William Clark

William Clark (1770 - 1838)

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William Clark
Born in Caroline County, Colony of Virginiamap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Fincastle, Botetourt, Virginia, United Statesmap
Husband of — married in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, United Statesmap
Descendants descendants
Died in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, USAmap
Profile last modified | Created 3 Aug 2011 | Last significant change: 9 Jun 2018
23:17: Philip Smith deleted a message from Philip Smith on the page for William Clark. [Thank Philip for this]
This page has been accessed 14,531 times.

Categories: American Heroes | Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri | Missouri Territory Governors | Namesakes US Counties | Notables | Lewis and Clark Expedition Project.

Notables
William Clark is notable.
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William Clark was involved in the westward expansion of the USA.
Join: Lewis and Clark Expedition Project
Discuss: Lewis and Clark Expedition

Preceded by
3rd Territorial Governor
Benjamin Howard
William Clark
4th Governor of Missouri Territory[1]
State Seal of Missouri
1813–1820
Succeeded by
1st Governor of Missouri
Alexander McNair

Contents

Biography

  • Clark County can be found in four U.S. states: Arkansas, Missouri, Montana (Lewis and Clark County), and Washington

William Clark learned many of his wilderness skills from his famous older brother George Rogers Clark. William was an army officer engaged in various battles with the Native Americans. Among his soldiers was Ensign Merwether Lewis whom he befriended. Meriwether later became the personal secretary to Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson selected Lewis to lead the " Corps of Discovery", an exploratory expedition into the newly-purchased Louisana Territory, and Lewis in turn selected his friend William Clark to accompany him. Clark was the Military leader and cartographer of the expedition. He made numerous maps and drawings,and kept journals of their experiences.

Part of the explorer team of Lewis and Clark

Notes for William Clark: Note: Captain William (Lewis& Clark) Clark Brother of George Rogers Clark Co-leader of the Lewis & Clark Expedition, May 1804-September 1806 Bridg. General of the Louisiana Militia Superindant of Indian Affairs Indian Fighter, War of 1812 Veteran Governor of Missouri Territory, 1813-21

William Clark was born in Caroline County, Virginia, on August 1, 1770, the ninth of ten children of John and Ann Rogers Clark. His parents were natives of King and Queen County, and were of English and possibly Scots ancestry. The Clarks were common planters in Virginia, owners of modest estates and a few slaves, and members of the Anglican Church.

Name

William /Clark/[2][3]


Birth

Date: August 1, 1770
Place: Caroline, Va[4]


Marriage

Husband: William Clark
Wife: Judith Julia Hancock
Child: Elisha Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Isaac Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: William Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Andrew Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Abraham Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: John Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Meriwether Lewis Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: William Preston Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Mary Margaret Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: George Rogers Hancock Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: John Julius Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Jefferson Kearny Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Edmund Clark
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Marriage:
Date: 5 Jan 1808
Place: Fincastle, Botetourt, Virginia, United States[5][6]

Burial

Bellefontaine Cemetery, Saint Louis, St. Louis City Missouri, USA Plot: Block 224, Lot 780[7]

Legacy

  • Clark Counties in the states of Arkansas, Missouri, and Washington are named in William Clark's honor.

Biography

William was born in 1770. He was the son of John Clark and Ann Unknown. He passed away in 1838.

President Bill Clinton posthumously promoted him to Captain in 2001. He had five children with his first wife. William Clark From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 4th Governor of Missouri Territory In office July 1, 1813 – September 18, 1820 Appointed byJames Madison Preceded byBenjamin Howard Succeeded byAlexander McNair Personal details BornAugust 1, 1770 Ladysmith, Colony of Virginia DiedSeptember 1, 1838 (aged 68) St. Louis, Missouri Spouse(s)Julia Hancock (1808–1820; her death) Harriet Kennerly Radford (1820–1831; her death) RelationsGeneral Jonathan Clark (brother) General George Rogers Clark (brother) Ann Clark Gwatmey (sister) Captain John Clark (brother) Lieutenant Richard Clark (brother) Captain Edmund Clark (brother) Lucy Clark Croghan (sister) Elizabeth Clark Anderson (sister) Frances "Fanny" Clark O'Fallon Minn Fitzhugh (sister) ParentsJohn Clark III, Ann Rogers Clark Occupation soldier, explorer, politician William Clark (August 1, 1770 – September 1, 1838) was an American explorer, soldier, Indian agent, and territorial governor.[1] A native of Virginia, he grew up in prestatehood Kentucky before later settling in what became the state of Missouri. Clark was a planter and slaveholder.[2]

Contents [hide] 1Early life 2Military career begins 3Lewis and Clark Expedition 4Indigenous nations and war 5Marriage and family 6Later life and death 7Legacy and honors 8References 9General references 10Further reading 11External links Early life William Clark was born in Caroline County, Virginia, on August 1, 1770, the ninth of ten children of John and Ann Rogers Clark.[4][5] His parents were natives of King and Queen County, and were of English and possibly Scots ancestry.[6] The Clarks were common planters in Virginia, owners of modest estates and a few slaves,[7] and members of the Anglican Church.

Clark did not have any formal education; like many of his contemporaries, he was tutored at home. In later years, he was self-conscious about his convoluted grammar and inconsistent spelling—he spelled "Sioux" 27 different ways in his journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition—and sought to have his journals corrected before publication.[8] The spelling of American English was not standardized in Clark's youth, but his vocabulary suggests he was well read.[9]

Clark's five older brothers fought in Virginia units during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), but William was too young.[6] His oldest brother, Jonathan Clark, served as a colonel during the war, rising to the rank of brigadier general in the Virginia militia years afterward. His second-oldest brother, George Rogers Clark, rose to the rank of general, spending most of the war in Kentucky fighting against British-allied American Indians. After the war, the two oldest Clark brothers made arrangements for their parents and family to relocate to Kentucky.

William, his parents, his three sisters, and the Clark family's slaves arrived in Kentucky in March 1785, having first traveled overland to Redstone Landing in present-day Brownsville, Pennsylvania. They completed the journey down the Ohio River by flatboat. The Clark family settled at "Mulberry Hill", a plantation along Beargrass Creek near Louisville. This was William Clark's primary home until 1803. In Kentucky, his older brother George Rogers Clark taught William wilderness survival skills.[10]

Military career begins Kentuckians fought the Northwest Indian War against American Indians, who were trying to preserve their territory north of the Ohio River. In 1789, 19-year-old William Clark joined a volunteer militia force under Major John Hardin.[11] Clark kept a detailed journal of the expedition, beginning a lifelong practice. Hardin was advancing against the Wea Indians, who had been raiding settlements in Kentucky, on the Wabash River. In error, the undisciplined Kentucky militia attacked a peaceful Shawnee hunting camp, where they killed a total of eight men, women, and children.[12]

In 1790, Clark was commissioned by General Arthur St. Clair, governor of the Northwest Territory, as a captain in the Clarksville, Indiana militia. One older source says he was sent on a mission to the Creek and Cherokee, whom the US hoped to keep out of the war, in the Southeast. His responsibilities are unclear.[13] He may have visited New Orleans at that time. His travels prevented him from participating in General Josiah Harmar's disastrous campaign into the Northwest Territory that year.[14]

In 1791, Clark served as an ensign and acting lieutenant with expeditions under generals Charles Scott and James Wilkinson.[15] He enlisted in the Legion of the United States and was commissioned as a lieutenant on March 6, 1792 under Anthony Wayne. On September 4, 1792 he was assigned to the 4th Sub-Legion. He was involved in several skirmishes with Indians during the continuing Northwest Indian War.[13] At the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794, Clark commanded a company of riflemen who drove back the enemy on the left flank, killing a number of Native Americans and Canadians. This decisive US victory brought the Northwest Indian War to an end. In 1795, Clark was dispatched on a mission to New Madrid, Missouri. Clark also served as an adjutant and quartermaster while in the militia.[15]

Lewis and Clark Expedition Main article: Lewis and Clark Expedition See also: Timeline of the Lewis and Clark Expedition William Clark resigned his commission on July 4, 1796 and retired due to poor health,[15] although he was only 26 years old. He returned to Mulberry Hill, his family's plantation near Louisville.[15]

In 1803, Meriwether Lewis recruited Clark, then age 33, to share command of the newly formed Corps of Discovery, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana Purchase, establish trade with Native Americans and the sovereignty of the US. They were to find a waterway from the US to the Pacific Ocean and claim the Oregon territory for the United States before European nations did.[3] Clark spent three years on the expedition to the Pacific Coast. A slave owner known to deal harshly with his slaves, he brought York, one of his slaves, with him. The indigenous nations treated York with respect, and many of the Native Americans were interested in his appearance, which "played a key role in diplomatic relations".[16][17]

Although Clark was refused a promotion to the rank of captain when Jefferson asked the Senate to appoint him, at Lewis' insistence, he exercised equal authority, and continued the mission. Clark concentrated chiefly on the drawing of maps, the management of the expedition's supplies, and leading hunting expeditions for game.[18]

Indigenous nations and war In 1807, President Jefferson appointed Clark as the brigadier general of the militia in the Louisiana Territory, and the US agent for Indian affairs. At the time, trade was a major goal and the US established the factory system. The government and its appointees licensed traders to set up trading posts in Native American territory. Native American relations were handled in what became the War Department.[15] Clark set up his headquarters in St. Louis, Missouri.

There he became a member of the Freemasons, a secret fraternal group. The records of his initiation do not exist, but on September 18, 1809, Saint Louis Lodge No. 111 issued a traveling certificate for Clark.[19]

As a reward for their contributions during their expedition to the Pacific Lewis and Clark were given government positions. Jefferson appointed Meriwether Lewis territorial governor of Upper Louisiana, commander-in-chief of the militia, and superintendent of Indian Affairs.[20] Although he was in charge of Indian affairs, Clark was under the supervision of the Governor of the Louisiana Territory. The governor had final say of all decisions made in the territory. Although Clark had primary duties in dealing with the Native Americans, "the territorial governor held the title of ex officio superintendent of Indian affairs.[21]

Clark's experiences during his cross-continent expedition gave him the tools to be the ideal candidate for a diplomat to the Native Americans. That was Jefferson's motives behind giving Clark these duties, although it would not be until Madison's presidency that Clark's title became official. President James Madison appointed Clark as Missouri territorial governor and thus ex officio superintendent of Indian affairs in that region, during the summers of 1808 and 1813. In the earlier period, Clark performed the same duties that he would have if he held the title.[22] During the years while Clark held position under Governor Lewis, he was continuously involved in decisionmaking with him. Clark was consulted on affairs on a regular basis. In Louisiana and Missouri, Clark served the United States government for the longest term in history as diplomat to the Native American peoples.

Indian diplomacy occupied much of Clark's time; the dutiful soldier and bureaucrat never wavered in his commitment to an expansionist national agenda that expected Indians to surrender their lands, abandon their traditional ways, and acquiesce to the dictates of the U.S. government. But he was aware of the consequences and he demonstrated genuine concern for the plight of destitute native people increasingly threatened with extinction.[23] Clark's expeditions and frontier settlement gave him unique views and feeling

Sources

  • Fact: Burial (3 Sep 1838) Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Fact: Burial (3 September 1838) Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Fact: http://familysearch.org/v1/LifeSketch Captain William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. President Bill Clinton posthumously promoted him to Captain in 2001. He had five children with his first

William Clark From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 4th Governor of Missouri Territory In office July 1, 1813 – September 18, 1820 Appointed byJames Madison Preceded byBenjamin Howard Succeeded byAlexander McNair Personal details BornAugust 1, 1770 Ladysmith, Colony of Virginia DiedSeptember 1, 1838 (aged 68) St. Louis, Missouri Spouse(s)Julia Hancock (1808–1820; her death) Harriet Kennerly Radford (1820–1831; her death) RelationsGeneral Jonathan Clark (brother) General George Rogers Clark (brother) Ann Clark Gwatmey (sister) Captain John Clark (brother) Lieutenant Richard Clark (brother) Captain Edmund Clark (brother) Lucy Clark Croghan (sister) Elizabeth Clark Anderson (sister) Frances "Fanny" Clark O'Fallon Minn Fitzhugh (sister) ParentsJohn Clark III, Ann Rogers Clark Occupationsoldier, explorer, politician William Clark (August 1, 1770 – September 1, 1838) was an American explorer, soldier, Indian agent, and territorial governor.[1] A native of Virginia, he grew up in prestatehood Kentucky before later settling in what became the state of Missouri. Clark was a planter and slaveholder.[2]

Sources

  1. On June 4, 1812, the Territory of Louisiana was renamed to the Territory of Missouri to avoid confusion with the newly admitted state of Louisiana formed from the Territory of Orleans.
  2. Source: #S-2022256079 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=momarriages&h=11379467&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Marriage date: 28 Nov 1821Marriage place: St Louis APID: 1,1171::11379467
  3. Source: #S-2127643531 Page: Birth year: 1770; Birth city: Caroline Co; Birth state: VA. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genepool&h=504310&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1 August 1770Birth place: Caroline Co, VAMarriage date: 5 January 1808Marriage place: Fincastle APID: 1,4725::504310
  4. Source: #S-2127643531 Page: Birth year: 1770; Birth city: Caroline Co; Birth state: VA. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genepool&h=504310&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1 August 1770Birth place: Caroline Co, VAMarriage date: 5 January 1808Marriage place: Fincastle APID: 1,4725::504310
  5. Source: #S-2022256079 Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=momarriages&h=11379467&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Marriage date: 28 Nov 1821Marriage place: St Louis APID: 1,1171::11379467
  6. Source: #S-2127643531 Page: Birth year: 1770; Birth city: Caroline Co; Birth state: VA. Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=genepool&h=504310&ti=0&indiv=try&gss=pt Note: Data: Text: Birth date: 1 August 1770Birth place: Caroline Co, VAMarriage date: 5 January 1808Marriage place: Fincastle APID: 1,4725::504310
  7. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=202 Find A Grave Memorial# 202]

Acknowledgements

  • WikiTree profile Clark-5025 created through the import of altic Family Tree.ged on Aug 3, 2011 by Todd Altic. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Todd and others.




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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with William by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with William:

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William Clark
William Clark

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On 30 Aug 2017 at 01:43 GMT Lisa (Kelsey) Murphy wrote:

Source: Dennis, Yvonne Wakim and Hirschfelder, Arlene, A Kid's Guide to Native American History, pgs 116-117 and 126, Chicago Review Press, 2010

On 16 Jan 2017 at 23:33 GMT Kelly (Sullivan) Rishor wrote:

References:

"The History of the Lewis and Clark Expedition", Edited by Elliott Coues, in three volumes. volume 1, back insert, 1893, reprinted regularly. Also see: The Drapier Manuscripts: 65 volumes Filson Historic Society

On 11 Dec 2014 at 10:38 GMT Paula J wrote:



William is 15 degrees from Chet Atkins, 16 degrees from Edie Kohutek and 13 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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