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Henry Dixon (abt. 1633 - abt. 1688)

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Henry Dixon aka Dickson, Dixson
Born about in Lurgan, County Armagh, Irelandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Son of [uncertain] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married about in Irelandmap
Descendants descendants
Died about in New Castle, Chester, Pennsylvaniamap [uncertain]
Profile last modified | Created 3 Jan 2011
This page has been accessed 3,759 times.

Categories: Lurgan Quaker Meeting, Armagh.

Quakers
Henry Dixon was a Quaker.
Join: Quakers Project
Discuss: quakers

Contents

Biography

Name

Henry Dixon[1][2][3][4]

Birth

Birth: Date: 1633 in Lurgan, Nir, Armagh, Northern Ireland [5] [6]

Found multiple copies of BIRTH DATE. Using 1633

Marriage

Marriage: Date: 1660 in New Castle, New Castle, Delaware, USA [7] [8][9]

Husband: Henry Dixon
Wife: UNKNOWN Rose
Child: Dinah Dixon
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: Rose Dixon
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural
Child: William Dixon
Relationship to Father: Natural
Relationship to Mother: Natural

Death

Death: Date: 1667 in New Castle, New Castle, Delaware[10][11][12]

Henry Dixon was born in Ireland about 1630.[13][14] Previous profiles included Seagoe Parish with County Armaugh for place of birth. Death dates and places also varied slightly, with one profile showing his death in 1667. One profile had death as 1687.[14] A death date of 1688, and the additional information of Christiana Hundred (in Newark, Delaware), was in another profile.

The Dixon family came to Delaware from northern Ireland, where they had been members of Lurgan Meeting, the same Meeting with which the Hollingsworths had been affiliated. "The parents were Henry and Rose Dixon. . . . three of their children - William, Dinah, and Rose - were part of the Newark Meeting community."[15]

The "family" that came from Ireland in 1688 did not include Henry, according to details in his son William's profile, which included William's 1683 marriage in Ireland that was witnessed by his parents, Henry and Rose Dixon,[16] and that his widowed mother came with him to America in 1688, along with two of her daughters/his sisters, Dinah and Rose (this daughter of Rose is the Rose Dixon who married Thomas Pierson).

Children of Henry Dixon include:[17]

i. William, d. in 1708; m. Anna Gregg, dau. of William Gregg, in 1690.
ii. Dinah, m. Michael Harlan 1 mo 1690
iii. Rose, m. Thomas Pierson, widower and deputy surveyor of New Castle

Various Dixons appear in the records of Armagh dating to the 1670s. The 1664 Hearth Tax Rolls for Armagh also show a John Dixon and William Dixon. Marriage records from the Quaker meeting at Lurgan show a “Will Dixon and Antho. Dixon” as witnesses at the marriage of Valentine Hollingsworth and Ann Calvert on the 12th day of the 4th month in 1672. In 1664 Hollingsworth is listed in BalleMcCrannell Townland, a short distance from Drumlisnegrilly Townland. Valentine Hollingsworth was to later settle in Delaware in 1682 in the same locality where our Dixon ancestors settled on coming to America. Records from 1676 show a Thomas Dixson and Henry Dixson. In the 1680s, a William Dixson is mentioned various times. While these various Dixons were likely related to our Dixon ancestors, that relationship, if any, is not presently known. Records from Lurgan Quaker meetings show our Henry Dixson and Rose Dixson appearing as witnesses to the marriage of William Dixson and Isabelle Rea at the home of Roger Webb on the 5th day of the 4th month, 1683. In those records the family name is spelled “Dixson”. Herbert Standing in his work “Delaware Quaker Record: New Castle County”, states that Henry and Rose were members of the Lurgan Meeting in Armagh. Lurgan is located east of Portadown, a few miles northeast of Drumlisnegrilly. Lurgan was the site for the establishment of the first Quaker meeting in Ireland in 1654, initiated by the well know Quaker William Edmondson, the acknowledged pioneer of Irish Quakerism. He gathered a few like-minded individuals to worship in his house. Five miles to the west regular meetings were first held later in the same year in the home of Margery Atkinson near the ancient church of Kilmore. Soon after a permanent meeting was formed in the townland of Ballyhagan. Ulster was largely settled by immigrants from Northern England and the Scottish borders region. Research has shown that the bulk of the settlers were from the Scottish lowlands. Various researchers have supposed that Henry was a descendant of the Scottish Clan Dixson, a lowland Clan originally centered near Berwick in Scotland. In fact, it seems likely that Henry and Rose were instead from the North of England though. The town of Lurgan owes its existence and much of its success to the Brownlow family. During the plantation of Ulster by James I, John Brownlow of Nottingham England offered himself as an undertaker of lands in O'Neilland, stating that he was worth £150 per annum and that he wanted 2,000 acres. He was granted the middle proportion of Doughcarron containing 1,500 acres at a total rent of £8 to hold forever on May 29th 1610. His son William was also granted 1,000 acres in the Manor of Ballynamoney on June 18th, 1610. This portion lay on the southern shore of Lough Neagh, stretching from the upper Bann eastward to Doughcarron and southward to John Machett's part of Kerhonan. By 1611, the Brownlows were residing in the district and started to build two bawns having brought six carpenters, one mason, a tailor and workmen. In 1619, a fair town had arisen on Doughcarron consisting of forty two houses, with paved streets, two water-mills, and a windmill. John Brownlow died about 1616 and his son William was re-granted the lands at Ballynamoney and Doughcarron by letters patent under Seal of Charles II to form Manor of Brownlows Derry on June 29th 1629. In this grant is found the first mention of the name Lurgan. It states that Sir William Brownlow was empowered to hold a weekly market on Friday and two annual fairs in “Lurganballyvacken, alias Ballylurgan”. When he came of age in 1660 William’s grandson Arthur Chamberlain, assumed the name of Brownlow and inherited his grandfather's estate. Under his supervision Lurgan began to grow and prosper. Building was encouraged by giving tenants renewable leases and stipulating that one or more houses of 20 to 30 feet in length, 18 to 20 feet high were to be erected on the front of their own tenements. From this stipulation Lurgan began to grow and to take the shape which its main street retains today. Arthur took a deep interest in the welfare of his tenants by introducing linen weaving to them and buying their produce at a loss to himself. Thus he laid the foundation of the linen industry in this district and by 1675 there was a market house established around which linen was sold. In 1708, Lurgan was described by Thomas Molyneux as a town which has the greatest mart of Linen Manufacture in the North, being almost entirely peopled by linen weavers. The majority were immigrants from the North of England and they brought with them skills that were valued by the ambitious and enterprising landlord, Arthur Chamberlain Brownlow. He readily accepted as tenants weavers and tanners who were likely to develop the economic potential of his lands. Many lived in the area between Portadown and Lurgan in the parish of Seagoe. In his 1708 Will, our ancestor William Dixon styled himself a “Weaver” so it seems likely that his father Henry Dixon before him at Lurgan Ireland was a weaver as well. Crawford’s 2005 volume “The Impact of the Domestic Linen Industry in Ulster” states: “Genealogical evidence can establish that the weaving industry was established in Lisburn and Lurgan by men from the north of England who flocked into Ulster in the decades following the troubles of the 1640’s. The most reliable genealogical records for the indentification of their origins are the 17th century Quaker family records which apparently only survive for Lurgan and Ballyhagen meetings but not for Lisburn. The Lurgan records note the origins of twenty families who emigrated to Ulster: one is from Scotland; nine from Yorkshire; four from Cumberland; two from Lancashire; two from Northumberland; and one each from Westmorland and Durham.”

Records from 1664 show a hearth tax roll described as “The returne of all fire hearths and stones in the County of Ardmagh as the same was made and returned at the general sessions of the peace holden at Armagh for the County aforesaid the 10th day of January 1664 before Sr. George Aheson, Sir Toby Points Knt., William Draper Esq. and other his maties Justices of the Peace of said County”. In the parish of Seagoe, in Drumlisnegrilly Townland it lists Henry Dixon, with one hearth assessed at 2 shillings. A “townland” was a smaller unit of a parish, and Drumlisnegrilly comprised about 68 acres, lying about two and a quarter miles southeast of the town of Portadown. Henry and Rose are known from colonial Quaker records to have been the parents of at least three children; a son William, and daughters Dinah and Rose. Records from the Quaker Meeting at Lurgan record: “At our particular mens meeting att Thomas Calvarts the 29th of 10th Mo 1676. Thomas Calvart and Thomas Atkinson is desired to speake to James Harrison ye elder, about his disorderly walking. William Mathews and Vallentine Hollingsworth is desired to speake to Henry Dixson and Robart Thornbrough, conserning their walking disorderly. Done. The phrase "disorderly walking" dates back to some of the earliest Quakers writing of the late 1600's. The concept is that a true member of the Society of Friends walks a path throughout their lives whose proper bounds are prescribed by the Discipline. If they follow this path they remain a member in good standing. The phrase "disorderly walking" implies straying from the path required by Discipline and places the member in imminent danger of disownment. Henry’s son William came to America in 1676, and Henry and Rose are claimed by most researchers to have then followed his lead around the year 1688. No direct evidence of their presence here is known, but Volume 5 of “The Literary Era” (1898), and Alpheus Harlan’s “History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family “ (1914) both claim that Henry was an innkeeper in New Castle County Delaware. At that time the state of Delaware was a part of William Penn’s Quaker colony, and was called the southern counties. In his unpublished manuscript “The Old Stamping Grounds” on the early Dixon family, Ben F. Dixon states, without listing any authority, that Rose Dixon came to the colonies as a widow in the company of her children. The date of Henry and Rose’s deaths are unknown. No estate proceedings have been found for them, but they are known from Quaker marriage records at Kennett Meeting to have been the parents of Dinah Dixon and Rose Dixon. In the 1708 will of their son William, he identifies the husband of Dinah, Michael Harlan, as his brother, and the husband of Rose, Thomas Pierson, was a witness to the will.



Lead

http://www.chichesterquakers.org.uk/A_History_of_Chichester_Quakers.html : A History of Chichester Quakers: The Quakers in Chichester 1655 - 1967, by Michael Woolley (Fourth Edition)

Published by: The Religious Society of Friends, Chichester Meeting. Copyright Michael Woolley 1998, 1999, 2000, 2006

preface... from Arundel into Chichester (England assumed)...

Then in 1683 came the Rye House Plot and the road suddenly became much more difficult. Some prominent Whigs were uncovered in a plot to assassinate the King, and in the hiatus which followed the Tories were in the ascendant, and determined to control any potential trouble-makers. A great new wave of religious persecution swept the country. In Chichester this was to reach a climax in July and then to continue unabated till October. ...
It was too much for Margery Wilkinson who went off and complained first to the Bishop's Chancellor, (a senior legal officer) and then to the magistrates. She got short shrift from them. They told her that Friends were meeting illegally and nothing could be done. The attendant constable gave an old fashioned warning about the law taking its full course if any more were heard. It seems that she ignored the warning and did complain again for shortly after her name appears in the list of those imprisoned in Horsham Gaol. She was soon released - but in the case of Henry Dixon events took a terrible course: he too was sent to prison by the Chichester court and he died there three months later. The oppression was not to last much longer though: in 1685 King Charles died, James II came to the throne, and the political atmosphere changed for the better.

Sources

  1. Source: #S-2119255563 Page: Source number: 8810.225; Source type: Family group sheet, FGSE, listed as parents; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: . Note: http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=sse&db=worldmarr_ga&h=343232&ti=0&indiv=try Note: http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=worldmarr_ga&h=343232&ti=0&indiv=try Data: Text: Name: Henry Dixon Birth Date: 1633 Birth Place: Ir APID: 1,7836::343232
  2. Source: #S255 Text: Online publication - Ancestry.com. OneWorldTree [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc.
  3. Source: #S387 Page: Tree #1740 Text: Date of Import: Mar 1, 1998
  4. Source: #S51 Page: Ancestry Family Trees Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6676093&pid=-1250178018
  5. Source: #S355 Page: Source number: 8810.225; Source type: Family group sheet, FGSE, listed as parents; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: . Text: Birth date: 1633Birth place: IrMarriage date: Marriage place: of DE
  6. Source: #S255 Text: Online publication - Ancestry.com. OneWorldTree [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc. http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=6676093&pid=-1250178018
  7. Source: #S255 Text: Online publication - Ancestry.com. OneWorldTree [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc.
  8. Source: #S355 Page: Source number: 8810.225; Source type: Family group sheet, FGSE, listed as parents; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: . Text: Birth date: 1633Birth place: IrMarriage date: Marriage place: of DE
  9. Source: #S386 Page: Tree #5442 Text: Date of Import: Mar 1, 1998
  10. Source: #S255 Text: Online publication - Ancestry.com. OneWorldTree [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc.
  11. Source: #S387 Page: Tree #1740 Text: Date of Import: Mar 1, 1998
  12. Source: #S255 Text: Online publication - Ancestry.com. OneWorldTree [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc.
  13. 1633 per Weaver.ged; 1630 per the Dixon-1137 profile merged into Dixon-347 on August 12, 2012
  14. 14.0 14.1 The WikiTree profile Dixon-3253 for Henry Dixon (1630-1687, Ireland, father of Rosie Dixon) was created by Ty Gorsegner through the import of Jack Hayton Tree-John Franklin Hayton.ged on Nov 12, 2013.
  15. Quakers in Delaware in the Time of William Penn (http://nc-chap.org/church/quaker/standingDH3crop.pdf)
  16. this is an assumption by most researchers; the actual marriage record does not specify that witnesses Henry and Rose were his parents
  17. Harlan Genealogy, by Alpheus Harlan
Note: Although the attached article (Gregg-Dixon-Houghton, of Newcastle County, Delaware) states that Henry Dix(s)on was "an innkeeper at New Castle, Delaware," Quakers in Delaware in the Time of William Penn states:
There was a tradition that Henry Dixon became an innkeeper at New Castle, but it is difficult to find any records substantiating the fact that either the father or the mother came to Delaware.
  • Source S216
Title: LDS Website www.familysearch.org
  • Source S255
Author: Ancestry.com
Title: One World Tree (sm)
Publication: Name: Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., n.d.;
Repository: #R1
NOTESource Medium: Ancestry.com
Repository R1
Name: www.ancestry.com
Address:
E-Mail Address:
Phone Number:
  • Source S355
Author: Yates Publishing
Title: U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
Publication: Name: Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004;
Repository: #R1
NOTESource Medium: Ancestry.com
  • Source S386
Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc.
Title: World Family Tree Vol. 2, Ed. 1
Publication: Name: Release date: November 29, 1995;
NOTECustomer pedigree.
Family Archive CD
  • Source S387
Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc.
Title: World Family Tree Vol. 3, Ed. 1
Publication: Name: Release date: February 9, 1996;
NOTECustomer pedigree.
Family Archive CD
  • Source S51
Title: Ancestry Family Trees
Publication: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.;
NOTEThis information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created.
  • Source: S-1855645572 Repository: #R-1855645573 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Page: Ancestry Family Trees Note: Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=30777202&pid=471
  • Repository: R-1855645573 Name: Ancestry.com Address: http://www.Ancestry.com Note:
  • Source: S-2119255563 Repository: #R-2145629753 Title: U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Author: Yates Publishing Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.Original data - This unique collection of records was extracted from a variety of sources including family group sheets and electronic databases. Originally, the information was deriv Note: APID: 1,7836::0
  • Repository: R-2145629753 Name: Ancestry.com Address: http://www.Ancestry.com Note:
  • History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family and particularly of the descendants of George and Michael Harlan who settled in Chester County, Pa., 1687. Retrieved from {http://www.harlanfamily.org/alph.htm] and quoted from Genealogy of the Harlan family, by Alpheus Harlan.
  • S-1855645572: Ancestry Family Trees (Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members), citation for WikiTree profile Dickson-399 created through the import of AustinMoserJohnsonStover Tree.ged on Oct 16, 2011 by Ken Austin. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Ken and others.

Dixon-347

This person (Dixon-347) was created through the import of Weaver.ged on 03 January 2011 by Robert Weaver. The following data was included in the gedcom.

Dixon-718

The WikiTree profile Dixon-718 was created through the import of heinakuu2011-6.ged on July 5, 2011 by Johanna Amnelin. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Johanna and others. Johanna included the following in that profile:

Note NI1023!SOURCES: 1. Gen. of Harlen Family 1687-1912 p. 8
2. Charles Marshall's Papers Gen. data Vol 1 p. 11, 119

Dixon-1137

WikiTree profile Dixon-1137 created through the import of DIXON.GED on Oct 11, 2011 by Glenn Dixon. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Glenn and others. Notes included by Glenn in the Dixon-1137 profile:

This marriage is not one that is sourced. To be more specific, the relationship between Henry Dixon and his son and two daughters is un-sourced. The meeting minutes from Lurgan mentions a marriage where William Dixon marries Isabela Rea, and Henry and Rose Dixon are in attendance.
The William Dixon in Delaware is married to Ann Gregg.
The connection between William in Delaware and William in Ireland is, as far as I can tell, pure conjecture, even in the earliest books which discuss it.

Dixon-1318

The WikiTree profile Dixon-1318 was created through the import of AustinMoserJohnsonStover Tree.ged on October 16, 2011 by Ken Austin and merged with Dixon-1137 July 20, 2012. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Ken and others. Ken included the following details in Dixon-1318:

Dixon-1955

The WikiTree profile Dixon-1955 was created through the import of Thompson Family Tree.ged on September 1, 2012 by Wilson Thompson. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Wilson and others. Following was included in that gedcom.

Henry Dixon 1633–1667 • KND9-55R​ Rose 1637–1671 • L71G-H3J​ Marriage: 1655 Ireland

Children (6) Harlan Dixon 1656–Deceased • 93BR-2DS​


Dinah Dixon 1657–1735 • L7LR-BJZ​

Michael Dixon 1658–Deceased • 93BR-2DG​

Rachel Dixon 1660–1709 • LK6R-21F​

Rose Dixon 1661–1722 • 278T-BSB​

William Dixon 1662–1708 • KNC3-RJG​

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No known carriers of Henry's Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA have taken yDNA or mtDNA tests.

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Images: 1
The Era Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly, Volume 5, Issue 11, pg 331
The Era Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly, Volume 5, Issue 11, pg 331

Collaboration

On 25 Nov 2017 at 20:39 GMT Glenn Dixon wrote:

This bio page seems quite long. Would it be appropriate to move the bulk of it to a freespace page and then link back to it from here?

On 26 Aug 2016 at 06:13 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

Dixon-347 and Dixon-1956 appear to represent the same person because: Hi! This is the Unknown Dixon profile that had been attached as the father of Henry Dixon's wife. It needs to be merged away, and I thought merging him with Henry would be appropriate. Please complete the merge. Thanks!

On 14 Aug 2016 at 09:22 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

update: merge completed

Dixon-3253 and Dixon-347 appear to represent the same person because: I don't recall why I had postponed these. I don't see why they can't be merged. Let me know if I missed something, otherwise, please merge. Thanks!

On 14 Aug 2016 at 08:27 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

hmmm. I thought we had found somewhere that Henry's mother had also been named Rose,* but I can't find it now.

* Rose Dixon was detached as his mother, but she's still of an age to be his mother, and attached as wife of James, who's attached as his father (don't see the source for that either). I thought I remembered that we'd found something that said Henry's mother was also named Rose (although maybe not Rose Dixon ) ... but my memory has never been good and isn't improving with age!

On 17 Nov 2014 at 06:21 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

I think that the death information in Dixon-347's datafields are incorrect, which is discussed in the text. A death date of before 1688 (discussed in text) matches text of Dixon-3253, which says that Henry died in jail (between 1683 and 1685).

On 25 Sep 2014 at 14:51 GMT Esmé (Pieterse) van der Westhuizen wrote:

Dixon-3253 and Dixon-347 are not ready to be merged because: More research needed on dates and family

On 19 Aug 2012 at 14:57 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:



Henry is 17 degrees from Judy Garland, 18 degrees from Mindy Silva and 16 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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