Edward Dorsey Sr

Edward Dorsey Sr (abt. 1619 - bef. 1659)

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Edward Dorsey Sr [uncertain]
Born about in Hertfordshire, Englandmap
Son of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married about 1638 in Virginiamap [uncertain]
Descendants descendants
Died before in Kent Island Parish, Queen Anne's, Marylandmap
Profile last modified 2 Feb 2019 | Created 30 Dec 2010
This page has been accessed 6,970 times.
The Birth and Marriage Dates are a rough estimate. See the text for details.

Contents

Edward Dorsey Origins

The Legend of English Origins

Harry Wright Newman believed that "prior to the conquest of England by the Normans, an ancient and noble family of D'Orsai or D'Orsay had its seat near Cleves in Flanders. It is believed that several of its members accompanied William the Conqueror to England in 1066, and ultimately settled in County Essex....there is today a small town on the coast of Essex called D'Arcy, and it is also said that numerous D'Arcys once lived in that vicinity. In County Middlesex ...is a town and parish of Hockley-Hole, the peculiar name given to the Dorsey estate in Maryland. [1]

Caroline Kemper Bulkley [2] has done extensive research into the parentage of Edward Dorsey, Immigrant, and found no connections.

DNA Research Suggests Irish Origins

Edward DORSEY was claimed by some as being descended from Sir Norman D'Arcie cousin of William the Conqueror, and from the Lord D'Arcy family of Hornby Castle. [3] DNA evidence has proven that theory to be incorrect, showing that Edward DORSEY is not related to those families. [4] The latest DNA results [November 2005, updated March 2006] would indicate a likely Irish origin for Edward Dorsey.15[5]

The Y-DNA haplotype of known descendants of Edward Dorsey is R1b1; the Y-DNA haplotype of known descendants of the Anglo-Norman Darcys is E1b1b1. This renders the supposed descent of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant to Virginia, from the Anglo-Norman Darcy family impossible. [6]

The conclusions of DNA research are that:

  • Edward Dorsey of Maryland was not related to the Anglo-Norman Darcy family;
  • his father was not Edward Darcy.
  • His parentage is unknown, his origins, however, are ultimately Irish, and the Y-DNA results of descendants can be seen at the Dorsey DNA site. [6] The Y-DNA haplotype does NOT match descendants of the D'Arcys who came with William the Conqueror.
  • He is not at all likely to have any sort of connection to any members of the peerage or even the gentry.
  • He named his plantation "Hockley in the Hole"; Hockley-in-the-Hole was a London slum on the banks of the Fleet ditch (an open sewer) famous for bear-baiting and other low amusements, and certainly not something that someone from a gentry family would think of to name a plantation after. [7]

Also see https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/dorsey-dna/about/results

Date Estimation

No recorded dates have been found for Edward Dorsey's birth or marriage or the births of his children. Two documents appear to be key in estimating these dates.

First, in 1664 the three sons of Edward patent the property their father had once had surveyed. To do this without a guardian, they had to be 21 years of age. It is reasonable that they undertook this as soon as the youngest was 21. Therefore:

  • John, age 21, b. 1643
  • Joshua, age 23, b. 1641
  • Edward, age 25, b. 1639.

Secondly, in 1659, a few months before their father's death, neighbor Thomas Gates requests in his will that his heirs give the children of Edward Darcy free outlet to the woods and springs as he had given them. One must presume the Dorsey boys to be minors at the time, and with the estimated dates above, they are: Edward 20, Joshua 18, and John 16.

Edward's Marriage: If the oldest child was born in 1639, estimate the marriage to have taken place in 1638. However, it is in 1642 that Cornelius Lloyd receives land for transporting Edward to Virginia. One may assume that the actual transport was a year or two earlier than the patent was recorded. Still the presumption is that Edward was single at the time he was transported. One record shows and Edward Dorsey present in Virginia in 1636. If Edward actually arrived in 1635 and was 18 at the time, he would have been 21 in 1638.

Edward's Birth: If he was 18 in 1635, then his estimated birth year would be 1617, and he would have been 42 when he died by drowning in 1659.

Edward Dorsey in Virginia

Names

Edward Darcy, Edward d'Arcy, Edward D'Arcy
Edward Dorsey, Edward Dorsey Sr, Edward Dorsey I
Edward Dorsey, Immigrant
Edward Dorsey, Boatwright [8]

Various spellings of the name continue to appear on the records in Maryland, but the original signature of the sons of the immigrant, show the family spelling the name Dorsey. [9]

1635 Estimated Year of Immigration

An Edward Dorsey is known to be in Lower Norfolk County in 1636, therefore estimate Edward's immigration to be the prior year, and that he was 18 at the time.

1638 Marriage to Ann

Edward DORSEY was married to Ann, [10] her surname being unknown. [5]

Estimating from the necessary ages of his sons in 1666, Edward married Ann in 1638. The place of marriage is most likely to have been Virginia. Her surname is unknown, but it is most likely she was born in England or Ireland.

Some researchers have inaccurately listed her as Ann, daughter of Matthew Howard, Sr. While Matthew HOWARD did have a daughter named Ann, there is record of her husband being James Greneffe. [11]

Since Edward DORSEY's daughter Sarah married Matthew Howard, Jr., son of the previously mentioned Matthew HOWARD. If Edward DORSEY's wife were the daughter of Matthew HOWARD, that would mean that his daughter Sarah's marriage to Matthew HOWARD, Jr. would have been to her blood uncle, a relation that was strictly forbidden, then as now.[5]

A possibility for the surname of Ann, wife of Edward DORSEY, is that suggested by Jay Worrall, Jr. He suggested she may have been the daughter of Humphrey BACHE of London, and the aunt of Elizabeth HARRIS, of Quaker fame.[5]

1642 Transported by Cornelius Lloyd

On December 15, 1642, Cornelius Lloyd received a grant of land for bringing 60 persons into the colony. Among the list of names was that of Edw: -orsey, the first letter of the last name being obliterated... [9]

1642 Cattle Purchase in Lower Norfolk County

... John Browne of Elizabeth River in the County of Lower Norff, planter, had on the 11th of February, 1642[12] sold unto Edward Dorsey of the county aforesaid planter three head of Cattle (Vizt) one Cowe aged about seaven yeares of a brinded Coulor and marked with a Cropp on the right Eare and the left Eare whole... [9]

1645 Lower Norfolk County Court

This article typed as written: "At a County Court held on November 3, 1645, at the house of William Shipp, it was recorded that John Browne of Elizabeth River in the county of Lower Norffe, planter, had on the 11th of February 1642, sold unto Edward Dorsey of the county aforesaid, planter, three head of cattle (vizt) one cowe aged about seaven yeares of brinded coulor and marked with a cropp on the right eare and the left eare whole, and a steare of a coulor as aforesaid aged about one yeare and halfe and marked with a cropp on the left eare and the right eare slitt allsoe one heifer calfe brinded as aforesaid aged about three querters of a yeare and marked with a cropp on both eares and a slitt in one and doe by these presents give grant bargaine and sell unto the said Edward Darsey his heirs execut'rs administrators and assignes for every for a valuable consideration pt in hand paid." (Dated the 11th of February 1642. [13]

The County court held at the house of William Shipp on December 15, 1645, ordered Thomas Todd to pay Edward Darcy and Thomas Hall forty pounds of Tobacco a piece for their tyme and charge in attendance of the Court for two days, and on December 10, 1649, when Edward Dorsey witnessed a quit-claim deed executed by Thomas Tod, his signature was Edward E'D: Dorsy. [14]

1645 Paid for Attendance at Court

The County Court held at the house of William Shipp on December 15, 1645, ordered Thomas Todd to pay Edward Darcy and Thomas Hall forty pounds of tobacco a piece for theire tyme and charge in attendance of the Court for two days...[9]

1646 Thomas Brown Assigned Land

On October 7, 1646, Thomas Brown was given 240 acres in Lower Norfolk County due by the assignment of the rights of 5 persons transported by Cornelius Lloyd - among them Edward Dorsey.[9]

Transition from Virginia to Maryland

Edward Dorsey ".. lived several years in Virginia before he came to Anne Arundel County in 1650. Various spellings of his name appear in the deeds and land patents of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, between the years 1642 and 1648." [9]

By the year 1648, freedom of worship in Virginia had been prohibited and life there became less attractive. As a result, many settlers turned to the newly erected county of Anne Arundel in Maryland, where alluring inducements to obtain land were being offered, and where freedom of worship was said to be guaranteed. Among those who went, were Edward Dorsey, John Norwood, Matthew Howard, Thomas Todd and Nicholas Wyatt...[9]

On October 31, 1649, William Julian of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia sold to Robert Taylor of Elizabeth River 200 acres of land being a neck of land upon the south turning of the said river, east upon a creek, and south upon a creek and north into the woods. This deed was endorsed on the back as follows: "Mem. I Robert Tayler doe make sale of a neck of Land cont. about 200 acres within mentioned unto Edward Dorcey for him and his heires to Injoy with all Rights and prieviledges As Wittnes my hand this 20th of Octob A.o 1648." [15]

A land warrant was issued in 1650 to Edward DORSEY of 200 acres, and also 200 acres more that were part of a warrant for 400 acres granted to John NORWOOD and Edward DORSEY in 1651. Warrant was the xith of November MDCL Granted to Edward DORSEY of the County of Ann Arundell County for two hundred acres of Land the which heas signds away as followeth, as also two hundred acres more part of a warrnat for four hundred acres, granted John NORWOOD and the said DORSEY dated the xxiiii of February MDCLi.[5]

"Nicholas Wyatt surveyed "Wyatt's Harbor" and "Wyatts' Hills," upon which "Belvoir" now stands, just south of, and in sight of Round Bay. Adjoining it was Thomas Gates, upon "Dorsey's Creek," near "Dorsey", taken up by the first Edward Dorsey in partnership with Captain John Norwood." [16]

Most of these men, however, maintained a close association with Virginia, and on November 15, 1652, Edward Dorsey and four others who had gone to Maryland, returned to Virginia, where Francis Fleetwood received a grant of land for their transportation...[9]

Edward Dorsey in Maryland

1655 Neighbor of John Norwood

Sometimes before 1655, Edward Darcy in partnership with Thomas Manning bought from Thomas Marsh of the county of Ann Arundell, merchant, a tract of 600 acres lying on the west side of Chesapeake Bay, bounded on the north by land of John Norwood and on west by the said bay, for which no patent was issued until 1661. [17]

To the west and north across Darcy's Creek, which no doubt bears the name of the immigrant, were the tracts taken up by Edward Dorsey and Capt. John Norwood with the land of Nicholas Wyatt lying between. [18]

Farther up the Severn River near Marshes Creek, later called Hockley Creek, was the land taken up by Matthew Howard. Adjoining this land on the south was the tract called Wyatt, laid out for Nicholas Wyatt. Nearby these two tracts was Hockley in the Hole, taken up by Edward Dorsey and later patented by his three sons, Edward, Joshua and John Dorsey.[18]

In the Land Office of Annapolis, may be seen the following warrant, which explains itself: "Warrant MDCL, granted to Edward Dorsey, of Anne Arundel Co., for 200 acres of land, which he assigns as followeth; as also 200 acres more, part of a warrant for 400 acres, granted John Norwood and the said Dorsey, dated XXIII of Feb., MDCLI. Know all men by these presents that I, Edward Dorsey, of the County of Anne Arundel, boatwright, have granted, bargained and sold, for a valuable consideration, already received, all my right, title, interest of and in a warrant for 200 acres, bearing date 1650, and also 200 acres more, being half of a warrant of 400 acres—the one half belonging to Captain Norwood, bearing date, 1651, both of which assigned to George Yate. EDWARD DORSEY, Sealed." Signed in the presence of Cornelius Howard, John Howard, Oct. 22nd, MDCLXVII, (1667).[18]

1659 Thomas Gates Will

Thomas Gates, in his will dated May 2, 1659, requests that his heirs give to the children of Edward Darcy free outlet to the woods and springs as he had given them. "This signifies that the children or some of them were old enough then to avail themselves of the privilege."[19]

1659 Death By Drowning

Edward Dorsey, Boatwright, died August 2, 1659 in Kent County (Present Queen Anne's County), Province of Maryland. Cause of death: Drowned while traveling by ship to the island.

Edward Dorsey, Boatwright, drowned near the Isle of Kent in the Chesapeake Bay sometime prior to 2 Aug 1659 when Thomas Hinson petitioned the court for related expenses.

"Petition in court Anne Arundel 2 Aug. 1659, one Thomas Hinson petitioned for compensation for having taken up the boate wherein Edward Darcy and some otheres were drowned neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the said Darcy Overseer to take up the same which he did deliuery the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority..."

So unsure if the Edward mentioned above may be his son. from Prov. Ct. Rec. S.I. f.282 "Att a Court hoden in Anarundel County on Tuesday August 2nd 1659: Whereas Thomas Hinson hath petitioned this Court, Showing that hee hauing taken up the Boate wherein Edward Doarcy & some others drowned, neare the Isle of Kent, being desyred by the sd Darcys overseer to take up the same, wch he did, delivering the same Boate to the chiefe in Authority taking a discharge upon the Anarundell & now by his Petn craving for his paynes taking therein, as the Court now sitting shall adjudege him. It is ordered that the sd. Thomas Hinson have one hundd pounds of Tob. payd him for the sd paynes and Care, by those (Whoever they bee) that possesse & enjoy the sd Boate" [20]

Transactions After His Death

1664 Hockley-in-the-Hole

"In 1664, the three sons of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant of 1650...took up and patented their father's survey of "Hockley-in-the-Hole." They were Colonel Edward Dorsey, Joshua, and Hon. John Dorsey, prominent leaders in political movements, and representatives in legislative measures.[21]

Hockley-in-the-Hole, originally taken up by Edward Darcy, was in 1664 patented to his sons Edward, John and Joshua, the original patent bearing date 20 August 1664, being still in the possession of the present owner of Hockley, Miss Anne Elizabeth Dorsey, lineal descendant of all three of the original patentees. In the year 1681, "Edward Dorsey, Gent. Of Anne Arundell County, Son and heir of Edward Dorsey, late of said County deceased" assigned his right to his brother John. The parchment document granting Hockley to the three Dorsey brothers bears the autograph of Charles, third Lord Baltimore, and was given under the Great Seal of the Province.[18]

Presuming that the three sons must have achieved majority to take up this survey, the assumption is made that the youngest had just become 21 in 1664.

1664 Long Reach Plantation

On August 20, 1664, Lord Baltimore granted the Dorsey brothers (John, Joshua, and Edward) a 400 acre plantation on the Cabin Neck Branch west of the Severn River in Anne Arundel County.

On November 10, 1695, Edward patented a 448 acre plantation on the county’s frontier, which later became part of Howard County, and today is Long Reach, the name of the original land grant.

At his death in 1704 or 1705, Edward Dorsey divided Long Reach among three of his sons – Nicholas, Benjamin, and John. Dorsey descendants have been Howard Countians ever since, but the Long Reach lands passed from the Dorseys to other families. [22]

1667 Land Transfers

These lands were in the year 1667 assigned to George Yate, Edward Darcy having in 1661 been granted a valuable estate in that part of St. Mary's County which in 1663 became a part of the newly erected County of Calvert. This was Theobush Manning, patented to Edward Darcy and Thomas Manning on 6 April 1661, as shown in the Land Warrants, but incorrectly entered in Lord Baltimore's Rent Rolls for Calvert County as belonging to "Edward Darby". This land was on the east side of the Chesapeake Bay next to John Norwood's land and contained 600 acres. In 1664 Thomas Manning purchased Edward Darcy's share of Theobush Manning and had the entire tract patented in his name, but the Bill of Sale wasn't recorded by Edward Dorsey (son of Edward Darcy) until 1670.

Caroline Kemper Bulkley in a 1938 article contended that he was living in 1667. [23]

Know all men by these presents that I Edward DORSEY of the County of Ann Arundell, Boatwright, have granted bargained and Sold, for a Valuable Consideracon allready received all my right title intrest Clame and demand of an in a warrant, for two hundred acres of Said Land bearing date one thousand six hundred and fifty and also two hundred acres more, being the one half of a warrant for four hundred acres the one half belonging to Capt Norwood bearing date one thousand six hundred fifty one, unto George Yate of the said County his heirs or assignes for ever from me the Said DORSEY my heir assignes forever Winttness my hand and Seal the xxiiid day of April MDCLxvij Signed Sealed and delivered in Edward DORSEY Seale the presence of us Cornelius Howard John HOWARD October the xxvi MDCLxvij[5]</i>

1667 Edward Dorsey assigns 200 acres to Yate

In 1667 Edward Dorsey assigned 200 acres, originally granted to John Norwood, to George Yate. [24]

"Warrant MDCL, granted to Edward Dorsey, of Anne Arundel Co.,

  • for 200 acres of land, which he assigns as followeth; as also 200 acres more, part of a warrant for 400 acres, granted John Norwood and the said Dorsey, dated XXIII of Feb., MDCLI.
  • Know all men by these presents that I, Edward Dorsey, of the County of Anne Arundel, boatwright, have granted, bargained and sold, for a valuable consideration, already received, all my right, title, interest of and in a warrant for 200 acres, bearing date 1650, and also 200 acres more, being half of a warrant of 400 acres-the one half belonging to Captain Norwood, bearing date, 1651, both of which assigned to George Yate.
  • ---Edward Dorsey, Sealed."
  • Signed in the presence of Cornelius Howard, John Howard, Oct. 22nd, MDCLXVII, (1667). [24]

That same year the same Edward Dorsey assigned to Cornelius Howard, his right for land for transporting seven persons into the province. Edward Dorsey and Thomas Manning held a certificate from Thomas Marsh, for 600 acres adjoining Captain Norwood. "Norwood's Fancy," held by Captain Norwood, was near Round Bay. Dorsey, held by Edward Dorsey, gave the name to "Dorsey's Creek," upon which was located Thomas Gates, whose will of 1659, reads: "I give to Michael Bellott and John Holloway my plantation. I desire that they give to Edward Dorseys children free outlet to the woods and spring as formally I have given them." The following transfer, of 1668, further locates the above testator: "George Yate, 1668, assigned to Colonel Edward Dorsey, sixty acres called "Dorsey," on the south side of the Severn, on Dorsey's Creek, running to a cove called Freeman's, then up said cove to Captain John Norwood's, then bounding on a line of a place formally held by Thomas Gates." [24]

Colonel Edward Dorsey, son and heir of Edward Dorsey, the immigrant, held this tract of "Dorsey" during life. It was sold by his widow, Margaret, the wife of John Israel, in 1706, to Wm. Bladen, of Annapolis.

The following record is taken from "Our Early Settlers."-A list of our early arrivals up to 1680.[24]

"Robert Bullen demands lands for bringing over a number of passengers, amongst whom was Edward Dorsey, in 1661."[24]

The same record adds, "Aug. 25th, 1664, patented to him, John and Joshua Dorsey, a plantation called "Hockley-in-the-Hole," four hundred acres."[24]

In 1683, this land was resurveyed for John Dorsey, and found to contain 843 acres. 400 acres first surveyed heing old rents remaining new, whole now in the possession of Caleb Dorsey.[24]

Such is the record of "Hockley" upon our Rent Rolls, at Annapolis.[24]

Among the restored records, collected by a commission, Hon. Wm. Holland, president, Samuel Young, Captain Richard Jones and Mr. John Brice, appointed after the fire of 1704, to renew the land records then destroyed, is the following:[24]

"Came 1707, Mr. Caleb Dorsey, of Hockley, and petitioned the honorable members to have the following recorded:[24]

"To all Christian people to whom this writing shall come, be heard, read, or seen, I, Edward Dorsey, of the County of Anne Arundel, son and heir of the late Edward Dorsey, gentleman, deceased, for the consideration of 24,000 pounds of good merchantable tobacco, transfer my right in a tract of land called "Hockley­-in-the-Hole," granted to Edward, Joshua and John Dorsey, in 1664, to my brother, John Dorsey, and I further covenant to guarantee his right to said land against any demand that may descend from my said father, Edward Dorsey, for or by reason of any right due to him in his life time, or by reason of any survey by him made, or warrant returned, or for any other reason of any other matter." After his signature, fully attested, follows a deed from Joshua Dorsey, for his right in said tract for a consideration of 8,000 pounds of tobacco, to his brother, John Dorsey. After which, also, John Dorsey petitioned for a resurvey and increased it to 842 acres. The date of Edward Dorsey's transfer was 1681. He states that his father, who was living in 1667, was then dead.[24]

Edward Dorsey, the last mentioned, in 1679 and 1685, was recorded one of the justices of Anne Arundel. His name was written both Darcy and Dorsey.[24]

1680 Public Service

From 1680 to 1705, Major Dorsey was in every movement looking to the development of the colony. [24]

1694 Judge

From 1694 to 1696 he was Judge of the High Court of Chancery, during which time he was commissioned to hold the Great Seal. [24]

In 1694, he was a member of the House of Burgesses for Anne Arundel, and from 1697 to his death, in 1705, was a member from Baltimore County (now Howard). [24]

He was one of the subscribers and treasurer of the fund for building St. Anne's church, and a free school for the province also received his aid. [24]

He signed the protestant address from Baltimore County to the King's most gracious Majestie, upon the succession of King William III --- an appeal in behalf of Charles Lord Baron of Baltimore, whose proprietary government had been wrested from the family through the influence of Captain John Coode. Though a Protestant, he was found in support of a government which left religious faith untouched.

Mrs. Potter Palmer, of Chicago, a descendant, reviewing the record, writes: "Edward Dorsey and others were joined in the protestant effort to have Lord Baltimore's government taken from the hands of the Catholics, and made a Crown Colony under a Protestant governor. They took part in all the movements to that end, but having been personal friends of Lord Baltimore, and lovers of justice, after the Protestant government was established, they joined in a petition to the king to restore Lord Baltimore's lands to him. The king acted favorably on this petition and did so restore these lands, which were enjoyed, with all their private rights, rents and revenues, by the Baltimores during all the time the government was vested in the Crown and the Protestants in power.[24]

"Edward Dorsey would not have been given position and honors by the royal government had he been against it. He must have been one of the most influential Protestants in the colony, for the new capital was taken to his land in Annapolis, and not to that of William Burgess on the South River, or to that of Nicholas Greenberry, opposite on Town Neck. He seems to have been the presiding genius on all committees to build the town."[24]

Marriage

Major Edward Dorsey married, first, Sarah, daughter of Nicholas Wyatt, the pioneer surveyor of the Severn, who had come up from Virginia with his wife, Damaris, and her daughter, Mary, afterward the wife of Major John Welsh. She was the half-sister of Sarah (Wyatt) Dorsey. Upon the death of Nicholas Wyatt, in 1673, he left a will made in 1671, in which Mrs. Wyatt was made executrix. Upon her subsequent marriage to Thomas Bland, the attorney, there was a contest in chancery, in which Major Edward Dorsey, as the representative of his wife, the heir, contended for the administration of the estate, on the ground of a subsequent revocation of the will of 1671. From that case in chancery, a view of Nicholas Wyatt's neighbors is given.[24]

Captain Cornelius Howard wrote the will, and testified that the testator did not appear to be in condition at that time, to remember what he owned. He stated that Richard Warfield and Edward Dorsey knew more than he did of the revocation. Thomas Bland asked for a "Commission to Samuel Chew to call before him Captain Cornelius Howard, Robert Gudgeon, Nicholas Shepherd, Richard and Ellen Warfield, John Watkins, Mary Evans, Sarah Cooper, Benjamin Stringer, Guy Meeke, Johanna Sewell, John and Mary Welsh and Maurice Baker; and that they be cross-examined concerning the revocation, or confirmation of the said deceased." The case, after an extended discussion by both leading lawyers, in which Major Dorsey contended that "the heir, not the administrator can alone make good the warranty," was decided in favor of Major Dorsey, who administered.[24]

As Major of the Horse, he joined Captain Edward Burgess, in asking for additional arms and ammunition for defense.[24]

Children

Edward Dorsey and wife Ann had four children. Logic for estimating their birth years appears earlier.

  1. Edward Dorsey, b. say 1639, Lower Norfolk County, Virginia. This would make him born in Virginia prior to immigration, and make him aged 20 at the time of Thomas Gates' will in 1659. Edward Dorsy, "Son and heir of Edward Dorsy late of the County of Ann Arundell" sold the parcel Hockley in the Hole granted to "the said Edward Dorsy, Joshua Dorsy and John Dorsey my brothers" on 20 Aug. 1664. [25] b. say 1644; m.1 Sarah WYATT; [26] m.2 Margaret [27] d. between 26 Oct. 1704 and 31 Dec. 1705 Baltimore Co., MD7[5]Col. Edward Dorsey; Other sources estimated his birth year as 1646.
  2. Joshua Dorsey [25] b. say 1641, or 1649, Province of Maryland. This would make him also born in Virginia prior to immigration, and aged 18 in 1659. He m. Sarah; [28] d. between 20 Feb. 1687 [28]He made bequests to "cousins" (i.e. nephews) John, Samuel and Matthew Howard, [children of Matthew Howard.] [28] 6 and 3 May 1688 [29] Anne Arundel Co., MD. [28][5]Joshua Dorsey. Other sources estimated his birth year as 1646.
  3. John Dorsey [25] b. say 1643, or 1647 Province of Maryland. He would have been born in Virginia just prior to immigration, and aged 16 in 1659. He m. Pleasance [30] d. between 26 Nov. 1714 and 22 Mar. 1714/5 Baltimore Co., MD [30]Captain John Dorsey; Other sources estimated his birth year as 1643 or 1647.
  4. Sarah Dorsey. If she was born in 1645, it would have been just prior to her father's immigration. Or born 1650 in Lower Norfolk, Virginia? [31] b. say 1650; By 1667 m. Matthew Howard [32]; d. before 3 Oct. 1691 Anne Arundel Co., MD[5] Other sources estimated her birth year as 1647 or even 1656.

No Daughter Ann

Some researchers have also attributed to Edward Dorsey a daughter Ann, who married Nicholas Greenberry. There is no evidence that Edward Dorsey had a daughter named Ann. While Nicholas Greenberry's wife was named Ann, she could not have been a daughter of Edward Dorsey. Nicholas Greenberry did not emigrate from England to Maryland until 1674, at which time he arrived with his wife and two children.3 His wife could not have been the daughter of Edward DORSEY, who had been living in the colonies for over 25 years.[5]

1694 Annapolis Town Lots

In 1694, Major Dorsey was upon the committee with Major John Hammond, Hon. John Dorsey, Captain Philip Howard, Major Nicholas Greenberry and John Bennett, to lay out town lots and a town common for "the town of Proctor," or Annapolis. In 1705, he sold a row of houses upon Bloomsbury Square, Annapolis, which had been entailed to his children, but which, for want of tenants, had greatly depreciated. [24]

Major's Choice

At the time of his death, he was living on "Major's Choice," now Howard County. The second wife was Margaret Larkin, daughter of John Larkin. He left five minors by her. She afterwards became Mrs. John Israel, and as executrix, sold "Dorsey" and houses in Annapolis, lately owned by Colonel Edward Dorsey, her late husband." [24]

1705 Will

Colonel Dorsey's will, of 1705, recorded in Baltimore City and in Annapolis, reads:

  • "To my son Lacon, my tract "Hockley," on the Patapsco Falls.
  • To sons Charles, Lacon, Francis and Edward, my lands on the north side of Patapsco River. (These were deeded to him by John and Thomas Larkin, 1702).
  • To my beloved wife, Margaret, my personal estate.
  • To my daughter, Ann, a lot of negroes.
  • To Joshua, "Barnes Folly."
  • To Samuel, "Major's Choice."
  • To Nicholas," Long Reach," at Elk Ridge.
  • To Benjamin," Long Reach."
  • To son John, all the remaining part of "Long Reach" and a lot of silver spoons, to be delivered at the age of sixteen.
  • All the remaining portion of my estate to my wife and executrix.-Edward DORSEY. (Seal.)"

Colonel Edward Dorsey's heirs will be found in Howard County records.

Samuel exchanged with his brother, Joshua, his interest in "Major's Choice," and held the lands of his mother, upon "Wyatt's Hill," on the Severn. His wife was Jane Dorsey. Their daughter, Patience-Samuel Howard, of Philip, in 1740.

After the death of Colonel Dorsey, Samuel contested the sale of Bloomsbury Square, on the ground that it was entailed property, and though he was of age at the time of sale, he was not consulted by his father. The title remained in the purchaser.

Source: (The Founders of Ann Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland: A Genealogical and Biographical Review from Wills, Deeds and Church Records, Baltimore, MD. by J. D. Warfield, Published by Kohn & Pollock, 1905; Transcribed by Jan Grant; Proofread by Shannon Thomas)

Sources

  1. Harry Wright Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry: A Genealogical History of Twenty-Two Pioneers of Anne Arundel County, Md., and their Descendants. Baltimore: Lord Baltimore Press. Maryland Pioneer Series, 1933, p3.
  2. Caroline Kemper Bulkley, Identity of Edward Dorsey I: A New Approach to an Old Problem. Maryland Historical Magazine,Vol XXXIII, No. 1March, 1938, p. 27-54. http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc5800/sc5881/000001/000000/000129/pdf/msa_sc_5881_1_129.pdf. Accessed June 7, 2016
  3. "The Dorsey Heritage," Broadneck Hundred III, No. 3 (1979): 13-44. Cited by Saunders.
  4. The Dorsey/Darsey/Darcy/Dossey/D'Arcy/Dorcey DNA Project Results. Cited by Saunders
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 Edward Dorsey. Website of Fredric Z. Saunders, Professional Genealogist (fzsaund@ix.netcom.com), 1234 Waterside Cove #21, Midvale, UT 84047-4293 http://home.netcom.com/~fzsaund/dorsey.html. Last revised: 13 Dec 2014. Accessed July 19, 2015.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Dorsey DNA Lineage Site provides results of extensive DNA research on various Dorsey lineages
  7. C. Handy
  8. Harry Wright Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry: A Genealogical History of Twenty-Two Pioneers of Anne Arundel County, Md., and their Descendants. Baltimore: Lord Baltimore Press. Maryland Pioneer Series, 1933, p 5.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 Account of Edward Dorsey at "we relate" citing Maxwell J. Dorsey and Jean Muir Dorsey and Nannie Ball Nimmo. Dorsey: The Dorsey Family. (1947 by the authors). and Folger McKinsey. History of Frederick County, Maryland. (1910; compiled by Nancy Jacobsen <njacobsen@charter.net>). http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:Edward_Dorsey_(5). Accessed July 18, 2015
  10. J. Reaney Kelly, Quakers in the Founding of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, (Baltimore: The Maryland Historical Society, 1963), 15. (Ann Dorsey and "hir husband" [not named] mentioned in a 1658 letter.) Edward Dorsey was the only Dorsey in Anne Arundel County at that time who was married. Cited by Saunders
  11. James Greneff will, Maryland wills 2:215-216 [image 216/412]. and Maryland wills 7:79-80 [image 84/412] Mentions wife Ann, "brother John Howard" and "brother Samuel Howard." Cited by Saunders.
  12. Note that the calendar in use at the time ran from March 25 till March 24, so February 1642 came after December 1642
  13. Minute book A, f. 293, Lower Norfolk Co., Portmouth, Va.
  14. Minute Book A, f. 299: minute Book B, f 133a, Lower Norfolk Co., Portmouth, Va.
  15. Minute Book B, f 126a, Lower Norfolk Co., Portmouth, Va.
  16. Joshua Dorsey Warfield, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. Baltimore, MD: Kohn & Pollack. Reprinted 1973, Baltimore, MD, Regional Publishing Co. p. 11. <i/>
  17. Minute Book A, f 261; (patents 4, f 541; patents 10, f 19; Lower Norfolk Co., Portmouth, Va.
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 Unsourced article. Replace this note when source for article is found. All citations to "article" are to the same unsourced article.
  19. Harry Wright Newman, Anne Arundel Gentry: A Genealogical History of Twenty-Two Pioneers of Anne Arundel County, Md., and their Descendants. Baltimore: Lord Baltimore Press. Maryland Pioneer Series, 1933, p 6.
  20. Archives of Maryland 41:314. Cited by Saunders.
  21. Joshua Dorsey Warfield, The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland. Baltimore, MD: Kohn & Pollack. Reprinted 1973, Baltimore, MD, Regional Publishing Co. p. 30.
  22. Long Reach Community Association It all Began Here Accessed August 12, 2017. jhd
  23. Caroline Kemper Bulkley, "Identity of Edward Dorsey I, A New Approach to an Old Problem," Maryland Historical Magazine, XXXIII (1938), pp. 27-55 [image 37 of 116]. Cited by Saunders.
  24. 24.00 24.01 24.02 24.03 24.04 24.05 24.06 24.07 24.08 24.09 24.10 24.11 24.12 24.13 24.14 24.15 24.16 24.17 24.18 24.19 24.20 24.21 24.22 Genealogy Trails History Group: Anne Arundel County Maryland Biographies Edward Dorsey, Immigrant Accessed August 12, 2017. jhd
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 Anne Arundel Co., MD land records IH3:62-63, FHL microfilm 0,013,208. 6 Dec. 1681 . Cited by Saunders.
  26. Anne Arundel Co., MD land records WT2:574-577, FHL microfilm 0,013,209. Nicholas Wyatt was granted Wyatts Ridge of 450 acres by survey returned 16 Dec. 1664. One half, 225 acres "became the right of Sarah Wyatt who intermarried Edwd Dorsey of the County, Gent." Cited by Saunders
  27. Edward Dorsey will, MD wills 3:725-727 [image 357/387]. Cited by Saunders.
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 28.3 Joshua Dorsey will, Maryland wills 6:8, [image 12/423]. Cited by Saunders. He made bequests to "cousins" (i.e. nephews) John, Samuel and Matthew Howard, [children of Matthew Howard.]
  29. John Acton will, MD wills 6:1-2 [image 5/423]. Sarah Dorsey called widow and relict of Joshua Dorsey. Cited by Saunders.
  30. 30.0 30.1 John Dorsey will, MD wills 14:26-29 [image 26/326]. Cited by Saunders
  31. Joshua Dorsey will, Maryland wills 6:8, [image 12/423]. He made bequests to "cousins" (i.e. nephews) John, Samuel and Matthew Howard, [children of Matthew Howard.] Also Maryland Patents 10:499, FHL microfilm 0,013,068. Cited by Saunders.

See also:

  • Early Immigrants to Virginia from the 1500s and 1600s, compiled by June Kinard. Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000.Original data - Published by The Researchers, PO box 39063, Indianapolis IN. 46239-0063.
  • Side-Lights on Maryland History: With Sketches of Early Maryland Families, by Hester Dorsey Richardson. [First] published serially in the Baltimore Sunday sun from May 17, 1903, to December 25, 1904.
  • Genealogy and History of These Families: William Cumming, Dorsey, Black, Weisel by Edith L Burrell, Findlay OH.
  • Text: Dorsey Dreams, Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 1-3; No. 4, p. 47; p. 265; p. 303.
  • The Dorsey Family, Maxwell J. Dorsey, Wright Dorsey, Jean Muir Dorsey, Nannie Ball Nimmo, [1] Baltimore: Clearfield
  • Southern Dorsey by Paxson, [2]


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Memories: 2

On 18 Oct 2018 Fann Fann wrote:

Just for the record:

Edward Darcy (ca. 1590-1639) of Hornby Castle Yorkshire and London in Middlesex, and his wife:

Elizabeth Conyers (ca. 1595-1619), are ruled OUT.


On 28 Sep 2010 Dawn Truitt wrote:

"Edward Darcy/Dorsey the Immigrant,lived several yrs in virginia.Various spellings of his name appear on the deeds nd land patents of lower Norfolk Goumty,Virginia between 1642-1648. Various spellings of the name appear on records in Maryland but the orignal signatures of the sons of the Immigrant spelled the name Dorsey By 1648 freedom of worship was prohibited nd life there was less attractive,many settlers turned to the newly erected County of Anne Arundel Maryland where alluring inducements to obtain land were being offered nd where freedom of worship was said to be guaranteed Among those who went were_Edward Dorsey,John Norwood,Matthew Howard,ThomasTodd nd NBicholas Wyatt. In 1658 the Quakers came to Maryland spreading their religion amonst the settlers,claiming as their converts Thomas Mears,Nichkos Wyatt,Edward& Ann Dorsey nd many others.The Dorsey's did embrace the faith shown in a letter written by Robert Clarkson a Quaker comvert to Elizabeth Harris then in England he said "Ann Dorsey had abundant grace but he seemed doubtful that her husband would stick to the faith.Edward Dorsey drowned before 8/2/1659 off kent island,it is recorded in the court records. Ann his wife is thought to have gone back to Virginia. as copied



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On 27 Jan 2017 at 22:32 GMT Anne B wrote:

Saving generated the following notice:

Warning: Check the data.

A father's death date should not be more than nine months before one of his children's birth dates.

Refer's to 2nd John b. 1662

On 8 Jun 2016 at 20:30 GMT Jack Day wrote:

Dorsey-1154 and Dorsey-254 appear to represent the same person because: Same person, essentially same dates, same time and place, same children.

On 18 Jul 2015 at 23:54 GMT Jack Day wrote:

The early generations of Dorseys and Howards are quite confusing, so it's highly important to have an inline source for each fact, so that when confusion arises it's possible to ascertain which facts are reliable and which are not!

On 20 Nov 2014 at 14:21 GMT C Handy wrote:

Edward Dorsey of Maryland was not related to the Anglo-Norman Darcy family; his father was not Edward Darcy=. His parentage is unknown, his origins, however, are ultimately Irish. (See Y-DNA results of descendants, here: http://www.contexo.info/DorseyDNA/LineageI.htm and NB that the Y-DNA haplotype does NOT match descendants of the D'Arcys who came with William the Conqueror). He is not at all likely to have any sort of connection to any members of the peerage or even the gentry. He named his plantation "Hockley in the Hole"; Hockley-in-the-Hole was a London slum on the banks of the Fleet ditch (an open sewer) famous for bear-baiting and other low amusements, and certainly not something that someone from a gentry family would think of to name a plantation after.

Edward is 27 degrees from Lizzie Griffiths, 17 degrees from Fred Rogers and 12 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.