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John L. Davis (abt. 1830 - 1863)

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John L. Davis
Born about in White, Tennessee, United Statesmap [uncertain]
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Husband of — married 4 Feb 1852 in White, Tennessee, United Statesmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Murfreesboro, Rutherford, Tennessee, United Statesmap [uncertain]
Profile last modified 27 Aug 2019 | Created 31 Oct 2010
This page has been accessed 358 times.

There were a few men by the name of John Davis living in the same broad area at the same time. They were not the same man.

Contents

Biography

John was born about 1830 in White County, Tennessee.[1] He is the son of Simon Davis and Nancy Womack. He died on 19 January 1863 at Murfreesboro, Tennessee as a result of wounds suffered in the Civil War. He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tennessee.[2]

John married Mary Jane Jones on 4 February 1852 in White County, Tennessee.[3][4]

Civil War Service

John Davis enlisted for the Confederacy at Sparta on Sept 20, 1862 at Sparta in Company Captain as a Private at the age of 30. Severely wounded in leg at Battle of Murfreesboro Dec 31, 1862 and was sent to hospital. He died a prisoner of war at Murfreesboro, Tennessee as a result of the gunshot wound, on January 19, 1863.[5]

The Battle of Stones River

Murfreesboro December 31 - January 2, 1863

With morale flagging as the Civil War dragged into its second year, Abraham Lincoln and General-in-Chief Henry Halleck sought to unleash a strategic combination that would produce a decision in the bloody struggle. They sought to take advantage of their material superiority over the South, launching a three-pronged coordinated offensive that would overwhelm the Confederacy's ability to shift reinforcements along its interior lines. As Gen. Ambrose Burnside advanced in Virginia and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant advanced in Mississippi, the responsibility for Tennessee, the strategic central position, fell to Gen. William S. Rosecrans. On December 26, Rosecrans's army left Nashville and marched on Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg's position at Murfreesboro.

The two armies met on a battlefield on the banks of Stones River on the evening of December 30. Both generals formed plans of attack for the next morning while their soldiers uneasily slept on their muskets--in some places the opposing lines were less than four hundred yards apart. On December 31, Bragg's dawn assault struck home before the Union army could form for its own attack. After six hours of savage fighting the Confederates bent the Union line nearly in half, but Gen. Phil Sheridan organized a determined defense in a cedar thicket now known as the "Slaughter Pen" and prevented disaster. Braxton Bragg, seeking to dislodge Sheridan and splinter the line once and for all, spent the afternoon directing a series of assaults on a salient that had formed in the Round Forest, or "Hell's Half-Acre." The Southerners went in piecemeal and were unable to carry woods.

Having inflicted severe damage on the Union army, Bragg spent the day of January 1 waiting for Rosecrans to retreat. When January 2 dawned with Rosecrans still in position, Bragg realized that his own situation was becoming untenable. The Federals had managed to reform into a strong defensive line and they would soon be receiving heavy reinforcements. That afternoon, Bragg ordered Gen. John Breckinridge's division to seize a hill that could function as a deadly artillery platform in the Union rear. Breckinridge objected on the grounds that his men would be advancing across an open field under cannon fire towards a numerically superior foe, but Bragg overruled him. Breckinridge's division was shattered in the determined charge. With no cards left to play, Bragg ordered a retreat.

The Battle of Stones River was a strategic Union victory. The grand offensive had failed to the east (The Battle of Fredericksburg) and west (The Battle of Chickasaw Bayou), but Rosecrans's success in Middle Tennessee reassured the weary Northern public. Braxton Bragg's army spent months paralyzed by an officers' revolt that sought to remove Bragg from command as punishment for his failure at Stones River. When Rosecrans launched his next attack in the summer of 1863, he took the bickering Confederates by surprise and forced them into Georgia. The Battle of Stones River secured Union control of Middle Tennessee for the remainder of the war. After his October 1862 defeat at Perryville in Kentucky, Gen. Braxton Bragg withdrew his army into central Tennessee and resupplied his men near Murfreesboro. Although his Army of Tennessee had received reinforcements, Bragg seemed hesitant to conduct offensive operations. The Union Army of the Cumberland, now commanded by Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans, also loitered in mid-Tennessee and resupplied around Nashville. Rosecrans received orders to move against Bragg, and finally did so in late December. Moving south, the Union force met the Confederates along Stones River just north of Murfreesboro. On December 31st, both commanders made plans to attack his opponents right flank, but Bragg struck first, pulverizing the Union right with two veteran divisions and driving it back three miles. Heavy fighting on both sides ensued as Bragg bent Rosecrans' line around nearly into a circle. Rosecrans held on during the night and into January 1st, and false reports indicating a Union retreat kept Bragg in place also. On January 2nd, Rosecrans still stubbornly held his ground. Maj. Gen. John Breckinridge's division attacked the Union left late that afternoon and nearly achieved a breakthrough, but massed artillery broke up the assault. Both sides held their ground as the fighting ended on January 3rd. Although the battle was a tactical draw, the Union repulse of two attacks and the arrival of reinforcements made Bragg’s position untenable and dashed Confederate aspirations for control of Middle Tennessee. Bragg retreated on January 3rd, granting the North a valuable strategic victory in the middle of an otherwise dismal winter.

BATTLE FACTS RESULT

Union Victory COMMANDERS UNION

William S. Rosecrans CONFEDERATE

Braxton Bragg FORCES ENGAGED 76,400 Union 41,400


Confederate 35,000 TOTAL ESTIMATED CASUALTIES 24,645 Union 12,906 1,677 killed 7,543 wounded 3,686 missing & captured Confederate 11,739 1,294 killed 7,945 wounded 2,500 missing & captured

From: Civil War Trust

Sources

  1. 1850 census
  2. Find A Grave: Memorial #44963790
  3. "Tennessee, White County Records, 1809-1975," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QPQ6-LF2Z : 29 November 2018), John W Davis and Marry Jane Jones, 4 Feb 1852; citing Marriage, White, Tennessee, United States, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville; FHL microfilm 005701166.
  4. Holcomb, Brent H. Marriages of Rutherford County, North Carolina, 1779–1868. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1986.
  5. Source: #S865196934
  • "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MC63-PHX : 12 April 2016), John Davis in household of Davis, White county, White, Tennessee, United States; citing family 600, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 06 June 2019), memorial page for John W Davis (1830–19 Jan 1863), Find A Grave Memorial no. 44963790, citing Evergreen Cemetery, Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tennessee, USA ; Maintained by Ken Ellis (contributor 47192601) .
  • Source: S865196934 Repository: #R850877097 U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current Ancestry.com Publication: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
  • Repository: R850877097 Ancestry.com
  • Source: S328736798 Repository: #R303178512 Tennessee, Compiled Marriages, 1851-1900 Ancestry.com Publication: Ancestry.com Operations Inc

See also:

Acknowledgments

  • This person was created through the import of Pioneer Stock.GED on 31 October 2010.


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Memories: 4

On 16 Dec 2017 Anonymous Leep wrote:

I am ashamed to admit this but it must be said to clear the confusion. John L Davis kept enslaved people and was a Confederate. Zachariah remembers the Yankees burning their plantation holdings. Our branch of the Davis family moved to Arkansas and later Oklahoma as refugees of the Civil War. They lost and it was justice, but the story is burned into our family by older generations that didn't call it justice.

[edit/delete]


On 16 Dec 2017 Anonymous Leep wrote:

John L Davis has been confused with John W Davis. The grave marker is incorrect. A later descendent put inaccurate information on a marker believed to be that of our ancestor. Either the marker is wrong or the burial site is not one belonging to our Davis branch.


On 16 Dec 2017 Anonymous Leep wrote:

I just spoke with my 90-year-old aunt who insisted there were no Loveland members in our family. We had stories about the Jones family that were told to my aunt Elma.

The Loveland family has a very well-documented family tree that traces the descendants of two brothers throughout the US. My branch of the Davis family is in no way connected to that interesting family with their own family stories.


On 12 Dec 2017 Anonymous Leep wrote:

My 90-year-old aunt, Elma Horn White (oldest daughter of Lula Davis Horn), remembered Zachariah telling her that his Dad's name was John L Davis and John L Davis died when Zachariah was only 12-14 years old. Important to note is that my aunt distinctly remembers the middle initial being L.

Zach told my aunt, a child at the time, that his mother worked hard every day of the week just so they could have pork on Sundays. His Mom was the person that moved the family West with other Davis families when her and her husband's barns, home, and crops were burned in the Civil War.

Zachariah's mother is buried in Sequoyah Co., Oklahoma. Nowhere in the family stories is the last name of Loveland mentioned.



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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with John by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with John:

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On 26 Oct 2018 at 22:38 GMT Anonymous Leep wrote:

Davis-34900 and Davis-1905 appear to represent the same person because: Commonalities...

On 19 Dec 2017 at 09:00 GMT Anonymous Leep wrote:

John L Davis was the father of Mary Susannah (Davis) Lollis and Zachariah R Davis.

On 18 Dec 2017 at 05:48 GMT Anonymous Leep wrote:

Davis-34900 and Davis-49039 appear to represent the same person because: My John L was being confused with John W Davis, but your John L has the same ancestors as mine according to names mentioned in old family stories.

On 16 Dec 2017 at 23:43 GMT Anonymous Leep wrote:

I am ashamed to admit this but it must be said to clear the confusion. John L Davis kept enslaved people and was a Confederate. Zachariah remembers the Yankees burning their plantation holdings. Our branch of the Davis family moved to Arkansas and later Oklahoma as refugees of the Civil War. They lost and it was justice, but the story is burned into our family by older generations that didn't call it justice.

On 16 Dec 2017 at 23:24 GMT Anonymous Leep wrote:

I just spoke with my 90-year-old aunt who insisted there were no Loveland members in our family. We had stories about the Jones family that were told to my aunt Elma.

The Loveland family has a very well-documented family tree that traces the descendants of two brothers throughout the US. My branch of the Davis family is in no way connected to that interesting family with their own family stories.

On 11 Dec 2017 at 07:40 GMT Anonymous Leep wrote:

John W. Davis and John L. Davis are not the same people. John L. Davis died in the Civil War with an injury related illness according to Zachariah Davis as told to Elma Horn, his grand-daughter.




John is 20 degrees from Tanya Lowry, 11 degrees from Charles Tiffany and 15 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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