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Ralph Dixon (1785 - 1854)

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Ralph Dixon
Born in Newcastle Upon Tyne,,Northumberland,Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Dublin,,,map
Descendants descendants
Died in Staindrop,,Durham,Englandmap
Profile last modified | Created 30 Apr 2014
This page has been accessed 512 times.

Categories: Quakers | English Quakers | Durham Quakers | Raby Monthly Meeting, Durham.

Quakers
Ralph Dixon was a Quaker.
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Contents

Biography


This biography was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import.[1]

Ralph Dixon enlisted at a period in his life when “the war with France was very hot,” as he says himself. He volunteered into the 31st regiment of foot for active service. At the battle of Talavera he was shot through the shoulder, another bullet through his hand, his cap shot off, and another bullet through his haversack. He was, after an extraordinary recovery from a mortified shoulder in Lisbon Hospital, invalided home and discharged as an out-pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, and returned with his wife and son (presumably George senior) to his native village to suffer from repeated hemorrhage (sic) from his lungs. He joined the Methodists, but disliked the ostentatious display of religious experiences in class meetings, and he turned to the Society of Friends, and said, “This people shall be my people, and their God my God.” He could not, he felt, swear to his pension half-yearly before a Justice of the Peace. The first time he affirmed, but the pension burdened his mind. “Friends were very tender over me, seldom mentioning it.” Appearing before an Exciseman with his hat on as a Quaker, the Exciseman was about to take the hat off, when another officer said, “Let him alone; he is a Quaker.” The Exciseman said, “If he is, what business has he with a pension” and this rebuke he felt keenly, and soon some words from Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse, at a meeting he attended, made him feel his inconsistency, so he wrote in 1830 to the Duke of Wellington: “To the Duke of Wellington, Respected Friend,” recounted his service and wounds, and then proceeded, “But having been long convinced that all war is anti-Christian, I have felt at times uneasy under the persuasion that the receiving of a pension wax inconsistent with that belief, besides being a burden to the public in these times of distress.” He then returns thanks for it, and goes on, “Next to the Divine Providence, my thanks are due to thee, O Duke, for the great care that was taken of the sick and wounded in the Peninsula, otherwise my life could not have been preserved; a grateful remembrance of which, with the foregoing reason, is the cause of my taking the great liberty of troubling thee with this letter. Desiring thy present and everlasting welfare, “I remain, “Thy friend, “RALPH DIXON.“Staindrop, “6th mo. 27th, 1830.” [2]

Name

Name: Ralph /Dixon (1st)/
Given Name: Ralph
Surname: Dixon (1st)

Birth

Birth:
Date: 3/11/1785
Place: Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland,England

Death

Death:
Date: 30/03/1854
Place: Staindrop,,Durham,England

Baptism

Baptism:
Date: 3/04/1785
Place: Newcastle Upon Tyne,,Northumberland,England

Marriage

Marriage:
Date: 29/07/1808
Place: Dublin,,,
Data Changed:
Date: 25 May 2013
Time: 09:10:31
Husband: Ralph Dixon
Wife: Ann Booth
Child: George Dixon

Sources

  • Information: Ancestry.com. England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013. Original data: General Register Office: Society of Friends' Registers, Notes and Certificates of Births, Marriages and Burials. Records of the General Register Office, Government Social Survey Department, and Office of Population Censuses and Surveys, RG 6. The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, England.
  • 1851 England Census Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Re Data Changed: Date: 12 Dec 2013 Time: 22:39:42 CREA Date: 12 Dec 2013 Time: 17:13:00 Quality or Certainty of Data: 1 Page: Class: HO107; Piece: 2387; Folio: 63; Page: 9; GSU roll: 87065.
  • England & Wales Christening Records, 1530-1906 Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.Original data - Genealogical Society of Utah. British Isles Vital Records Index, 2nd Edition. Salt Lake City, Utah: Intellectua Data Changed: Date: 01 Apr 2013 Time: 17:13:08 CREA Date: 01 Apr 2013 Time: 17:13:00 Quality or Certainty of Data: 1
  1. Dixon-3742 was created by Steven Ringer through the import of Ancestors of Gulielma Clark & Walter John Ringer.ged on Apr 16, 2014. .
  2. Great Ayton family Histories, The Dixon Family


Notes

Reference Number: MH:I1885
Ralph Dixon (1785-1854)
George Dixon, first superintendent of the Friends School, was the son of Ralph Dixon of Staindrop. In The Diariesof Edward Pease (Headley Brothers, London 1907) there is an entry for Thursday 21 March 1850:;Went with W Matthews to Staindrop meetingwhere he had good service, dining at Ralph Dixon’s. It was interesting to be with W.M. and R.D., two Friends who from being soldiers with carnal weapons had laid these down and become clad with the armour of Christ and with weapons not carnal but mighty to the pulling down of strongholds of Satan.” There is a footnote about Ralph Dixon:There is little doubt that this Ralph Dixon of Staindrop is one of the Dixons of that place and Raby, and therefore related to the ancestors of the very numerous Quaker family of this name, from which sprung the Engineer Dixons, and Sir Raylton and his brother Mr Waynman Dixon families. The Ralph Dixon alluded to by Edward Pease had an extraordinary career: not a highly moral character in his native village, heenlisted at a period in his life when the war withFrance was very hot, as he says himself. He volunteered into the 31st regiment of foot for active service. At the battle of Talavera he was shot through the shoulder, another bullet through his hand, his cap shot off, and another bullet through his haversack. He was, after an extraordinary recovery from a mortified shoulder in Lisbon Hospital, invalided home and discharged as an out-pensioner of Chelsea Hospital, and returned with his wife and son (presumably George senior) to his native village to suffer from repeated hemorrhage (sic) from his lungs. He joined the Methodists, but disliked the ostentatious display of religious experiences in class meetings, and he turned to the Society of Friends, and said, This people shall be my people, and their God my God; He could not, he felt, swear to his pension half-yearly before a Justice of the Peace. The first time he affirmed, but the pension burdened his mind. Friends were very tender over me, seldom mentioning it. Appearing before an Exciseman with his hat on as a Quaker, the Exciseman was about to take the hat off, when another officer said, Let him alone; he is a Quaker.The Exciseman said, ;If he is, what business has he with a pension and this rebuke he felt keenly, and soon some words from Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse, at a meeting he attended, made himfeel his inconsistency, so he wrote in 1830 to the Duke of Wellington: To the Duke of Wellington, Respected Friend,” recounted his serviceand wounds, and then proceeded, But having been long convinced that all war is anti-Christian, I have felt at times uneasy under the persuasion that the receiving of a pension wax inconsistent with that belief, besides being a burden to thepublic in these times of distress.He then returns thanks for it, and goes on, Next to the Divine Providence, my thanks are due to thee, O Duke, for the great care that was taken of thesick and wounded in the Peninsula, otherwise my life could not have been preserved; agrateful remembrance of which, with the foregoing reason, is the cause of my taking the great liberty of troublingthee with this letter. Desiring thy present and everlasting welfare, I remain, Thy friend, RALPH DIXON.;Staindrop, 6th mo. 27th, 1830.To which he got areply saying that so long as he thought proper to discontinue transmitting the usual affidavits, no pension could be issued, but in consideration of his wife and family, their lordships (Lords Commissioners of the Hospital) desired, in the event of an application at a future period, the same was to be paid as heretofore. His life after this was not without troubles, but in peace of mind, and in good service to the Society, he lived out his days and was among Friends numbered as one of those whohad come out of much tribulation and had their robes washed and made white.This Ralph Dixon, born 1785, died 1854, was the son of George Dixon, a Quaker (but disowned for marrying out), of Staindrop, and his wife Mary, daughter of Ralph Bowron. His (R D’s) son, George Dixon , of Great Ayton (born 1812, died 1904) was a great Temperance advocate, and this George Dixon was the father of Ralph Dixon (living 1907), who was for thirty years the Superintendent of Ayton Friends School.


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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Ralph by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Ralph:

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Collaboration

Ralph is 20 degrees from SJ Baty, 28 degrees from Orville Redenbacher and 17 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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