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Philip Watson Challis (1617 - bef. 1680)

Lieutenant Philip Watson (Philip Watson) Challis
Born in Englandmap
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married 1652 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colonymap
Descendants descendants
Died before in Amesbury, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colonymap
Profile last modified | Created 3 Jan 2011
This page has been accessed 2,690 times.
[Note: Children need research: Surviving son John. Can't determine if a the second son named John died, and there was a 3rd John, no birth record for John in 1677/8; no mention in Philip's will of children's ages etc. Can't find references confirming 2 or 3 sons named Philip. Other references indicate widow Mary transferred deeds about 1688, and may have information on William being 'oldest' surviving son, indicating son Philip was deceased. Can't find source for deed online, nor her estate. ]
The Puritan Great Migration.
Philip Watson Challis migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
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Contents

Biography

Philip Watson Challis, who settled at Ipswich, Massachusetts by 1637, was born about 1617, the son of John and Elizabeth (Watson) Challis who were married in Sheering, Essex, England in 1612. Philip was named after his mother's brother Philip Watson. (p. 31)[1]

Philip Watson Challis is named in the will of his grandfather John Watson, Writtle Co., Essex, dated Sept. 19, 1618, as is his mother Elizabeth, wife of John Challis, and Philips' siblings Elizabeth and John Challis. (pp. 57-61)[2]

His parents, Elizabeth and John Challis, are named again in the will of Elizabeth's mother Alice (Halls) Watson, dated March 19, 1619/20, proved March 27, 1620. [2]

  • 1636: Philip Challis was granted at Ipswich: a house lot, 3 acres of planting ground, and 3 acres at Sagamore Hill. [3]
  • 1637: He was of Ipswich, Massachusetts [2]
  • Philip was one of the first settlers of Salisbury. (p. 55)[4]
  • 1639/40: In the first division of land at Salisbury, Philip Challice received one acres more or less of upland for a house lot and two acres of meadow. (p. 30)[5]
  • 1639: Nov. 7: Received a land grant in the first division at Colchester (later Salisbury) . (p. 28)[5] [6]
  • 1642: Sergt. Challis appointed commissioner for Salisbury by the General Court which was requiring each town to make/provide 'salt peeter.' [6]
  • 1644/5: Philip appointed to a committee by the General Court to lay out 600 acres. [6]
  • 1645: Nov. 4: Made a freeman at Salisbury, Massachusetts. [2](p. 5)[7]
  • 1647: Was one of the listed 'Prudential' men. [6]
  • 1646: Sept. 29: Philip among those appointed to Jury of Trials. (p.8) [7]
  • 1648: Dec. 18: On a committee to review bounds by Hampton. [6]
  • 1650/1: April 11: Philip purchased a house and dwelling lot in Salisbury and 2 acres meadow from George Martin for L13. (p. 22)[8] [6]
  • 1650: Dec. 30: Taxed at the town rate of 30ls. (p. 56)[4]
  • 1651: Feb. 10: Chosen for the committee to settle the bounds next to Hampton. [6]
  • 1651: Feb. 3: [1650: 3d 12 mo] Accounted among the townsmen and commoners at Salisbury. (p. 56)[4] [6]
  • 1653: Lt. Robert Pike denounced the General Court for enacting a law regarding the practice of preaching being only allowed 'regular ordained ministers of the church, which was aimed against the Baptists and Quakers. Pike was severely punished as no one had ever criticized or disputed the General Court. In the aftermath, petitions were drawn up in several towns in favor of Pike, which incensed the court further. Philip Challis was among the men who asserted that the 'right to petition' the court, the first time such proceedings had occurred in New England. [9] [6]
  • 1654: January 4: Philip was sued by Samuel Winsley for not paying for delivered goods. Winsley withdrew the action, Challis paying costs. [10]
  • 1654: March 14: Was one of the signers of the agreement set forth to establish the 'new towne'. [6]
  • 1654/5: March 19: Philip was listed as one of the men listed as inhabitants and commoners of the newly established town who were then designated to assemble the inhabitants whenever a concern arose . [6] [10]
  • 1659: Feb. 14: In the division of land to be reserved for 'the children' Philip Challis, received a portion for his son. [6]
  • 1660: Dec. 10: Philip Challis received a 'township' for his son John, aged 5. [6]
  • 1660: May 27: Philip Challis and Anthony Colby petitioned the General Court to have the new town established as a distinct town, they having obtained Mr. Dumer to help with the ministry. [6]
  • 1661: Feb.: Philip Challis was granted the frog pond. [6]
  • 1661: Feb. 12: Chosen a 'Prudential' man. [10]
  • 1662: March: In the great division, Philip was granted a lot of 200 acres. [6]
  • 1662: Appointed deputy. [6]
  • 1662: Oct. 14: Philip and wife Mary convey upland in Salisbury to George Carr. (p. 85)[11]
  • 1666: June 8: Philip among those appointed 'Prudential' men. [6] [10]
  • 1667: May 15: Lt. Challis and Richard Currier appointed by the General Court to collect contributions for the maintenance of the minister(s), and deliver it to those ministers. [6]
  • 1667: July 9: Philip was one of the townsmen chosen to appoint seats in the new church/meeting house. [6]
  • 1668: One of the three men chosen to 'end small cases.' [6]
  • 1669: Oct. 6: Philip Challis conveyed 20 acres in Amesbury (formerly Salisbury) to George Carr. His wife Mary released her dower, November 11, 1669. (p. 89) [12]
  • 1671: January 17: Philip Challis conveyed his fourth share in the sawmill on the Pawwaws River to Edward Gove for L30. (p. 89) [13]
  • 1673: April 6: Philip Challis member of the Grand Jury. (p. 147)[14]
  • 1673: April 29: Philip among those appointed to end small cases for Amesbury. (p. 165) [14]
  • 1674: The town claimed Philip had agreed to give a 50 acre lot to the town for the use of the ministry and sued him for the land. Philip won the trial by showing that the land had been granted him without any reservation or encumbrance. It appears he didn't object to providing the land, but did resent being 'driven to it' in court. [6] [10]
  • 1673/4: March: Philip and wife Mary did grant to the town by deed, the land for the ministry only, with restrictions that this land would be for no other future purpose than for that of the ministry. [6]
  • 1677: July: Philip was given one of the 42 seats at the meeting house. [3]
  • 1662-1679: During this time period he served on the Essex Grand Jury 10 times. [2]
  • 1646-1680: Served as Selectman. [2]

Military

  • 1642: Called Sergt. Challis. [6]
  • 1656: Oct.: The General Court allowed Tristam Coffin, John Stevens and Philip Challis and others, to list themselves ' a troope of horse.' [3]
  • 1658: May 26: Sergt. John Hoyt and Sergt. Stephens petitioned the court to have Philip Challis confirmed as 'Leftenant' to the foot soldiers at Salisbury. [6] [3]
  • 1658-80: Lieut. of the Foot Co., Salisbury 1658-80. [15]
  • 1680: May 10: Among the Freemen who petitioned the General Court regarding the appointment of new officers to the training band. (p. 76)[16]
  • 1680: June 11: Discharged as Lieut. of the foot company at Salisbury and appointed Lieut. of the Military Co. at Amesbury. [15] [3]

Family

He married Mary Sargent by 1652. [2] Mary was born about 1636, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Perkins) Sargent. She deposed on March 12, 1704/5, as being about 68 years of age. (p. 1631-2) [17]

In the will of Mary's father William Sargent, dated March 24, 1670/1, he made bequests of property and money to many of his children and grandchildren, including William, Elizabeth, Lydia, Mary, and Philip Watson Challis. He left a large part of the estate to his unmarried daughter Sarah, which would go to his other children, including Mary, should Sarah not leave heirs. [17] (p. 19-21)[18]

Philip died before October 21, 1680 [21: 8m: 1680] when his estate was inventoried. [2]

The inventory of his estate, given by his widow, attested to on March 29, 1681 included (in part)

  • house, barn, orchard and homestead
  • a lot of upland in the plains
  • a 'higglety piggly' lot
  • a great swamp lot
  • a lot behind Whitchers Hill
  • a lot in the oxe pasture
  • a bogsmore lot
  • a lot in the Children's land
  • a lot in the Champion ground
  • a lot in the great division
  • a lot in the 'peeke'
  • house and land at Jamiaca
  • the frog pond
  • a 'higglety piggly' lot of meadow
  • a beach 'barr' lot
  • a sweepage lot
  • a lot at the mouth of the blacl creek
  • lot in the tides meadow
  • a lot in the boggy meadows
  • a lot in the new meadows (p. 418-19) [19]

In the estate division on September 27,1681 at the Ipswich Court [Ipswich Deeds: Vol. 4: pp. 392, 416], the following are named:

  • widow Mary
  • eight children being: sons William, Philip, Thomas and John; and daughters Elizabeth, Lydia, Mary and Hannah [19]

His widow Mary died at Amesbury on Sept. 27, 1716. [20]

Children

  1. John born on July 9, 1653 [21]; died young. [18] (p. 89-90)[22]
  2. John born June 26, 1655 [21] [18] ; ?died before 1677. [22]
  3. Philip Watson, born on December 19, 1653[21]; died young. [22]
  4. William (twin) born on October 19, 1657 ; died Dec. 19, 1657. [21][18] [22]
  5. ?Philip (twin) born on October 19, 1657. [21][18] (uncertain if he's the Philip in his father's 1681 will, or if he died and another Philip was born c. 1670; brother William listed as Mary's 'eldest son' in 1688 deed.) [22]
  6. Elizabeth, born___ ; married first about 1685, John Hoyt III, son of John II; married second January 6, 1692/3 John Blaisdell. [22][20]
  7. William born on May 18, 1663; married January 2, 1698/9, Margaret Fowler. [21]: called 'eldest son' in 1688 deed.[22]
  8. Lydia born on May 31, 1665 [18][21]; married December 21, 1687, John Chase, son of Aquila. [21] [22]
  9. Mary born August 27, 1668; married May 25, 1687, Joseph Dow, son of Joseph. [21] [20][18] [22]
  10. ?? Philip Watson Jr. born about 1670; probably died between 1681 and 1693. A son Philip listed 1681 will; not listed on Mary's 1688 deed. [22]
  11. Thomas born on June 22, 1673; died March 12, 1752 (will probated April 6, 1652); married first, before September 3, 1696, Mary Colby; married second, Sarah Weed on September 22, 1727. [20] (p. 172-3)[23] [22]
  12. Hannah born on September 20, 1675 [20]; named in her fathers will of 1681. [22]
  13. ?? John born about 1677?; married January 26, 1698/9, Sarah Frame. [21] [22]

Source notes

Salisbury Births

Challis, John, s. Phillip Watson and Mary, 9: 5m: 1653. (p. 46)
Challis, John, s. Phillip Watson and Mary, 26: 4m: 1655. (p. 46)
Challis, Phillip, s twin Phillip [Wottson. CTR] and Mary, 19: ––m: [1658? Dec. 19, 1657. CTR](p. 46)
Challis, William, s. twin, Phillip [Wottson. CTR] and Mary, 19: ––m: [1658: Dec. 19, 1657. CTR] (p. 46)
Challis, William, s. Phillip Watson and Mary, 18: 3m: 1663. (p. 46)
Challis, Lidia, d. Phillip [Watson. CTR] and Mary, 31: 3m: 1665. [1666. CTR] (p. 46)

Salisbury Marriages

Chalic, John, and Sarah Frame, both of Amesbury, Jan. 26, 1698-9. NCTBK
Chalice, Lidia, and John Chace, Dec. 21, 1687. CTR
Challic, William, and Margrit Fowler, both of Amesbury, Jan. 2, 1698-9. NCTBK
Challis, Mary, and Joseph Dow Jr., at Amesbury, May 25, 1687.

Salisbury Deaths

Challis, William, s. Phillip Watson [and Mary. CTR], 19: 10m: 1657. [21]

Amesbury Births

Challis, Mary, d. Phillip and Mary, Aug. 27, 1668. CTR (p. 48)
Challis, Hannah, d. Phillip and Mary, Sept. 20, 1675. NTCR (p. 48)

Amesbury Marriages

Chalis, John, and Sarah Frame, at Salisbury, Jan. 26, 1698-9. (p. 302)
Challic, William, and Margaret Fowler, at Salisbury, Jan. 2, 1698-9. (p. 302)
Challis, Mary, of Salisbury, and Joseph Dow, jr., May 25, 1687. (p. 303)
Challis, Thomas, and Sarah Weed, d. George, Sept. 22, 1727. (p. 303)
Hoyt, Elizabeth, and John Blaisdell, Jan. 6, 1692-3. CTR (p. 384)

Amesbury Deaths

Challis, Mary, wid., Sept. 27, 1716.(p. 530)
Challis, Thomas, Mar. 12, 1752. (p. 530) [20]

Entered by Chris Hoyt 3 February 2012. See also:

  • Jacobus, D. L. The American Genealogist, Vol. 82, New Haven, CT. 2007 (pp. 265-6) (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009 - .)
  • Online publication - Sanborn, Melinde Lutz, comp.. Essex County, Massachusetts Depositions, 1636-86 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000.Original data - Index to the Deponent Records of the County of Essex, Massachusetts. Columbia Point, MA, USA: Massachusetts Archives, 1988.

Sources

  1. Great Migration Newsletter, Vol. 13., 2004. (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.)
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Mahler, Leslie. "The English Ancestry of Philip Watson Challis of Ipswich Massachusetts." The American Genealogist. Vol. 79 (2004). pp. 57-61. Link to pages at americanancestors.org.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Robinson, Hamline E. Symon, Indian : A Letter, written at Amesbury, Mass., 9: 5 mo: 1677 by Lieut. Philip Challis, Private Printing, Mayville, Missouri 1903
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 3, NEHGS, Boston, Massachusetts, 1849
  5. 5.0 5.1 Great Migration Newsletter, Vol. 8, 1999. (Online Database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.)
  6. 6.00 6.01 6.02 6.03 6.04 6.05 6.06 6.07 6.08 6.09 6.10 6.11 6.12 6.13 6.14 6.15 6.16 6.17 6.18 6.19 6.20 6.21 6.22 6.23 6.24 Merrill, Joseph. History of Amesbury: Including the First Seventeen Years of Salisbury, to the Separation in 1654; and Merrimac, from Its Incorporation in 1876, Franklin P. Stiles, Haverhill, Massachusetts, 1880
  7. 7.0 7.1 The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 8. Salem, Massachusetts, 1904
  8. The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 1, Salem, Massachusetts, 1897
  9. The Essex Antiquarian. Vol. 4, Salem, Massachusetts, 1900 p. 113-5
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Hurd, Duane H. History of Essex County, Massachusetts: With Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Volume 2, J. W. Lewis & Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1888
  11. The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 6, Salem, Massachusetts, 1902
  12. The Essex Antiquarian. Vol. 7, Salem, MA, 1903
  13. The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 10 Salem, Massachusetts, 1906
  14. 14.0 14.1 Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, Volume 5, 1672-74, The Essex Institute, Salem, Massachusetts, 1916
  15. 15.0 15.1 An Index of Ancestors and Roll of Members of the Society of Colonial Wars: The Honor Roll, Services of Members of the Society During the World War, 1917-1918 General Society of Colonial Wars (U.S.)
  16. New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 18, NEHGS, Boston, MA, 1864
  17. 17.0 17.1 Anderson, Robert C. New England Historic Genealogical Society, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III, 3 vols., NEHGS, Boston, MA,1995. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2010)
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 18.5 18.6 Sargent, Edwin E., compiler. The Sargent record : William Sargent of Ipswich, Newbury, Hampton, Salisbury and Amesbury, New England, U.S., with His Descendants and Their Intermarriages, and Other Sargent Branches. Caledonian Co., St. Johnsbury, Vermont, 1899.
  19. 19.0 19.1 Essex County, MA: Early Probate Records, 1635-1681, Vol. 3. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2015.
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 20.3 20.4 20.5 Vital Records of Amesbury, Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849, Topsfield Historical Society, Topsfield, MA, 1913
  21. 21.00 21.01 21.02 21.03 21.04 21.05 21.06 21.07 21.08 21.09 21.10 Vital Records of Salisbury, Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849, Topsfield Historical Society, Topsfield, MA, 1915
  22. 22.00 22.01 22.02 22.03 22.04 22.05 22.06 22.07 22.08 22.09 22.10 22.11 22.12 Hoyt, David W. The Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Massachusetts: With Some Related Families of Newbury, Haverhill, Ipswich, and Hampton, and of York County, Maine, Providence, Rhode Island, 1897
  23. Jacobus, D. L. The American Genealogist, Vol. 79, New Haven, CT. 1973 (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009 - .)

See also:

  • Nelson, Glade Ian. Thomas Sharpe and Philip Watson Challis; Family Connections Continued. in: The American Genealogist, Vol. 82, New Haven, Connecticut, 2007. p. 261-6 (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009 - .)

Acknowledgments

  • This person was created through the import of Weaver.ged on 03 January 2011.
  • WikiTree profile Challis-118 created through the import of Ancestors of PBHowe.ged on Jun 6, 2011 by Buck Howe.
  • WikiTree profile Challis-144 created through the import of Cato Family Tree_book_EN.ged on Sep 21, 2011 by Linda Cato.
  • Chris Hoyt started this profile 3 February 2012.


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This profile has been rewritten and sourced. Does anyone have an objection if I remove all the multiple dead links to ancestry and other sources at the end of the profile and just leave the contributors?
posted by Chris Hoyt

C  >  Challis  >  Philip Watson Challis

Categories: Puritan Great Migration