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John Dane II (abt. 1612 - bef. 1684)

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Dr. John Dane II aka Dean, Deane
Born about in Barkhamstead, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married before in Englandmap
Husband of — married (to ) in Essex Co., Massachusettsmap
Descendants descendants
Died before in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusettsmap
Dane-11 created 28 Jan 2010 | Last modified
This page has been accessed 1,385 times.

Categories: Puritan Great Migration | Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire | Hatfield, Hertfordshire | Roxbury, Massachusetts | Ipswich, Massachusetts.

[Note: The maiden name of his mother Frances, is sometimes listed as possibly Rowley, but is unconfirmed. ]

[Note: As there were 3 generations of John Danes in the area at this time, it is difficult to identify John I, John II and John III in town service, as some dates overlap and their being of age. Occasionally identification as to Jr. or Sr. is noted in records. However, most noted in this profile, would relate to John II, as John I deceased in 1658 and John III would not likely been of age to be appointed in the timeframe.]

The Puritan Great Migration.
John Dane II migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
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Contents

Biography

John Dane Jr. was baptized about 1613 in Little Barkhamstead, Herts, England, [1] son of John Dane Sr., born at Barkhamstead, England, about 1587; died in Roxbury, Massachusetts where he was buried Sept . 14,1658 and Frances (?Rowley), who came to America with him. There is some doubt about the maiden name of his first wife.[2] [3]

His parents were strict and serious, following the teachings of Rev. John Norton. At the age of about 16 to18 , John ran away from home, as his father had disciplined him for going to dancing school. [3] Having learned the tailoring trade from his father, he was able to find employment at Barkhemstead. [3] [1]

He then was apprenticed to Mr. Tidd of Hertford, but once qualified, he admitted to 'considerable restlessness' in his early twenties. [1]

He considered traveling to St. Christopher's or the West Indies, but as the Spaniard's had captured the islands in 1629, he remained in England, and then was a butler for Robert Barrington, placed there by Rev. John Norton. [3] [1]

He married Eleanor Clarke, and in practicing his trade as tailor in Hatfield, where there was a recession, the established tailors in that town attempted to drive out the newcomer. [1] [2]

John Dane Jr. was the first of his family to come to America, though his parents followed soon after. [2] [3]

He emigrated first to Roxbury, then to Ipswich in 1636, following his religious mentor Rev. Norton. His trade as a tailor was competitive in Ipswich and he styled himself a surgeon and called himself as such in his will. [1] [3]

  • 1635/6: February 22: An entry in the Barrington household record of Hatfield, Broad Oak, Essex, England, shows the sum of 00-05-00, given to John Dane for his 'goeing to Newe England'. [4]
  • 1635: Emigrated to New England, settling in Roxbury, Massachusetts. [1] [3]
  • c1636: Removed to Ipswich. [1] [3]
  • 1647: 30: 1: A John Dane was appointed to the Jury of Trials. [5]
  • 1651: 30: 7: A John Dane was appointed to the Jury of Trials. [6]
  • 1654: 26: 7: John Dane served on the Grand Jury and the Trial Jury. [7]
  • 1657: March 31: A John Dane sworn as constable at Ipswich. [8] [9]
  • 1660: Sept. 25: John Dane appointed to the Grand Jury. [9]
  • 1661: His house was 'burnt.' [3]
  • 1662: March 25: John Dane appointed to the Jury of Trials. [9]
  • 1664: Had one and half shares of in the division of Plum Island. [3]
  • 1664-69: Served as selectman. [3]
  • 1675: Sept. 28: A John Dane assigned to the Grand Jury. [10]
  • 1676: March: John Dane Sr. was released from trainings. [10]
  • 1676: March 30: In settling the estate of Freegras Norton, the court approved the appraisal amount of L24 12s 6d, for work Norton had completed for Doctor Dane.[10]
  • 1676: Dec. 4: John Dane testifying to being about 64 years, gave a deposition in the case of Daniel Hovey v. John Lee. [10]

After the death of his wife Eleanor, Dr. John Dane Jr. married secondly Alice (Dutch) Newman, daughter of Osgood Dutch and widow of John Newman. [11]

John Newman died in Nov., 1673. On March 31, 1674, relict Alice Newman was granted administration of his estate which was divided between the widow and a brother and sister of John, but no children are mentioned. [11]

On March 29, 1676, a legal suit against Richard Lee, for debts owed was won by John Davis, represented John Dane and his wife Alice, administratrix of the Newman estate, so their marriage occurred between March, 1674 and March, 1676.[11]

Dr. John Dane, the chirurgeon, died Sept. 29, 1684. [12][13] In his will written on May 31, 1684, he names:

  • his wife Alice
  • sons John and Philemon
  • daughters Sarah and Elizabeth
  • grandchildren Mary Chandler and Daniel Hovey [14][3]

After the decease of John Dane, Alice married Jeremiah Meacham of Salem, Massachusetts, by about 1685 [11] and died before May 4, 1704. [15]

John Dane is the author of one of the earliest surviving chronicles of New England colonial life, "A Declaration of Remarkable Providences in the Course of My Life". [16]

Children

  1. Mary born about 1636; died May 10, 1679; married August 24, 1658, William Chandler of Andover, Massachusetts. [3]
  2. Elizabeth born ___; married in about 1653, Reginald Foster Jr. who born in England about 1636, son of Reginald and Judith Foster. [3][17]
  3. John born at Ipswich about 1644; died December 23, 1707; married December 27, 1671, Abigail Warner, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (___) Warner of Ipswich Massachusetts. [3]
  4. Sarah born about 1645; died December 28, 1702; married September 23, 1668, Daniel Warner Jr. of Ipswich, Massachusetts, brother to Abigail , who died November 24, 1696. [3]
  5. Philemon born about 1646; died October 18, 1716; married first October 7, 1685, Mary Thompson; married second December 25, 1690, Ruth Converse of Woburn, Massachusetts.[3]
  6. Rebecca married James Hovey (sic). [3] [Note: Rebecca appears to have married Daniel Hovey, and to have died at about the time their only child was born, son Daniel, in 1665. (Daniel, brother to James Hovey - who married Priscilla Warner).] [18]

Source notes

Ipswich Deaths

DANE, John, sr., Sept. 29, 1684.(p. 536)[12]

New England Marriages

NEWMAN, John ( - 1672) & Alice DUTCH ( - 1794) m/2 John Dane by 1676; m/3 Jeremiah MEACHAM ( +1684: b. 1648, b. 1643 Ipswich. (p. 533)
DANE, John ( - 1684) & Alice [DUTCH] [NEWMAN] , w. John; m/3 Jeremiah MEACHAM; 1684 Ipswich. (p. 202)
MEACHAM, Jeremiah (1613-1695) & 2/wf Alice [DUTCH] [NEWMAN] [DANE] (- 1734) w. of John, w. of John; aft. Sept. 1684, Salem. (p. 500)ref>Torrey, Clarence Almon & Elizabeth Petty Bentley. New England Marriages Prior to 1700</ref>


Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Thompson, Roger. Mobility and Migration: East Anglian Founders of New England, 1629-1640, University of Massachusetts Press, June 1, 2009 pp. 95-100; 192; 234
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 A Porter Pedigree: Being an Account of the Ancestry and Descendants of Samuel and Martha (Perley) Porter of Chester, N.H., who Were Descendants of John Porter, of Salem, Mass., and of Allan Perley, of Ipswich, Massachusetts 1907 p. 85
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 Noyes, Charles P. Noyes-Gilman Ancestry: Being a Series of Sketches, with a Chart of the Ancestors of Charles Phelps Noyes and Emily H. (Gilman) Noyes, His Wife, Gillis Press, New York, 1907 p. 294-6
  4. Walne, Peter. Emigrants from Hertfordshire 1630-1640: Some Corrections and Additions. in: The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 132. NEHGS, Boston, Massachusetts, 1978 p. 18-19
  5. Ipswich Court Records and Files in: The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 8. Salem, Massachusetts, 1904 p. 9
  6. Ipswich Court Records and Files in: The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 9. Salem, Massachusetts, 1905 p. 131
  7. Perley, Sidney, editor. Ipswich Court Records and Files in: The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 10. Salem, Massachusetts, 1906 p. 177
  8. Ipswich Court Records and Files in: The Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 11. Salem, Massachusetts, 1907 p. 118
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 Dow, George Francis. Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts: Vol. 2. 1656-1662. The Essex Institute, Salem, Massachusetts, 1912 p. 11; 225; 347
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 Dow, George Francis. Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts: Vol. 6: 1675-1678, The Essex Institue, Salem, Massachusetts, 1917 pp. 132; 205; 238
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 Anderson, Robert Charles. Great Migration: Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume V, M-P. NEHGS, Boston, Massachusetts, 2007 p. 252-2 (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2010.)
  12. 12.0 12.1 Vital Records of Ipswich Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849, The Essex Institute, Salem, Massachusetts, 1910
  13. Chandler, George. The Chandler Family: The Descendants of William and Annis Chandler who Settled in Roxbury, Mass., 1637, Press of C. Hamilton, 1883 p. 12
  14. Case 7099: p.1-7: Essex County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1638-1881.Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014. (From records supplied by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Archives.)
  15. Cutter, William R. Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, Volume 1 , Lewis historical Publishing Company, 1908
  16. Dane, John A Declaration of Remarkable Providences in the Course of My Life (Samuel G. Drake, Boston, Massachusetts, 1854)
  17. Forster, Edward Jacob. The Genealogy of the Fo[r]ster Family Descendants of Reginald Fo[r[ster of Ipswich, Mass. in: The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. 30, NEHGS, Boston, Massachusetts 1876 pp. 83-87
  18. Daniel Hovey Association. The Hovey Book: Describing the English Ancestry and American Descendants of Daniel Hovey of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Press of Lewis R. Hovey, 1914 p. 16


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On 12 Nov 2014 at 20:46 GMT Kyle Dane wrote:

Dane-106 and Dane-11 appear to represent the same person because: I'm pretty sure these two are referring to the same person. From what I've read, "Dr" is appropriate because he was referred to with that title, but I don't know that he had formal medical training, so "MD" is probably not right. I haven't seen any reference to support the parentage of John Dane the father, either, but I think that can be dealt with on his profile



John is 15 degrees from Kevin Bacon, 16 degrees from Lucrezia Borgia, 15 degrees from Emma MacBeath, 18 degrees from Charles Schulz and 18 degrees from Queen Elizabeth II Windsor on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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