Isaac (d'Israeli) Disraeli

Isaac (d'Israeli) Disraeli (abt. 1766 - 1848)

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Isaac Disraeli formerly d'Israeli aka D’Israeli
Born about in Enfield, Middlesex, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Brother of [half]
Husband of — married in Bevis Marks Synagogue, Londonmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Bradenham, Buckinghamshire, Englandmap
Profile last modified | Created 20 Jan 2016
This page has been accessed 384 times.

Categories: Notables.

Contents

Biography

Notables
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Biography

Isaac D'Israeli was a British writer, scholar and man of letters. He is best known for his essays, his associations with other men of letters, and as the father of British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.[1]

Isaac was born in Enfield, Middlesex, England, the only child of Benjamin D'Israeli, a Jewish merchant who had emigrated from Cento, Italy in 1748, and his second wife, Sarah Syprut de Gabay Villa Real. Isaac received much of his education in Leiden. At the age of 16, he began his literary career with some verses addressed to Samuel Johnson. He became a frequent guest at the table of the publisher John Murray and became one of the noted bibliophiles of the time.[2]

Name Change

The spelling of the name at birth for all family members of the Earl of Beaconsfield's generation and before, was apparently d'Israeli. There seems to be some debate about when this changed to 'Disraeli', the Wikipedia entry claiming that it was in 1822 when Benjamin Disraeli was an articled clerk, whilst Robert Blake in his biography states that it was changed for him by his father prior to attending school. Nonetheless, it seems likely that he and his siblings would initially have been known as d'Israeli as would all members of the previous two generations.

Sources

Isaac D'Israeli at Wikipedia

References

Isaac was born in 1766. Isaac Disraeli ... He passed away in 1848.

Sources

  1. Isaac D'Israeli at Wikipedia
  2. Isaac D'Israeli at Wikipedia


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No known carriers of Isaac's Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA have taken yDNA or mtDNA tests.

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Isaac d’Israeli
Isaac d’Israeli

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On 12 Dec 2017 at 21:18 GMT J. (Pearson) Salsbery wrote:

Disraeli-13 and D'Israeli-6 are not ready to be merged because: The two different mothers has to be resolved first.

On 12 Dec 2017 at 16:43 GMT Derek Allen wrote:

Disraeli-13 and D'Israeli-6 appear to represent the same person because: A notable individual, it is quite evidently the same person.

On 12 Dec 2017 at 14:50 GMT J. (Pearson) Salsbery wrote:

D'Israeli-6 and Disraeli-13 are not ready to be merged because: The pending merge for his mother should be completed first.

On 3 Nov 2017 at 22:50 GMT Derek Allen wrote:

D'Israeli-6 and Disraeli-13 appear to represent the same person because: Historically significant individual. Profiles are palpably the same person.

On 20 Jan 2016 at 14:01 GMT J. (Pearson) Salsbery wrote:

It appears that the spelling of the name at birth for all family members of the Earl of Beaconsfield's generation and before, was d'Israeli . There seems to be some debate about when this happened, the Wikipedia entry saying that it was in 1822 when Benjamin Disraeli was an articled clerk, whilst Robert Blake in his biography states that it was changed for him by his father prior to attending school. Nonetheless, it seems likely that he and his siblings would initially have been known as d'Israeli as would all members of the previous two generations.



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