Samuel Chapin

Samuel Chapin (1598 - 1675)

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Deacon Samuel Chapin
Born in Paignton, Devonshire, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Paignton, Devonshire, Englandmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusettsmap
Profile last modified | Created 8 May 2014
This page has been accessed 6,459 times.
The Puritan Great Migration.
Samuel Chapin migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
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Contents

Biography

Samuel Chapin was born October 8, 1598 in Paignton, Devonshire, England[1][2] to John Chapin and his wife Phillipe Easton. [3][4] He was baptized October 8, 1598.[4][5][3] On February 9, 1623[4] at Paignton, England[4] he was united in marriage to Cicely Penny, daughter of Henry Penny from Paignton.[4][6][5][3]

Cicely Penny, wife of Samuel Chapin was born at Paington, England[4] and baptized there on February 21, 1601/2.[4][5] She was the daughter of Henry Penny and his wife, Jane[4] Dabinott.[5] Henry was a baker.[4] He died at Paignton, Devon County, England between April 6, 1630 and May 18, 1630 according to the dates of his will and inventory.[4][3] Samuel Chapin was one of four persons who took the inventory of his estate on May 18, 1630.[3] Henry Penny's wife Jane survived him.[4] Cicely, Deacon Chapin's wife, died February 8, 1638[7] in Springfield, Massachusetts.[8]

In England

It is possible that the Chapin family originated in Wales,[9][7] however, sources reveal that both his father and grandfather were born in England.[3] At the beginning of the book Family History: ancestors of Russell Snow Hitchcock, there is a family tree which indicates that a man named Roger Chapin is Samuel's grandfather,[4] and further pedigree begins on p. 353 of English Ancestry of Deacon Samuel Chapin.[3] Roger was born in England probably before 1540[3] since he had a daughter baptized at Totnes, England in 1560.[4][3] In addition to this daughter named Johan, Roger and his wife had four more children, one of which was John Chapin, Samuel's father, who was baptized on September 25, 1566.[4][3] On September 14, 1590 at Paignton this same John Chapin married Phillipe Easton.[4][8] Four children were born to John and Phillipe, Joane, Thomas, Samuel and Margaret.[8] Samuel, is the subject of this biography. John Chapin died at Paignton, England on June 3, 1600.[4][3] Phillipe was married (2nd) to George Stone in 1600/01.[3][4] He died between 1614 and 1616 and she survived him since she was the executrix of his will.[3]

Siblings of Samuel Chapin

  1. Joane, baptized June 26, 1591, and married James Narracot on July 9, 1611[8]
  2. Thomas, baptized March 8, 1596[8]
  3. Margaret, baptized November 16, 1600 and died December 11, 1600[8]

Why leave England?

Samuel Chapin, like many of the men and women who settled New England, came because of persecution, refusing to compromise their passionately held religious convictions.[5] These English Protestants wished to reform and purify the Church of England of the continued Roman Catholicism practices within the Anglican Church.[10][11] On their part, the Anglican Church and English Crown considered them extremists[10] and insisted that the Puritans conform to their religious practices which were abhorred by the Puritans.[11][12] Puritan ministers were removed from office and they along with parishioners received savage punishments.[11] For example, in 1630 a man was sentenced to life imprisonment, had his property confiscated, his nose slit, an ear cut off, and his forehead branded with the letters "S. S." meaning Sower of Sedition.[11] As a result of this religious persecution, beginning in 1630 as many as 20,000[10] Puritans emigrated to the new world from England to gain the liberty to worship God as they chose.[11]

In New England Following His Emigration

Samuel Chapin and his wife, along with five children came to America together in about 1638.[1][3] The New England Historical and Genealogical Record states that he came about 1638 and "brought with him from England a wife named Cicely and several children, Henry, Josiah, David, Catherine, and Sarah."[3][7] At any rate we know they came after October 29, 1637, which was the day his son Josiah was baptized at Berry Pomeroy, Devon County, England.[4]

Samuel Chapin settled first at Roxbury, Massachusetts[1] which had been founded in 1630 by William Pynchon[13] and he was a member of Rev. John Eliot's First Church of Roxbury.[5] Rev. John Eliot is the famous congregational minister who translated the Bible into the Algonquin Indian language and ministered to eleven hundred "Praying Indians" at one time.[12]

Samuel Chapin was "Made free on April 2, 1641,"[11] In other words, he was made a freeman of the church.[4][14][6][7] The history of taking oaths to protect the government and the church dates back to before Henry the Eighth when he renounced the authority of the Pope in 1534.[15] At that time an Act of Parliament was obtained declaring him the only supreme head of the Church of England and people were required to take an oath to this end, which included "acknowledgment heartily willingly and truly upon the true Faithe of a Christian..."[15] Later in New England, the charter of the Massachusetts Bay Company unwittingly gave the people liberty to admit new members called "Freemen" of the Company, and no conditions or qualifications were presented.[15] The Puritan leaders were quick to take advantage of the opportunity given them to frame their own Oaths of citizenship.[15] In May 1631, there was the following addition to the oath, "to the end the body of the commons may be prserued of honest and good men, it was likewise ordered and agreed that for time to come noe man shalbe admitted to the freedome of this body polliticke, but such as are members of some of the churches within the lymitts of the same."[15] It must be noted that no where in the Freemen Document is there a reference made to the King's Majesty, or of allegiance to any power on earth save that of their own Government in New England.[15] After taking the oath of a Freeman, men were entitled to hold office, assist in framing laws, and enforce those already made; and all their rights were protected[15] and they became church members.[8]

Most of the families who emigrated came from the west of England[13] and possibly it was because he had friends from there, that Samuel determined to settle in Roxbury.[13] He owned 24 acres of land[4] by 1639, as is shown by the Roxbury land records.[13] He bought a house there in Roxbury[16] His son Japhet was baptized in Roxbury on October 2, 1941[14] from James Howe[8] It was during this time of his residence in Roxbury, 1636 - 1637,[17] that the Pequot War took place.[13] The Pequot War was essentially a war to control the fur and wampum trade.[17] The Pequots were aligned with the Dutch, and the Narragansett with the English.[17] Following many battles and horrific bloodshed the Pequots lost the war and retreated south.[17] Following the war and the Pequot retreat, it was possible to settle with safety in Western New England.[13]

The winter of 1642 Samuel and his family moved to Springfield, Massachusetts in Western New England.[4][6][14][7][13](originally known by the name of "Agawam,"[6][13] where he was a prominent citizen[13] He was a deacon, a constable, a selectman, and a commissioner.[5][13][6] He owned land totaling forty-three acres[14] which implies he was probably a farmer. He paid twelve shillings in tax on these acres.[14] He first lived at the corner of the present (in year of Hitchcock book) Main and Pynchon Streets, but by 1664 he was living with his son Japhet at Chicopee.[4]

He was appointed by the General Court of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay to govern (magistrate)[4][7] the town of Springfield, Massachusetts with the power of a county court[4][6] and was voted to be one of six people to "lay out the lands...to an hundredth and fifty acres."[14][9] Further explanation of the position states that on July 26, 1644, Samuel Chapin along with 3 other men, were voted to "...have power to deele in all the prudentiall affaiers of the Towne to prevent anything they shall judge to be the dammagy ye Towne: & in this office they shall haue power for a yeere space & what this 5, or any three of them [shall order] shall be of full forc & virtue, alsoe to here complaints to Arbitrate controversies, to lay out High ways, to make Bridges, to repayer High waies,...to scowringe ye ditches, & to ye killing of wolves, & to ye training up ye children in some good caling or any other thing they shall judge to be to ye pfitt of ye Towne."[14][9] Samuel Chapin was annually re-elected to this office until 1652, when seven Townsmen were elected,[18] John Pychon and Samuel Chapin were the first two named,[14] and he acted in this office for a number of years, through 1673.[14] In these early days of the colonies, (whether in Roxbury, Springfield, or other towns in New England,) the union between church and state was very close and all the business affairs of the church, such as the building and care of the meeting house, the settling and support of the minister, etc., were transacted at the public meeting, in the same manner as any town business.[14] This union is seen in the matter of the wife of William Webb, who, it seems, was rebuked by the court and officers of Roxbury for weight of goods in the open market, for her habit of lying and shifting.[16] Four witnesses testified against her.[16] For these "grosse sins" she was excommunicated on August 23, 1642.[16] The record states, however, that she was reconciled to the church and thereafter lived Christianly.[16] There was a lot of power in the hands of a few, but it is noted that in Springfield, there was an effort to include all the male inhabitants in the affairs of the town, as in 1665 there was a decision to levy a fine on those men who did not attend the Town meeting or those who left the meeting early.[14] During the meetings, all questions of public policy were openly discussed, and each and every freeman had an equal right to participate in the debate and the propositions were finally decided by the vote of a majority of those present.[18] These meetings had the affect of joining the community into a coherent whole with common purposes.[18] Henry M. Burt states on p. 83 in his book Early Days in New England: Life and Times of Henry Burt of Springfield and some of His Descendants, "In a larger way these assemblages were nurseries of sound political ideas and practical schools in the rights and duties of citizenship...and in these most practical and efficient schools...were educated the men who took a large part in framing our state and national systems of government."

The early Church Records of Springfield were lost, so there is no way to determine when Samuel Chapin was chosen to the office of Deacon, however we know it was prior to 1649, since he is referred to as "Deacon Chapin" when he was granted a parcel of land by Agawam Falls.[14] At a town meeting held February 18, 1665, it was voted that Mr. Hollyoke and Henry Burt, along with Deacon Chapin, should supply the church during the vacancy of a pastor.[18] Thus he peached for several years when the town lacked a minister.[4] The Puritan preachers of the day sought the guidance of the Scriptures in regulating all aspects of the lives of their citizens.[11] For the rest of his life, he is frequently referred to as "Deacon Chapin" in the records of that town.[14]

Last Will and Testament

"In ye yeare, 1674:75 ye 4th of ye first Month I Sam Chapin of Springfeild in the County of Hampshire doe here make and ordaine this my Last will & testament Wherein I doe bequeath my Self this Body & Spirit into ye hands of my most Gracious god and mercifull ffather who hath magnified his mercy & free grace towards me in my Lord jesus Christ in whome I have Redemption through his blood even yt forgiveness of my Sins through ye worke of ye holy ghost working regeneration & a new Creation giving testimony of Redemption Adoption through faith in yeBlood of my Lord Jesus Christ who dyed for me and Rose againe yt I who had deserved Death might injoy Eternall life & by his Resurrection assureing me of my Resurrection to Eternll life & soe much ye more in ye hath given me my part in y first Resurrection on whome ye Second Death shall have noe Power.
"Idoe give to my Son Henry Chapin twenty shillings to be payd within one Yeare after my, Decease
"Alsoe to my Grand son Thomas Gilberd ten Pounds upon this Condition yt he serve out his time according to his Indenture yt is to say till hee attaine to ye age of one and twenty years
"All other my goodes and estate within Dores & without I give & bequeath to my wife whom I make and Ordaine my true & lawfull Executrix
In witness hereof I have here unto Sett my hand
"in ne Presence off
Japhet Chapin and his wife Abelene[14]

Death and Burial

Deacon Samuel Chapin lived to be quite elderly and having served in governing the town for over twenty years[13] he began handing the responsibilities to younger men in the town[13] and moved to northern part of Springfield (called Chicopee[4]) to live with his son Japhet.[4][13] In October 1675, Springfield was attacked by Indians and burned.[19] Deacon Chapin did not see the town rebuilt, for about a month later, he died,[3][6][5] November 11, 1675 to be precise,[4][13] as written by his son Japhet, "My father was taken out of this troubelsom world the 11 day of November about eleven of the clock in the eve, 1675."[8] He was buried in the Old Burying Ground, the cemetery that Deacon Chapin was instrumental in establishing in 1645.[5] Years of flooding swept away many of the original grave stones and remains of early settlers leaving no traces of their existence.[5] One Hundred Seventy Three years after the Deacon's death, in late 1848, Five Hundred Seventeen of the remains and headstones were relocated to Springfield Cemetery.[5] The Chapin's remains were not recovered[5] and it may be for this reason that descendant Chester W. Chapin commissioned the statue, "The Puritan" in 1881.[5]

Children of Samuel and Cicely Chapin

died in England
  1. A son (probably a twin) whose name was probably Samuel Chapin (but name is illegible in the registers) baptized at Berry Pomeroy in January 1630/1; buried at Berry Pomeroy July 10, 1634.[3]
  2. John Chapin, baptized at Totnes, County Devon, January 16, 1632/3; probably died in England[3]
  3. Honor (a daughter, baptized at Berry Pomeroy on May 8, 1636; probably died in England.[3]
born in England and emigrated with parents
  1. David, baptized at Paignton on January 4, 1624/5.[3] Married Lydia Crump on August 29,[14] 1654.[19] He resided for a few years in the center of the town of Springfield, and later moved to Boston.[7] Died August 1672 in Boston, Massachusetts[8]
  2. Katherin, baptized at Berry Pomeroy in 1626.[3] Married Nathaniel Bliss of Springfield, Mass on Nov 20,[14] 1646.[19] married 2nd, Thomas Gilbert of Springfield Mass on June 31, 1655.[14] 3rd married Samuel Marshfield of Springfield, Mass December 28, 1664.[14] Died February 4, 1712 in Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts [8]
  3. Sara, baptized at Berry Pomeroy in October 1628[3] Married Rowland Thomas of Springfield, Mass. on April 14,[14][7] 1647.[19] They had 13 children.[7] Died August 5, 1684 at Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts[8]
  4. Henry (probably a twin), [3] who was baptized at Berry Pomeroy in January 1630/1.[3] Married Bethiah Cooley[14] on December 15, 1664 and lived in Springfield, Massachusetts[14] the north part now called Chicopee.[14][7] Died August 15, 1718 at Springfield, Hampton, Massachusetts[8]
  5. Josias (Josiah), baptized at Berry Pomeroy on October 29, 1637.[3] Married Mary King in November of 1658.[14] Married 2nd Lydia (Brown) Pratt on September 20, 1676.[14] Married 3rd Mehetable Metcalf on June 22, 1713 and lived in Weymouth, Braintree, and Mendon, Massachusetts.[14][7] Josiah was one of the original grantees of Mendon, Worcester county, and built the first saw-mill in that place.[14][7] Died September 10, 1726 at Mendon.[8]
born in New England
  1. Japhet, baptized at Roxbury, Massachusetts on October 15, 1642.[4] Married Abilene Coley of Milford, Connecticut on July 22, 1664.[4] On May 31, 1711 he married Dorothy Root. [4] He died on February 20, 1712[4][8]
  2. Hannah, born at Springfield, Massachusetts on December 2, 1644[4] and baptized December 8, 1644.[4] Married John Hitchcock of Springfield, Massachusetts on September 27, 1666.[4] They had 9 children.[7] She died on May 21, 1719.[4][8]

Chapin Statue

The bronze Chapin Statue entitled "The Puritan" by Augustus St. Gaudens[13] was commissioned by Chester W. Chapin, Springfield's railroad magnate,[13] in 1885 to honor one of the town's founders.[13] The piety and perhaps moral rigidity of the country's religious founders is emphasized by the sculpted proud pose, certain stride, flowing cape and hefty Bible, as well as his assertive use of a walking cane.[5] The statue is 8 feet 7 1/2 inches tall.[5] It was originally unveiled on Thanksgiving Day, November 24, 1887,[13] in Stearns Square, Springfield, Massachusetts and remained there for twelve years.[13] At which time it was moved to it's current location in Merrick Park next to the Public Library in Springfield.[4][13] In this move, the bronze fountain and pink granite bench that were originally constructed to compliment the artwork were relocated to other parts of the city.[13] The working model of the statue is now owned by the Carnegie Museum of Art.[13]

"Remember the days of old, the years of many generations: ask thy father and he will shew thee: thy elders and they will tell thee." Deuteronomy 32: 7.[8]

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Directory: Immigrants to New England, 1620–1640 A Concise Compendium, (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historical and Genealogical, June 2015) Samuel Chapin, page 61
  2. Charles Edward Banks, Topographical dictionary of 2885 English Emigrants to New England, 1620 - 1650. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Elijah Ellsworth Brownell, The Bertram Press, 1937. Page 25
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18 3.19 3.20 3.21 3.22 3.23 3.24 New England Historical and Genealogical Register Vol 83 p 351 - 356
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15 4.16 4.17 4.18 4.19 4.20 4.21 4.22 4.23 4.24 4.25 4.26 4.27 4.28 4.29 4.30 4.31 4.32 4.33 4.34 4.35 4.36 Russell Snow Hitchcock, "A family history: recording the ancestors of Russell Snow Hitchcock; this includes the ancestral lines of Hitchcock, Andrews, Snow, Russell, Bardwell, Warriner, Pepper and their allied lines." Bath, Maine; Russell Snow Hitchcock, May, 1847, pp. 8, 9. Family Tree at beginning of book, chart 1.
  5. 5.00 5.01 5.02 5.03 5.04 5.05 5.06 5.07 5.08 5.09 5.10 5.11 5.12 5.13 5.14 Find A Grave memorial #7153097 in Springfield Cemetery, Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 Frederick Adams Virkus, The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy; first families of America; A genealogical encyclopedia of the United States, Chicago: A. N. Marquis & Company, publishers 1925. 6 volumes, Vol 1, p 971
  7. 7.00 7.01 7.02 7.03 7.04 7.05 7.06 7.07 7.08 7.09 7.10 7.11 7.12 Orange Chapin, The Chapin Genealogy: containing a very large proportion of the descendants of Dea. Samuel Chapin. (printers Metcalf & Company, 1862) 671
  8. 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 8.12 8.13 8.14 8.15 8.16 Gilbert Warren Chapin, The Chapin Book of Genealogical Data. (Published by Chapin family association, Hartford Connecticut, 1924.) Volume 1, Volume II.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 W. B. Gay, Gazetteer of Hampshire County, Massachusetts, 1654-1887, compiled and edited by W. B. Gay. Syracuse, New York: W. B. Gay & Company, 1886. Chapter VI, pp. 76, 77; 270
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Puritans, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, 1628 - 1686, Nathaniel B Shurtleff, ed., 5 Volumes in 6 (Boston 1853 - 1854). Vol 1 p 378
  12. 12.0 12.1 Religion and the Founding of the American Republic, America as a Religious Refuge: The Seventeenth Century, Part 1
  13. 13.00 13.01 13.02 13.03 13.04 13.05 13.06 13.07 13.08 13.09 13.10 13.11 13.12 13.13 13.14 13.15 13.16 13.17 13.18 13.19 13.20 13.21 Roots Web
  14. 14.00 14.01 14.02 14.03 14.04 14.05 14.06 14.07 14.08 14.09 14.10 14.11 14.12 14.13 14.14 14.15 14.16 14.17 14.18 14.19 14.20 14.21 14.22 14.23 14.24 14.25 Frank Farnsworth Starr, Various ancestral lines of James Goodwin and Lucy (Morgan) Goodwin, Hartford, Connecticut, 2 Vols (Hartford 1915). Vol 2: pp 123- 143
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 15.5 15.6 Charles Evans, Oaths of Allegiance in Colonial New England, 1921. American Antiquarian Society
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 Roxbury Land and Church Records, Sixth Report of the Boston Record Commissioners (Boston 1884) p 83
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 Battlefields of the Pequot War, Informing the Public About the Pequot War and the Preservation of the Battlefields, American Battlefield Protection Program, National Park Service
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 Henry M. Burt of Springfield and Silas W. Burt of New York, Early Days in New England. Life and Times of Henry Burt of Springfield and some of his descendants. Springfield, Massachusetts; Clark W. Bryan Company, Printers. 1893. Pages 77, 85, 25
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 Howard Millar Chapin, Life of Deacon Samuel Chapin of Springfield, Chapin Family Association Publications (Snow & Farnham Co., Printers Providence) 1908, pp 25, 32, 36. 37. 42-47
  • Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Directory: Immigrants to New England, 1620–1640 A Concise Compendium, (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historical and Genealogical, June 2015) Samuel Chapin, page 61 link
  • Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, 1628 - 1686, Nathaniel B Shurtleff, ed., 5 Volumes in 6 (Boston 1853 - 1854). Vol 1 p 378find at archive.org
  • Roxbury Land and Church Records, Sixth Report of the Boston Record Commissioners (Boston 1884) p 83find at mesafsl.org
  • Frank Farnsworth Starr, Various ancestral lines of James Goodwin and Lucy (Morgan) Goodwin, Hartford, Connecticut, 2 Vols (Hartford 1915). Vol 2: pp 123- 143find at archive.org
  • Gilbert Warren Chapin, The Chapin Book of Genealogical Data. (Published by Chapin family association, Hartford Connecticut, 1924.) Volume 1, Volume II. link
  • Orange Chapin, The Chapin Genealogy: containing a very large proportion of the descendants of Dea. Samuel Chapin. (printers Metcalf & Company, 1862) 671 link
  • Henry M. Burt of Springfield and Silas W. Burt of New York, Early Days in New England. Life and Times of Henry Burt of Springfield and some of his descendants. Springfield, Massachusetts; Clark W. Bryan Company, Printers. 1893. Pages 77, 85, 25link to Burt book
  • W. B. Gay, Gazetteer of Hampshire County, Massachusetts, 1654-1887, compiled and edited by W. B. Gay. Syracuse, New York: W. B. Gay & Company, 1886. Chapter VI, pp. 76, 77; 270 find at hathitrust.org
  • Russell Snow Hitchcock, "A family history: recording the ancestors of Russell Snow Hitchcock; this includes the ancestral lines of Hitchcock, Andrews, Snow, Russell, Bardwell, Warriner, Pepper and their allied lines." Bath, Maine; Russell Snow Hitchcock, May, 1847. pp. 8, 9. Family Tree at beginning of book, chart 1.see at hathitrust.org
  • Charles Edward Banks, Topographical dictionary of 2885 English Emigrants to New England, 1620 - 1650. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Elijah Ellsworth Brownell, The Bertram Press, 1937. Page 25see at Hathitrust.org
  • Frederick Adams Virkus, The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy; first families of America; A genealogical encyclopedia of the United States, Chicago: A. N. Marquis & Company, publishers 1925. 6 volumes, Vol 1, p 971 see at Hathitrust.org
  • Religion and the Founding of the American Republic, America as a Religious Refuge: The Seventeenth Century, Part 1link
  • Battlefields of the Pequot War, Informing the Public About the Pequot War and the Preservation of the Battlefields, American Battlefield Protection Program, National Park Service.link
  • Charles Evans, Oaths of Allegiance in Colonial New England, 1921. American Antiquarian Society link
  • Howard Millar Chapin, Life of Deacon Samuel Chapin of Springfield, Chapin Family Association Publications (Snow & Farnham Co., Printers Providence) 1908, pp 25, 32, 36. 37. 42-47.at archive.org
  • Howard Millar Chapin, Life of Deacon Samuel Chapin of Springfield, Chapin Family Association Publications (Snow & Farnham Co., Printers Providence) 1908, pp 48-49.[1]


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Images: 3
Samuel Chapin Image 1
Samuel Chapin Image 1

Deacon Samuel Chapin's Signature
Deacon Samuel Chapin's Signature

Deacon Samuel Chapin Statue
Deacon Samuel Chapin Statue

Collaboration

On 9 Nov 2017 at 21:28 GMT Jillaine Smith wrote:

To see who edited what on a given profile, click on the Changes tab.

On 9 Nov 2017 at 17:34 GMT Cheryl (Aldrich) Skordahl wrote:

Thank you, Caryl. It was a blessing for me to research and write the profile for this great Christian man, our mutual great grandfather. I enjoy hearing about this profile from so many cousins, his descendants are prolific!

On 9 Nov 2017 at 16:27 GMT Linda (Macintosh) Rodger wrote:

Thank you Caryl for your kind words, but I believe they are misdirected. I do not remember writing all that and have no clue as to who did. I believe we descendants of Samuel are legion.

On 9 Nov 2017 at 15:05 GMT Caryl (Short) Ruckert wrote:

What a beautiful profile, one of the best I have seen on wikitree. I enjoyed reading about Samuel. I love the way in which you honored our great grandfather! I am his 8th great granddaughter.

On 27 Oct 2017 at 02:28 GMT Cheryl (Aldrich) Skordahl wrote:

Christine, your words of appreciation are very special to me. Thank you.

Cheryl

On 27 Oct 2017 at 02:18 GMT Christine (Raffo) Zakary wrote:

I was so moved by my great grandfather's testemony of his faith, that I have copied it on to my computer screen to remind me on a daily basis what was the driving belief in salvation and a gracious God that energized these incredible PGM colonists. We can never understand these people without a window into their religious faith. Thanks so much for this beautifully done page and tribute to Deacon Samuel Chapin.

On 24 Sep 2017 at 02:09 GMT Cheryl (Aldrich) Skordahl wrote:

valuable source:

Vital Records from The NEHGS Register. Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (Compiled from articles originally published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register.) V. 83, p. 351 - 357.link for subscribers

On 13 Jul 2017 at 22:16 GMT Richard Draper wrote:

My 9th Great grandfather too!

On 13 Jul 2017 at 03:14 GMT Christine (Raffo) Zakary wrote:

In 1881, Chester W. Chapin, a railroad tycoon and congressman from Springfield, Massachusetts, commissioned[1] the renowned sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to create a bronze likeness of his ancestor, Deacon Samuel Chapin (1595–1675), one of the early settlers of the City of Springfield.[2] By 1881, Springfield had become one of America's most innovative industrial and manufacturing centers, and was one of the wealthiest cities in the United States.

The sculpture, cast at the Bureau Brothers Foundry in Philadelphia,[3] was unveiled on Thanksgiving Day, November 24, 1887 in Stearns Square, between Bridge Street and Worthington Street - a collaboration between the artistic "dream team" of Stanford White (of the renowned architecture firm McKim, Mead, and White) and Saint-Gaudens - and featured numerous sculptural and landscape architectural details to enhance the sculpture. In 1899 the statue was moved to Merrick Park, on the corner of Chestnut and State Streets, one of Springfield's most important intersections (now part of the Quadrangle cultural center). It has remained there ever since.[4]

This impressive sculpture of the The Deacon can be found next to the palatial Springfield City Library. The base is inscribed: "1595 Anno Domini 1675 Deacon Samuel Chapin One Of The Founders Of Springfield"

On 26 Sep 2016 at 23:06 GMT Cheryl (Aldrich) Skordahl wrote:

Chapin-1001 and Chapin-671 appear to represent the same person because: clear duplicate. Same name, birth & death dates & places. Please merge. Thank you.

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