing a quarrel with Pope BONIFACE VIII, whodenounced the king. Philip retaliated by convoking the firstSTATES-GENERAL in 1302-3 to hear a justification of his actions.Threatened with excommunication, Philip had Boniface seized and latergained control of the PAPACY with the election of CLEMENT V, whotransferred the papacy to Avignon in 1309. Beginning in 1294, Philiptried to conquer Guienne from EDWARD I of England, but was forced toconcede, in 1303, the duchy to Edward. His attempts to subdue theFlemish led to the disastrous French defeat in 1302 at Courtrai. Hisson, LOUIS X, succeeded him.

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Images: 3
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Philippe IV France
Philippe IV France

Philippe IV (Capet) France, coat of arms
Philippe IV (Capet) France, coat of arms

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On 22 Feb 2018 at 23:31 GMT Bree Ogle wrote:

You know something... Not sure, but I think this is the Philip -- along w/ wife Joan -- who is being characterized on the new History channel show "Knightfall."

On 31 May 2017 at 19:27 GMT Steve Selbrede wrote:

I cleaned this up somewhat. but more editing on the bio is needed.



Philippe IV is 28 degrees from Sharon Caldwell, 21 degrees from Burl Ives and 16 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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