Jack (Chaney) London

John Griffith (Chaney) London (1876 - 1916)

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John Griffith (Jack) London formerly Chaney
Born in San Francisco, California, United Statesmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 7 Apr 1900 (to 11 Nov 1904) in Alameda, California, United Statesmap
Husband of — married 19 Nov 1905 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United Statesmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Glen Ellen, California, United Statesmap
Profile last modified 23 Feb 2020 | Created 21 Jan 2015
This page has been accessed 5,337 times.

Biography

Jack (Chaney) London is Notable.

Jack London was an American author, journalist, and social activist.

John "Jack" Griffith Chaney was born January 12, 1876 in San Francisco, California to William Chaney and Florence "Flora" Wellman. Chaney refused to acknowledge Jack as his son and caused Flora to attempt suicide in her anguish. A family took her and baby Jack in and introduced her to John London. She married John, who adopted Jack. The family was extremely poor, moving around to various jobs, with Jack spending much time alone, on the streets. Flora was a spiritualist and piano teacher. To help support his family, he worked as a newspaper delivery boy, cannery worker, ranch boy, sailor, fisherman, coal shoveler, longshoreman, and jute maker. He loved to read, and managed to fit in some high school while working. He started college at the University of California at Berkeley, hoping an education would help him move up the economic ladder, but dropped out before he completed his freshman year. Instead he handled his own education,, reading Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Kant, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, Adam Smith, and Immanuel Kant.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

Jack was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers. He wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics, such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes. Early in life, 1894, he joined Coxey's Army, a group of jobless men, and planned to march on Washington, D.C. to protest economic conditions. He changed his mind along the way there, and instead ended up in New York serving time in prison for vagrancy. While there, he was influenced by the writings of Karl Marx and Friedrich Nietzche. He was a member of the Socialist Labor party.[7]

Jack joined the Klondike Gold Rush in 1897, packing Darwin and Milton with him alongside his bacon and flour. He didn't make money on the endeavour and returned to California to write.[7]

Jack married Elizabeth "Bessie" Maddern on April 7, 1900 in Alameda, California.[8] They are recorded in the 1900 U.S. Census living in Oakland, California.[9] He insisted he hadn't married her for love, but because she suited what he was looking for in a mate, his philisophical beliefs influencing the decision. They had two children, Joan and Bessie (Becky), before divorcing in 1904.[7]

On November 19, 1905, Jack married Charmian Kittredge in Chicago, Illinois. He called her his "mate woman" and based many of his female characters on her. Their only child died at birth.[10][5][11][12][13][7]

Jack was a pioneer in the early 20th-century's burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone, the highest paid writer in the world by 1913. Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf. Much of what he wrote about was based on his own experiences which were varied due to his extensive travel.[3][4][6][14][15]

Jack died of uremic poisoning November 22, 1916 in Glen Ellen, California.[2][16][5][6] His ashes were buried on his estate, which was later acquired by the state of California and turned into Jack London State Historic Park Cemetery, Glen Ellen, Sonoma, California.[2]

Sources

  1. "United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6GG-ZTQ : 26 August 2017), John London in household of John London, Alameda, Alameda, California, United States; citing enumeration district ED 29, sheet 631B, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,254,062.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 01 December 2018), memorial page for Jack London (12 Jan 1876–22 Nov 1916), Find A Grave: Memorial #1889, citing Jack London State Historic Park Cemetery, Glen Ellen, Sonoma County, California, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVJP-QVLK : 16 March 2018), Jack London, 1902; citing Passport Application, New York, United States, source certificate #60709, Passport Applications, 1795-1905., Roll 607, NARA microfilm publications M1490 and M1372 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. 4.0 4.1 "United States Passport Applications, 1795-1925," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV5Y-VXZZ : 16 March 2018), Jack London, 1906; citing Passport Application, California, United States, source certificate #23474, Passport Applications, January 2, 1906 - March 31, 1925, 24, NARA microfilm publications M1490 and M1372 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "California Deaths and Burials, 1776-2000", database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:HKSN-8M3Z : 4 February 2020), Jack London, 1916.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 "Jack London Dead", The Girard Press, Girard, Kansas, 30 Nov 1916. Page 4. (See images for photo of article). Accessed via Newspapers.com 14 Feb 2020
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 Call of the Wild. Jack London, 1903. Introduction as published in Barnes and Noble edition 2003.
  8. Ancestry.com. California, Marriage Records from Select Counties, 1850-1941 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014. Ancestry Record 8797 #110453
  9. "United States Census, 1900," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M9PQ-11F : accessed 31 January 2020), Bessie London in household of Jack London, Oakland city Ward 7, Alameda, California, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 391, sheet 11A, family 235, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,240,083.
  10. Wikipedia contributors, "Jack London," Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jack_London&oldid=933822699 (accessed January 31, 2020).
  11. "United States Census, 1910," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MV2Q-SP5 : accessed 14 February 2020), Jack London, Oakland Ward 2, Alameda, California, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 96, sheet 1B, family 23, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 70; FHL microfilm 1,374,083.
  12. "United States Census, 1910," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MVGB-2PM : accessed 14 February 2020), Jack London, Glen Ellen, Sonoma, California, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 142, sheet 14B, family 171, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 109; FHL microfilm 1,374,122.
  13. Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Ancestry Record 2556 #352574
  14. Ancestry.com. California, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1959 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008. The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Customs Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at San Francisco; NAI Number: 4478116; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Record Group Number: 85 Ancestry Record 7949 #2818716
  15. Ancestry.com. California, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1882-1959 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008. The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Customs Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at San Francisco; NAI Number: 4478116; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Record Group Number: 85 Ancestry Record 7949 #1661374
  16. "California Death Index, 1905-1939," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QK91-BL8K : 8 November 2017), Jack London, 1916; citing 37108, Department of Health Services, Vital Statistics Department, Sacramento; FHL microfilm 1,686,046.

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Comments: 6

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I first met Jack during my fifth year of elementary school in Appalachia!

We were introduced by White Fang and our friendship was cemented by Buck. I have been captivated again and again by Jack's books and some of the movies they inspired. Much later, while living in nearby Sonoma California, my wife and I spent many afternoons at Wolf House, soaking in the atmosphere among Jack's collected treasures. The burned-out ruins of his original Wolf House were so very depressing!

posted by Raymond Dotson
edited by Raymond Dotson
This is so weird, my mother-in-law just sent her son this book with Three stories yesterday. The call of the wild, White Fang and The Sea Wolf. My Mother-in-law is from Bournemouth England and thought her oldest son would like this books she’s had for years. How neat.
posted by Nancy (Buxton) Burgess
As an urban youngster in England, Call of the Wild and To Light a Fire were great reading and stoked the imagination. Father hauled us over to Canada where initially, we lived in a rented farmhouse. Best of all were the woods and streams where I could build campfires, make lean-to's and fish - "Jack London-living" as it were. Many years later at the terminal of a camping trip, my wife and I enjoyed the history of and a day or two of life in Dawson City which included a big win at Diamond Tooth Gerties.
posted by Anthony Broscomb
Hi there profile managers!

We plan on featuring Jack as the Example Profile of the Week in the Connection finder on Feb 19th. Between now and then is a good time to take a look at the sources and biography to see if there are updates and improvements that need made, especially those that will bring it up to WikiTree Style Guide standards. I will check on the profile closer to the week we'll feature it and make changes as necessary.

Thanks! Abby

posted by Abby (Brown) Glann
There is a typo in the paragraph about his first marriage. The third sentence should start "He insisted he hadn't married her for love,..." instead of He insisted he hadn't married he for love,...

Cheers

posted by Gary Christopher
I married my wife for the same reason. I have depression, and it deadens my emotions, but we were an item from the moment we met.

I read White Fang and The Call of the Wild, but I hadn't heard of Jack's other activities. What is the badge shown on the "Connections" page?

posted by Doug Laidlaw

Jack is 15 degrees from Alice Paul, 19 degrees from Michael Schell and 16 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.