Lucretia (Coffin) Mott

Lucretia (Coffin) Mott (1793 - 1880)

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Lucretia Mott formerly Coffin
Born in Nantucket, Massachusetts, USAmap
Ancestors ancestors
Wife of — married in Pine Street Meeting, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USAmap
Died in Cheltenham, Pennsylvania, USAmap
Profile manager: J. Salsbery private message [send private message]
Profile last modified | Created 6 Jul 2013
This page has been accessed 4,801 times.

Categories: Pearson-3638 Notables | Activists and Reformers | Nantucket, Massachusetts | Millbrook, New York | Cheltenham, Pennsylvania | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | Fair Hill Burial Ground, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | Nine Partners Monthly Meeting, New York | Philadelphia Pine Street Monthly Meeting, Pennsylvania | American Anti-Slavery Society | This Day In History January 03 | US Civil Rights Activists | American Suffragettes | Notables.

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Lucretia (Coffin) Mott was a part of the Suffragette Movement.
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Contents

Biography

Lucretia Coffin was born in Nantucket, Massachusetts, the second child of eight by Thomas and Anna (Folger) Coffin.

Education

At the age of thirteen, she was sent to the Nine Partners Quaker Boarding School in what is now Millbrook, Dutchess County, New York, which was run by the Society of Friends. There she became a teacher after graduation.

Women's Rights

Her interest in women's rights began when she discovered that male teachers at the school were paid three times as much as the female staff. After her family moved to Philadelphia, she and James Mott, another teacher at Nine Partners, followed.

Marriage

On April 10, 1811, Lucretia Coffin married James Mott at Pine Street Meeting in Philadelphia. They had six children. Their second child, Thomas Coffin, died at age two. Their surviving children all became active in the anti-slavery and other reform movements.

Abolitionist

Lucretia Mott was a member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. In June 1840 she attended the General Anti-Slavery Convention. Activists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and her husband Henry B. Stanton attended the convention while on their honeymoon. Stanton admired Mott, and the two women became friends and allies.

Death

Mott died on November 11, 1880 of pneumonia at her home, Roadside, in Cheltenham, Pennsylvania. She was buried in the Quaker Fairhill Burial Ground in North Philadelphia. Her Memorial has pictures, a biography, and a link to her husband, James' Memorial

She is commemorated in a sculpture by Piablo Picasso at the Carrier Dome, Syracuse, unveiled in 1997.[1]

Obituary

On This Day
November 12, 1880
By THE NEW YORK TIMES
Lucretia Mott died last evening at her residence, near Philadelphia, in her eighty-eighth year. Mrs. Mott, whose name was probably as widely known as that of any other public woman in this or the preceding generation, was born in the old whaling town of Nantucket on the 3d of January, 1793. Her maiden name was Coffin. When 11 years old, her parents removed to Boston, where she went to school, finishing her education at a young ladies' boarding school in Dutchess County, N.Y., in which, when only 15 years old, she became a teacher.
In 1809 she rejoined her parents, who had removed to Philadelphia, and in 1811, two years later, was married to James Mott. She was then in her nineteenth year. Her husband went into partnership with her father, Mr. Coffin, and Mrs. Mott again turned her attention to educational matters. In 1817 she took charge of a school in Philadelphia, and in 1818 began to preach. She made extended pilgrimages through New-England, Pennsylvania, Maryland and parts of Virginia advocating Quaker principles and waging at the same time a vigorous warfare against the evils of intemperance and slavery. In the division of the Society of Friends in 1827 she adhered to the Hicksites. Mrs. Mott took a prominent part in organizing the American Anti-Slavery Society in Philadelphia in 1833, and was a delegate to the famous World's Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840, where, in company with other female delegates, she was refused admission on account of her sex. She was also prominent in the original Woman's Rights Convention held at Seneca Falls, N.Y., in 1848, over which her husband, James Mott, presided. During the last 30 years she has been conspicuous in such gatherings and in annual meetings of the Society of Friends. Among her published works are "Sermons to Medical Students" and "A Discourse on Women."

Sources

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucretia_Mott

  1. This is a brief sketch taken from a much larger work at Lucretia Mott - Wikipedia


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Collaboration

On 18 Mar 2015 at 08:47 GMT Jill (Turkington) Lee wrote:

Lucretia Coffin Mott

Birth: Jan. 3, 1793 Nantucket Nantucket County Massachusetts, USA Death: Nov. 11, 1880 Cheltenham Montgomery County Pennsylvania, USA

Quaker Abolitionist, Suffragist, and Educator. Lucretia Coffin was born in Nantucket, Massachusetts, and raised a Quaker. Lucretia married James Mott in 1811. In 1821, the couple moved to Philadelphia, and as a Quaker minister, Lucretia began her work. Quakers differed from other religions in their equal treatment of women. Like other Quakers, Mott was active in the abolitionist movement. Philadelphia Yearly Meeting had a strong anti-slavery position as early as 1758 through the work of John Woolman. Mott’s contribution to the abolition movement lay in her clear and reasoned explanation of how political advocacy could improve the pos

On 18 Mar 2015 at 08:18 GMT Jill (Turkington) Lee wrote:

On This Day

November 12, 1880 OBITUARY Lucretia Mott By THE NEW YORK TIMES Lucretia Mott died last evening at her residence, near Philadelphia, in her eighty-eighth year. Mrs. Mott, whose name was probably as widely known as that of any other public woman in this or the preceding generation, was born in the old whaling town of Nantucket on the 3d of January, 1793. Her maiden name was Coffin. When 11 years old, her parents removed to Boston, where she went to school, finishing her education at a young ladies' boarding school in Dutchess County, N.Y., in which, when only 15 years old, she became a teacher. In 1809 she rejoined her parents, who had removed to Philadelphia, and in 1811, two years later, was married to James Mott. She was then in her nineteenth year. Her husband went into partnership with her father, Mr. Coffin, and Mrs. Mott again turned her attention to educational matters. In 1817 she took charge of a school in Philadelphia, and in 1818 began to preach. She made extended pilgrimages through New-England, Pennsylvania, Maryland and parts of Virginia advocating Quaker principles and waging at the same time a vigorous warfare against the evils of intemperance and slavery. In the division of the Society of Friends in 1827 she adhered to the Hicksites. Mrs. Mott took a prominent part in organizing the American Anti-Slavery Society in Philadelphia in 1833, and was a delegate to the famous World's Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840, where, in company with other female delegates, she was refused admission on account of her sex. She was also prominent in the original Woman's Rights Convention held at Seneca Falls, N.Y., in 1848, over which her husband, James Mott, presided. During the last 30 years she has been conspicuous in such gatherings and in annual meetings of the Society of Friends. Among her published works are "Sermons to Medical Students" and "A Discourse on Women."



Lucretia is 24 degrees from Rosa Parks, 20 degrees from Anne Tichborne and 14 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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