Gospatric I (Dunbar) of Dunbar

Gospatric (Dunbar) of Dunbar (abt. 1040 - abt. 1074)

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Gospatric (Gospatric I) [uncertain] "Earl of Northumbria, Lord of Allerdale and Carlisle" of Dunbar formerly Dunbar
Born about in Northumberland, Englandmap [uncertain]
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died about in Ubbanford (Norham), Scotlandmap
Profile last modified 6 Jun 2019 | Created 12 Sep 2010
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Gospatric or Cospatric (d.after 1073) was the Earl of Northumbria for a few years. After the Conqueror stripped him of his earldom in 1072, he fled to Scotland where he briefly held the title of the 1st Earl of Dunbar. [1] [2]
Clan Dunbar tartan.
Gospatric I (Dunbar) of Dunbar is a member of Clan Dunbar.
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Contents

Biography

Name and Titles

Preceded by
Osulf
Earl of Northumbria [1]
1067–1068
Succeeded by
Robert Comine
Preceded by
Robert Comine
Earl of Northumbria [1] [3] [4]
1069 - 1072 [5]
Succeeded by
Waltheof
Preceded by
1st Earl of Dunbar [6]
after 1072
Succeeded by
Gospatric II

Parents

previously, Disputed, but Feb-March discussions 2017, resulted in conclusion that Maldred was the father, and Maldred's spouse has been confirmed
Father: Maldred, Lord of Allerdale
Mother: Ealdgyth of Northumbria [1] [2]
Research on ancestry can be ongoing and discussion to be placed here. some changes in bio made end of March 2017

Marriage, Mistresses and Issue


(March 2017 reviewed and some Bio conclusions and statements were redrafted. Work in progress)
  • Aethelreda Wessex-311 has been returned as spouse. this is one of several important items to be reviewed and properly presented in the Profile Bio. Work in progress (Aug 2015)

Married:with Aethelreda now listed as spouse, it should be mentioned that the dispute was about past discussions that wife is Unknown, sister of Edmund. Parentage unknown. Her identity is known from charters confirmed King Stephen which prove Gospatric had married into the royal family but a name was not selected. [2]
Children of Gospatric by his wife: [2]
Children who are felt with certainty to be legitimate.
  • Gospatric. (Earl) of Cumberland, Died 22 Aug 1138 at the Battle of the Standard [7].
  • Waltheof, Baron of Allerdale, m. Sigrid; (inserted Feb 2017) His legitimacy is not questioned by Simeon of Durham, and is clearly supported by the solid recent historical source. [7]
Cawley puts Waltheof and Dolfin in the illegitimate category, however, I feel his discussion is not adequate on Waltheof. See Waltheof for expanded comments. [2]
Children of Gospatric and unknown or uncertain mother: [2]
These children will be considered by his wife
  • Ethelreda (alias: Octreda or Uhtreda)[8] [9]
m.1. Duncan of Scotland
m.2 (disputed) Waltheof (Father: Gillemin) [10] [11]
  • Gunhilda m. Orm (Father: Ketel) [2]
  • Matilda m. Dolfin (Father: Ailward) [2]
agreed that this eldest son is by wife
  • Dolfin (Earl) of Cumberland (d. after 1092) [7] [2]


Property

"A recently discovered document, shows that Gospatric was a large landowner in Cumberland. Before this, it was believed that his son Waldeve was the first holder of Allerdale. But the writ shows Gospatric exercising full rights before Henry I, who confirmed Waldeve's rights." [4]
After 1072, Malcolm gave Gospatric the earldom of Dunbar with lands in Lothian. [4]

Death

"According to the chronicler Hoveden,[12] Gospatric died at Ubbanford (Norham), and was buried in the porch of the church. .... This contradicts a tradition (confused with Gospatric III by Roger of Hovden), [13] that Gospatric died as a monk at Durham. He was allegedly buried there, commemorated in obituaries as 'comes et monachus,' ... and has a a tombstone bearing the inscription 'Gosparticus comes.' In 1821, it was found in the monks' burial-ground, and is now in the crypt of Durham cathedral. The circumstantial account of his death and burial at Norham (also confused with Gospatric III by Roger of Hoveden),[13] casts doubt on tradition without clear evidence." [4]

Timeline

  • 1061: accompanies Earl Tosti (Harold's brother) to Rome, where he tried to save the Earl's life, though the story may be told of the elder Gospatric, his uncle.
  • Late 1067 or 1068/9: made Earl of Northumberland by William the Conqueror
  • 1068: Conspiracy against Conqueror with Edgar the Etheling ... they ends up fleeling to Scotland in 1072.
  • 1069: Assists Dane invasion, supported by Edgar Aetheling. William puts down the rebellion. Gospatric makes peace by proxy.
  • 1071: escorts Bishop Walcher from York to Durham.
  • Oct or Nov 1072: Flees to Scotland; earldom stripped; charged with taking part in a massacre at Durham. Cousin Malcolm III grants him Dunbar with adjacent lands in Lothian.
  • c.1075: Presumed dead.

Sources

Footnotes and citations:
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Wikipedia: Gospatric Earl of Northumbria
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 Cawley. Medieval Lands: Gospatric Earl of Northumbria
  3. English Monarchs Website
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 RootsWeb, Jim Weber Personal Site - contains good information on Gospatric
  5. Barlow, The Feudal Kingdom (1961):93
  6. Weis. Ancestral Roots. (2004):49
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 McGuigan. Neither Scotland nor England (PhD. Thesis, 2015):377
  8. Wikipedia: Ethelreda, daughter of Gospatric
  9. [1] Notes and Queries (February 1905).
  10. [2] Books.Google.com LINK to Unknown Book
  11. Ethelreda is called "Octreda" in the Dugale and Prescott versions of the Cronicon Cumbriæ.[3]
  12. Cokayne Peerage p504
  13. 13.0 13.1 Dunbar, Scottish Kings. (1906):49.
Source list:
  • Barlow, F. The Feudal Kingdom of England: 1042 - 1216, 2nd ed. (London: Lowe & Brydone Ltd., 1961):108. Archive.org LINK.
  • Cokayne, G.E. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct, or Dormant, Vol.4. p503-506,(London, 1910). LINK.
  • Dunbar, Sir Archibald Hamilton. Scottish Kings: A Revised Chronology of Scottish History, 1005-1625, with Notices of the Principal Events, Years, Pedigrees, Tables, Calendars, p4-7, (Edinburgh, 1906). Books.Google.com LINK
  • Leo van de Pas. Family line with sources for Gospatric, father Maldred, grandmother Bethoc, GGF Malcolm II. Online Forum Post, SGM, October 8 2012, Canberra Australia, soc.genealogy.medieval Forum
  • McGuigan, Neil. Neither Scotland nor England: Middle Britain, c.850-1150. (University of St Andrews, PhD. Thesis, 2015):278, 377. PhD. Thesis Online.
  • Orderic Vitalis
  • Roger of Hoveden, d. ca. 1201 "Chronica magistri Rogeri de Houedene"; p59; William Stubbs published 1868 Maldred & Gospatric Dunbar online text
  • Symeon of Durham, Thomas Arnold ed. Symeonis Monachi Opera Omnia: Historia Ecclesisae Dunhelmensis. (London, 1882): vol. 1, p. 216. Books.google.com LINK
  • Weis, F. L., Sheppard, W.L., Beall, W.R., & Beall, K.E. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists who Came to America Before 1700: Lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and Other Historical Individuals. (Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004):49. Google Books Books.Googlr.com LINK.

British Aristocracy
Gospatric I (Dunbar) of Dunbar was a member of aristocracy in the British Isles.
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Memories: 1

On 31 Jan 2012 Paul Lee wrote:

Lord Maldred & his wife had four children:

1. GOSPATRICK ([1040/48]-[1075]). Simeon of Durham names "Cospatric son of Maldred son of Crinan" when recording that he was appointed Earl of Northumberland[382]. Earl of Northumberland from Dec 1067.

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SCOTTISH%20NOBILITY.htm#GospatrickDunbardied1075B

GOSPATRICK, son of MALDRED Lord of Allerdale & his wife Ealdgyth of Northumbria ([1040/48]-[1075]). Simeon of Durham names "Cospatric son of Maldred son of Crinan" when recording that he was appointed Earl of Northumberland[390]. His parentage is given by Roger of Hoveden[391]. He paid William I King of England a heavy fine so he could succeed as Earl of Northumberland in Dec 1067, although he did have a hereditary claim through his mother's family. He rebelled against King William and joined the invading Norwegians who sailed up the river Humber in Sep 1069 and captured York by storm[392]. Gospatrick fled but was pardoned. In [Oct/Nov] 1072 old charges were brought against him and he was deprived of the earldom of Northumberland, fleeing to Scotland. Simeon of Durham records that he fled to Malcolm King of Scotland who granted him "Dunbar with the lands adjacent in Lothian"[393].

m ---, sister of EDMUND, daughter of ---. The Complete Peerage records the wife of Gospatrick as the sister of Edmund, but does not cite the primary source on which this is based[394].

Earl Gospatrick & his wife had seven children:

1. DOLFIN . Simeon of Durham names "Dolfin, Walther and Cospatric" as the sons of Gospatrick[395]. He is named first of the three sons of Gospatrick given by Roger of Hoveden[396]. He was expelled from Carlisle in 1092[397]. m ---. The name of Dolfin´s wife is not known. Dolfin & his wife had one child:

a) UHTRED FitzDolfin de Cungeston [Conistone] . He held land at Conistone in the honour of Skipton and in Burnsall in the Bulmer fief[398]. m ---. The name of Uhtred´s wife is not known. Uhtred & his wife had two children:

i) SIMON . He was ancestor of the Hebden family[399].

ii) KETEL .

2. WALTHEOF . Simeon of Durham names "Dolfin, Walther and Cospatric" as the sons of Gospatrick[400]. He is named second of the three sons of Gospatrick given by Roger of Hoveden[401]. The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Ranulphus de Meschines” enfeoffed “Waldevum filium Cospatricii de Dunbar comitem in Scotia” with “tota baronia de Allerdale” and that “Willielmus de Meschines dominus de Coupland” enfeoffed “Waldevum filium Cospatricii” with “tota terra inter Cocar et Derwent”[402]. "…Cospatric frater Dalfin, Waldef frater suus…" witnessed inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow[403]. Lord of Allerdale. Abbot of Crowland [1126] to Dec 1138, when he was deposed at the legatine council of Westminster[404]. An undated agreement between Geoffrey abbot of St Albans and "Gospatric the earl" recites that the abbot granted Gospatric and "his son Adam (…formerly called Waldief)" the "land of Archil Morel…Beuuicke"[405]. “Waldevus filius Cospatrici comitis” donated property to Gysburn Priory, with the consent of “uxore mea Sigrida et filiis meis Cospatrico et Alano”, by undated charter which names “El. filio Erlafi presbyteri cognate meo”[406]. m SIGRID, daughter of ---. “Waldevus filius Cospatrici comitis” donated property to Gysburn Priory, with the consent of “uxore mea Sigrida et filiis meis Cospatrico et Alano”, by undated charter[407]. Waltheof & his wife had three children:

a) ALAN . “Waldevus filius Cospatrici comitis” donated property to Gysburn Priory, with the consent of “uxore mea Sigrida et filiis meis Cospatrico et Alano”, by undated charter[408]. "…Alano filio Waldeof et Gospatrico fratre suo…" witnessed a charter dated 1139 under which "David Rex Scotie" confirmed the grant of Coldingham by "Gospatricus comes frater Dolfini" to St Cuthbert[409]. “Alanus filius Walleovi, filii Cospatrici comitis” donated property to Gysburn Priory by undated charter, witnessed by “matre mea Sigarith…”, which names “Athelwardo clerico, filio Erlavi sacerdotis”[410].

b) ETHELDREDA . The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Alanus filius et hæres eiusdem Waldevi” enfeoffed “Ranulpho” with property and “Etheldreda sorore sua”[411]. m RANULF, son of ---.

c) GUNHILD . The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Alanus filius et hæres eiusdem Waldevi” enfeoffed “Ugthredo filio Fergus domino Galwediæ” with property and “Guynolda sorore sua”[412]. m UHTRED, son of FERGUS Lord of Galloway & his wife --- (-1174). He succeeded his father in [1136] as Lord of Galloway.

Waltheof had one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress:

d) GOSPATRICK . The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Alanus filius et hæres eiusdem Waldevi” had “unum fratrem bastardum…Cospatricium” to whom he granted property[413]. "…Gospatricius filius Waltheof…" witnessed the possibly spurious charter dated to [1120] of "Alexander…Rex Scottorum…Sibilla regina Scottorum…"[414]. "…Gospatricio filio Waltheui" witnessed the charter dated 1124 under which "Alexander…Rex Scottorum" granted jurisdiction to the prior of Scone[415]. "…Alano filio Waldeof et Gospatrico fratre suo…" witnessed a charter dated 1139 under which "David Rex Scotie" confirmed the grant of Coldingham by "Gospatricus comes frater Dolfini" to St Cuthbert[416]. “Waldevus filius Cospatrici comitis” donated property to Gysburn Priory, with the consent of “uxore mea Sigrida et filiis meis Cospatrico et Alano”, by undated charter[417]. 1156. m ---. The name of Gospatrick´s wife is not known. Gospatrick & his wife had one child:

i) WALTHEOF (-before 1200). m ---. The name of Waltheof´s wife is not known. Waltheof & his wife had children:

(a) daughters .

3. GOSPATRICK (-[killed in battle Cowton Moor, near Northallerton 22 Aug 1138]). Simeon of Durham names "Dolfin, Walther and Cospatric" as the sons of Gospatrick[418]. He is named third of the three sons of Gospatrick by Roger of Hoveden[419].

- see below.

4. ETHELREDA (bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Waldevus filius comitis Cospatricii” enfeoffed “Waldeve filio Gileminii” with property and “Ethreda sorore sua”[420]. The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Ethreda sorore Waldevi patris sui” married “Doncani comes de Murrayse” and that their son “Willielmus” was succeeded by “Alanus filius Waldevi”[421]. The primary source which confirms her second marriage has not yet been identified. It is assumed that Duncan was Ethelreda´s first husband and Waltheof her second husband. m firstly ([1090]) DUNCAN of Scotland, son of MALCOLM III "Caennmor/Bighead" King of Scotland & his first wife --- ([1060]-murdered Monthechim/Mondynes, Kincardineshire 12 Nov 1094, bur Dunfermline Abbey, Fife). He succeeded in 1094 as DUNCAN II King of Scotland. m secondly WALTHEOF, son of GILLEMIN & his wife ---.

5. GUNHILDA . The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Waldevus filius comitis Cospatricii” enfeoffed “Ormo Ketelli” with property and “Gurwelda sorore sua”[422]. m ORM, son of KETIL & his wife ---. Orm & his wife had one child:

a) GOSPATRICK . The 1157 Pipe Roll records "Gospat´z fil Ormi" in Carlisle[423].

6. MATILDA . The Cronicon Cumbriæ records that “Waldevus filius comitis Cospatricii” enfeoffed “Dolfino filio Alwardi” with property and “Matilda sorore sua”[424]. m DOLFIN, son of AYLWARD & his wife ---.




1st Earl of Dunbar. One of the native English lords who at first resisted the Norman invasion. He wa afterwards received into favor by William the Conqueror and in 1069 was made Earl of Northumberland which he bought for a large sum of money from the King.

Installed 1068/69 by William I the Conqueror as Earl, then predominantly an administrative post after his payment of a heavy fine or what would not be thought of as an entrance fee (though his hereditary claim through his maternal grandfather also played a part). In October or November 1027, Gospatric was deprived of the Earldon on a charge of having taken part in a massacre at Durham. He fled to Scotland, where his cousin Malcolm III of Scotland granted him the Mormaorship of Dunbar (Burke's Peerage)

Made a pilgrimage to Rome in 1061.


Gospatric Earl of Northumberland *-9901 [Parents] was born in 1040 in of Northumberland,England. He died about 1075. He was buried in Norham,Northumberland,England. He married Aethelreda Princess of England +-9986 about 1057.

Other marriages:

Edumond, Sister of *

Aethelreda Princess of England +-9986 [Parents] was born about 1042 in of,Dunbar,East Lothian,Scotland. She married Gospatric Earl of Northumberland *-9901 about 1057.

Other Notes:

Gospatric the Earl, son of Maldred

Thane of Dunbar and Lothian

of Scotland

1037ish-1100ish

Born: 1037ish and died 1100ish.

Son of: Maldred.

Brother of:

1. Robert, Prior of Hexham.

2. Uchtred, also Prior of Hexham.

Gostpatric married: not known

Gostpatric and his wife had issue:

1. Dolfin.

2. Walteof, who was a witness to the Inquisitio Davidis, 1116, and obtained from Ranulph and William de Meschines great estates In Cumberland and Westmoreland.

3. Gospatric.


Gospatric the Earl, son of Maldred : An Overview

We know of Gostpatric from the book "Records of the Heath Family", 1913 by George Heath. The entry reads as follows:

Gospatric the Earl, son of Maldred, born about 1037, was confirmed in the earldom of Northumberland in 1067 by William the Conqueror; but he and others of the Saxon nobility, being dissatisfied with the arbitrary government of William the Conqueror (who distributed his favours. liberally to the Normans, but sparingly to the Saxons), became the objects of his resentment, and were forced to fly into Scotland, about anno 1068; but they soon made their peace, returned into their own country, and Gospatric, by advancing large sums of money, got the earldom of Northumberland. Yet, he did not long enjoy it; for having again joined the English malcontents against the Normans, he was deprived of the, earldom, and exiled a second time into Scotland, anno 1072. From thence he travelled into Flanders; and returning into Scotland, Simon Dunelmensis says, that King Malcolm (Canmore), gave him " Dunbar, with the adjacent lands in Lothian," which, with a large extent of land in England and Scotland, passed to his posterity from father to son for eleven generations. As surnames came into use, the family gradually took their name from Dunbar.

His subsequent conduct showed that the King had not misplaced his favours; for he served him faithfully, and contributed to restore peace and order in the kingdom. It was he who destroyed the nest of robbers that haunted Cockburn Forest, for which service he was made Thane (but not Earl) of Dunbar and Lothian, about anno 1080.

Gospatric's descendants, as Earls under various designations, kept the Marches between England and Scotland for about three hundred years, and did homage to the Kings of England for the lands they held in Northumberland. The Earls made grants of land to the Church at Durham, Coldingham, Melrose, and Kelso, &c., and generally sealed the charters conveying the lands with the figure of a Knight on horseback, fully armed, having a drawn sword in the right hand, and a shield either on the left arm or suspended from the neck; each Earl Intending the mounted figure on his seal to be a representation of himself. Many of the charters with the impressions of the Earl's seals still attached to them, are preserved to this day.

He died about 1100, and was buried In the Porch of Norham Church, having had three sons: (1) Dolfin; (2) Walteof, who was a witness to the Inquisitio Davidis, 1116, and obtained from Ranulph and William de Meschines great estates In Cumberland and Westmoreland; and (3) Gospatric.


Sources:

1. The book "Records of the Heath Family", 1913 by George Heath.

2. jj@jjhc.info

(Home)



http://www.thepeerage.com/p10664.htm#i106640

Gospatric, Earl of Northumberland1

M, #106640, b. circa 1040, d. circa 1075

Last Edited=21 Aug 2005

Gospatric, Earl of Northumberland was born circa 1040 at Northumberland, England.2 He was the son of Maldred, Lord of Allerdale and Ealdgyth of Northumberland.1 He married Princess Æthelreda of England.2 He died circa 1075.

Gospatric, Earl of Northumberland gained the title of Earl of Northumberland in 1067.1,3 He was deposed as Earl of Northumberland in 1072.1 He gained the title of Earl of Dunbar in 1072.1

Children of Gospatric, Earl of Northumberland

Dolfin of Scotland, Earl of Cumberland d. a 10921

Waltheof of Scotland, 1st Baron of Allerdale d. c 11381

Gospatrick of Scotland, 2nd Earl of Dunbar d. 22 Aug 11381

Octreda of Scotland 4

Gunhilda of Scotland 4

Matilda of Scotland 4

Ethelreda of Scotland+ 4

Citations

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999), page 178. Hereinafter cited as Britain's Royal Family.

[S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.

[S8] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition, 2 volumes (Crans, Switzerland: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 1999), volume 1, page 13. Hereinafter cited as Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, 106th edition.

[S11] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family, page 179.

Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gospatric or Cospatric (from the Cumbrian "Servant of Saint Patrick"), (died after 1073), was Earl of Northumbria, or of Bernicia, and later lord of sizable estates around Dunbar. While his ancestry is uncertain, his descendants held the Earldom of Dunbar, later known as the Earldom of March, in south-east Scotland until 1435.

Background

Gospatric is often said to have been a son of Maldred son of Crínán of Dunkeld.[1] If this is correct, Maldred was apparently not the son of Crínán's known wife Bethóc, daughter of the Scots king Malcolm II, as Gospatric's descendants made no such claim when they submitted their pleadings in the Great Cause (though according to this link his descendant, Patrick the Seventh Earl of Dunbar, did indeed make a claim to the throne during these pleadings) to determine the succession to the kingship of the Scots after the death of Alexander III.[2] Alternatively, rather than being descended from a half-brother of King Duncan I (Donnchad mac Crínáin), Gospatric may have been the youngest son of Earl Uchtred the Bold (died 1016). Another reconstruction would make Gospatric the grandson of Uchtred's discarded first wife, Ecgfritha, daughter of Aldhun, Bishop of Durham, through Sigrida, her daughter with Kilvert son of Ligulf.[3] Whatever his parentage may have been, Gospatric was clearly an important figure in Northumbria and Cumbria, with ties to the family of Earl Uchtred.

The Life of Edward the Confessor, commissioned by Queen Edith, contains an account of the pilgrimage to Rome of Tostig Godwinson, Earl of Northumbria. It tells how a band of robbers attacked Tostig's party in Italy, seeking to kidnap the Earl. A certain Gospatric "was believed because of the luxury of his clothes and his physical appearance, which was indeed distinguished" to be Earl Tostig, and succeeded in deceiving the would-be kidnappers as to his identity until the real Earl was safely away from the scene. Whether this was the same Gospatric, or a kinsman of the same name, is unclear, but it is suggested that his presence in Tostig's party was as a hostage as much as a guest.[4]

[edit]Harrying of the North

After his victory over Harold Godwinson at Hastings, William of Normandy appointed a certain Copsi or Copsig, a supporter of the late Earl Tostig, who had been exiled with his master in 1065, as Earl of Bernicia in the spring of 1067. Copsi was dead within five weeks, killed by Oswulf, grandson of Uchtred, who installed himself as Earl. Oswulf was killed in the autumn by bandits after less than six months as Earl.[5] At this point, Gospatric, who had a plausible claim to the Earldom given the likelihood that he was related to Oswulf and Uchtred, offered King William a large amount of money to be given the Earldom of Bernicia. The King, who was in the process of raising heavy taxes, accepted.[6]

In early 1068, a series of uprisings in England, along with foreign invasion, faced King William with a dire threat. Gospatric is found among the leaders of the uprising, along with Edgar Ætheling and Edwin, Earl of Mercia and his brother Morcar. This uprising soon collapsed, and William proceeded to dispossess many of the northern landowners and grant the lands to Norman incomers. For Gospatric, this meant the loss of his earldom to Robert Comine and exile in Scotland. King William's authority, apart from minor local troubles such as Hereward the Wake and Eadric the Wild, appeared to extend securely across England.[7]

Gospatric joined the invading army of Danes, Scots, and Englishmen under Edgar the Aetheling in the next year. Though the army was defeated, he afterwards was able, from his possession of Bamburgh castle, to make terms with the conqueror, who left him undisturbed till 1072. The widespread destruction in Northumbria known as the Harrying of the North relates to this period.

[edit]Exile

In 1072 William the Conqueror stripped Gospatric of his Earldom of Northumbria[8], and he replaced by Siward's son Waltheof, 1st Earl of Northampton.

Gospatric fled into exile in Scotland and not long afterwards went by ship to Flanders. When he returned to Scotland he was granted the castle at "Dunbar and lands adjacent to it" and in the Merse by King Malcolm Canmore.[9], This earldom without a name in the Scots-controlled northern part of Bernicia would later become the Earldom of Dunbar.

Gospatric did not long survive in exile according to Roger of Hoveden's chronicle:

[N]ot long after this, being reduced to extreme infirmity, he sent for Aldwin and Turgot, the monks, who at this time were living at Meilros, in poverty and contrite in spirit for the sake of Christ, and ended his life with a full confession of his sins, and great lamentations and penitence, at Ubbanford, which is also called Northam, and was buried in the porch of the church there.

He was the father of three sons,[10], and a daughter named Uchtreda, who married Donnchad, son of King Malcolm Canmore.

The sons were:[11],

Gospatric who was killed at the battle of the Standard in 1138 was his heir.

Dolfin, who seems to have received from Malcolm the government of Carlisle

Waldeve.


Gospatric or Cospatric (from the Cumbric "Servant of Saint Patrick"), (died after 1073), was Earl of Northumbria, or of Bernicia, and later lord of sizable estates around Dunbar. While his ancestry is uncertain, his descendants held the Earldom of Dunbar, later known as the Earldom of March, in south-east Scotland until 1435.

In 1072 William the Conqueror stripped Gospatric of his Earldom of Northumbria[8], and he replaced him with Siward's son Waltheof, 1st Earl of Northampton.

Gospatric fled into exile in Scotland and not long afterwards went to Flanders. When he returned to Scotland he was granted the castle at "Dunbar and lands adjacent to it" and in the Merse by King Malcolm Canmore.[9] This earldom without a name in the Scots-controlled northern part of Bernicia would later become the Earldom of Dunbar.

Gospatric did not long survive in exile according to Roger of Hoveden's chronicle:

[N]ot long after this, being reduced to extreme infirmity, he sent for Aldwin and Turgot, the monks, who at this time were living at Meilros, in poverty and contrite in spirit for the sake of Christ, and ended his life with a full confession of his sins, and great lamentations and penitence, at Ubbanford, which is also called Northam, and was buried in the porch of the church there.

He was the father of three sons,[8] and a daughter named Uchtreda, who married Donnchad, son of King Malcolm Canmore.

The sons were:[8],

  • Gospatric who was killed at the battle of the Standard in 1138 was his heir.
  • Dolfin, who seems to have received from Malcolm the government of Carlisle
  • Waldeve.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gospatric,_Earl_of_Northumbria


1.LDS Baptism: 1 Apr 1933 Temple: SLAKE 2.Endowment: 1 Jun 1933 Temple: SLAKE


Gospatric; installed 1068/9 by William I the Conqueror as Earl, then predominantly an administrative post after his payment of a heavy fine or what would now be thought of as an entrance fee (though his hereditary claim through his maternal grandfather also played a part). Later (Oct or Nov 1072) deprived of the Earldom on a charge of having taken part in a massacre at Durham; fled to Scotland, where his cousin Malcolm III of Scotland granted him the Mormaership of Dunbar. [Burke's Peerage]

A subsequent Earl of Nothumberland was Gospatric, son and heir of Maldred, who in turn was son of Crinan, Lay Abbot of Dunkeld in what is now Perthshire. Gospatric held the Earldom from c Feb 1068/9 to 1072. Gospatric had a hereditary claim to theoffice of Earl of Northumberland, as did several of his successors. Disloyalty or incompetence in governing could lead to an Earls being deprived of his position, however, and when Gospatric rebelled he was ejected. [Burke's Peerage, Earldom & Dukedom of Northumberland, p. 2117]

Pilgrimage to Rome 1061.

GOSPATRIC [a] son of MALDRED,[b] by Ealdgyth, daughter and heir of Ughtred, PRINCE OF NORTHUMBERLAND (and Elgiva, daughter of ETHELRED, KING OF ENGLAND), was born between 1040 and 1048; is probably identical with the "noble youth" of that name whovisited Rome in 1061, in company with Tostig, the brother of Harold II; joined the Danes in an invasion of the north of England, but making peace with William I, was at Christmas 1067 entrusted with the government of Northumberland. Being, however, deprived of that post in October or November 1072, he fled to Scotland, receiving from Malcolm III "Dunbar with the adjacent lands in Lothian." He married. (----), sister of Edmund. He died probably about 1075, and most likely is the "Gospatricus Comes" whose monument was at Durham. He is stated in Hoveden to have died and been buried at Ubbanford [i.e. Norham], not long after his flight to Scotland. [Complete Peerage 4:504]

(a) "Gospatric" is Celtic for "the servant of Patrick" the word "Gwas" meaning "servant" Joseph Bain found the word as "Qwaspatricius" in an inquisition. [b] Maldred was probably brother of Duncan, King of Scotland, 1034-40, who was s. of Crinan,Abbot of Dunkeld, which Crinan is conjectured (by Skene) to be the same as Crinan Tein, the father of this Maldrcd. Gospatric was thus cousin (paternally) to the Scottish and (maternally) to the English Kings.

From: LCnobilus@wmconnect.com [mailto:LCnobilus@wmconnect.com Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2003 1:51 PM To: jimweber@nwintl.com Subject: 1st Earl of Dunbar Hi Jim, According to this Electric Scotland account, it was Gospatrick I who was the first earlof Dunbar. I copied this (a small part) "Traditions and Stories of Scottish Castles -- Dunbar Castle" from their site. You show Gospatrick II as the first earl (ref. #I00234). There are a number of other sites that concur with Electric Scotland.Sowhat do you think? Lora The first traces of this early structure are found in the records relating to William the Conqueror. In 1067, that monarch conferred the Earldom of Northumberland upon Robert Comyn, but he was so unpopular with his vassalsthat he and all his retainers were put to death in 1068 by the inhabitants of the district. Then Cospatrick (sometimes called "Gospatrick ") grandson of Malcolm II., King of Scotland, claimed the Earldom through his mother, who was a daughter ofUchtred, the Saxon Earl of Northumberland, but had ultimately to pay "a great sum of money" for it in 1067 to William the Conqueror. Soon afterwards Cospatrick quarrelled with William, and fled into Scotland with other northern leaders, findingrefugein 1072 with Malcolm III. (Ceanmor), whose wife, St Margaret, was a Saxon Princess. Malcolm conferred upon him "Dunbar with the adjacent lands in Lothian," and he thus became the first Earl of Dunbar. His death took place about 1089, and hewassucceeded by his son, Cospatrick, second Earl of Dunbar, who was a benefactor to the Abbey of Kelso. Before his death in 1139, he had probably begun the erection of Dunbar Castle, as the oldest part of the ruins belong to about that period. ThisEarlwas present at the foundation of Scone Abbey in 1115, and Holyrood Abbey in 1128, the former by Alexander I., and the latter by his brother and successor, David I., sons of Malcolm III. (Ceanmor). My reply to the above is: Gospatric was the firsttosettle in Dunbar, fleeing Northumbria after incurring the wrath of William the Conqueror. However both Burke's Peerage and the Complete Peerage, which are well respected in terms of the peerage of Great Britain, state that his son wasthe firstEarlof Dunbar. So, according to peerage law, I think that BP and CP are probably correct. To be absolutely sure, one might check the Scots Peerage as well. I can see where informally Gospatric could be assumed to be the first Earl of Dunbar,because hewas the first to hold the Castle of Dunbar (there was a castle or something there before, but it was abandoned and may not have been called Dunbar), which became associated with the Earldom of Dunbar. For example in early England,titles wereassociated with holding certain castles/estates, such as Arundel or Shrewsbury, and whoever held them became known as the Earl of Arundel (Sussex) or the Earl of Shrewsbury (Salopshire/Shropshire). To my way of thinking these were the"real"earlsand wereimmensely wealthy in a comparative sense (ie. The Earl of Chester "held" the entire county of Chester and there were only 25 or 30 of these earls who held the entire country). With very few exceptions the Scottish Peerage has maintained this relationship of titles to the holding of certain lands, whereas the English have gotten far away from that. However I suppose that CP and BP did not consider Dunbar Castle to be the honour of an Earldom until Gospatric's son wasproven to be anEarl.The"proof" of the son's status as an Earl did not come until a charter which was confirmed 16 Aug 1139, after his death, mentioned him as "Comes" or Earl. I suppose that one could argue that his father may have been styled an earl as well,but thereis no proof. Jim Weber -------------------- Gospatric, Earl of Northumbria From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gospatric or Cospatric (from the Cumbrian "Servant of Saint Patrick"), (died after 1073), was Earl of Northumbria, or of Bernicia, and later lord of sizable estates around Dunbar. While his ancestry is uncertain, his descendants held the Earldom of Dunbar, later known as the Earldom of March, in south-east Scotland until 1435.

Background

Gospatric is often said to have been a son of Maldred son of Crínán of Dunkeld.[1] If this is correct, Maldred was apparently not the son of Crínán's known wife Bethóc, daughter of the Scots king Malcolm II, as Gospatric's descendants made no such claim when they submitted their pleadings in the Great Cause (though according to this link his descendant, Patrick the Seventh Earl of Dunbar, did indeed make a claim to the throne during these pleadings) to determine the succession to the kingship of the Scots after the death of Alexander III.[2] Alternatively, rather than being descended from a half-brother of King Duncan I (Donnchad mac Crínáin), Gospatric may have been the youngest son of Earl Uchtred the Bold (died 1016). Another reconstruction would make Gospatric the grandson of Uchtred's discarded first wife, Ecgfritha, daughter of Aldhun, Bishop of Durham, through Sigrida, her daughter with Kilvert son of Ligulf.[3] Whatever his parentage may have been, Gospatric was clearly an important figure in Northumbria and Cumbria, with ties to the family of Earl Uchtred. The Life of Edward the Confessor, commissioned by Queen Edith, contains an account of the pilgrimage to Rome of Tostig Godwinson, Earl of Northumbria. It tells how a band of robbers attacked Tostig's party in Italy, seeking to kidnap the Earl. A certain Gospatric "was believed because of the luxury of his clothes and his physical appearance, which was indeed distinguished" to be Earl Tostig, and succeeded in deceiving the would-be kidnappers as to his identity until the real Earl was safely away from the scene. Whether this was the same Gospatric, or a kinsman of the same name, is unclear, but it is suggested that his presence in Tostig's party was as a hostage as much as a guest.[4] [edit]Harrying of the North

After his victory over Harold Godwinson at Hastings, William of Normandy appointed a certain Copsi or Copsig, a supporter of the late Earl Tostig, who had been exiled with his master in 1065, as Earl of Bernicia in the spring of 1067. Copsi was dead within five weeks, killed by Oswulf, grandson of Uchtred, who installed himself as Earl. Oswulf was killed in the autumn by bandits after less than six months as Earl.[5] At this point, Gospatric, who had a plausible claim to the Earldom given the likelihood that he was related to Oswulf and Uchtred, offered King William a large amount of money to be given the Earldom of Bernicia. The King, who was in the process of raising heavy taxes, accepted.[6] In early 1068, a series of uprisings in England, along with foreign invasion, faced King William with a dire threat. Gospatric is found among the leaders of the uprising, along with Edgar Ætheling and Edwin, Earl of Mercia and his brother Morcar. This uprising soon collapsed, and William proceeded to dispossess many of the northern landowners and grant the lands to Norman incomers. For Gospatric, this meant the loss of his earldom to Robert Comine and exile in Scotland. King William's authority, apart from minor local troubles such as Hereward the Wake and Eadric the Wild, appeared to extend securely across England.[7] Gospatric joined the invading army of Danes, Scots, and Englishmen under Edgar the Aetheling in the next year. Though the army was defeated, he afterwards was able, from his possession of Bamburgh castle, to make terms with the conqueror, who left him undisturbed till 1072. The widespread destruction in Northumbria known as the Harrying of the North relates to this period. [edit]Exile

In 1072 William the Conqueror stripped Gospatric of his Earldom of Northumbria[8], and he replaced by Siward's son Waltheof, 1st Earl of Northampton. Gospatric fled into exile in Scotland and not long afterwards went by ship to Flanders. When he returned to Scotland he was granted the castle at "Dunbar and lands adjacent to it" and in the Merse by King Malcolm Canmore.[9], This earldom without a name in the Scots-controlled northern part of Bernicia would later become the Earldom of Dunbar. Gospatric did not long survive in exile according to Roger of Hoveden's chronicle: [N]ot long after this, being reduced to extreme infirmity, he sent for Aldwin and Turgot, the monks, who at this time were living at Meilros, in poverty and contrite in spirit for the sake of Christ, and ended his life with a full confession of his sins, and great lamentations and penitence, at Ubbanford, which is also called Northam, and was buried in the porch of the church there. He was the father of three sons,[10], and a daughter named Uchtreda, who married Donnchad, son of King Malcolm Canmore. The sons were:[11], Gospatric who was killed at the battle of the Standard in 1138 was his heir. Dolfin, who seems to have received from Malcolm the government of Carlisle Waldeve.

References

Barrow, G.W.S., The Kingdom of the Scots. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2003. ISBN 0-7486-1803-1 Fletcher, Richard, Bloodfeud: Murder and Revenge in Anglo-Saxon England. London: Penguin, 2003. ISBN 0-14-028692-6 Stenton, Frank M., Anglo-Saxon England. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1973. ISBN 0-19-280139-2 Forte, Angelo, Oram, Richard, & Pedersen, Frederik, Viking Empires. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. ISBN 0-521-82992-5 Higham, N.J., The Kingdom of Northumbria AD 350-1100. Stroud: Sutton, 1993. ISBN 0-86299-730-5


Gospatrick was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--through his son Waltheof and his daughter UNKNOWN (wife of Angus Gillbride), each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p159.htm#i17950 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm )



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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Gospatric I by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree:

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On 24 Oct 2018 at 21:53 GMT James LaLone wrote:

This Gospatric appears as the same as Mac_Maidred-1

On 27 Sep 2017 at 17:45 GMT Marty Ormond wrote:

reply to C Mackinnon:

I'll be happy to list Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 below with the other sources. I didn't have a member ID and password to pull up the exact entry. on the Gospatric profile and that of his wife it is acknowledged that a first name and exact data is unproven for wife. there are various levels of credibility and depth of research on the entire large Source list. Have to be prepared that none are perfect and some are full of holes. Easy label is "unproven". Discussion has led to listing the wife with a name. The most recent scholarly work that was studied is the McGuigan. "Neither Scotland nor England(2015)" primary sources and some secondary. The Bio wife qualifiers are Highlighted on the profile now. Thanks for your input

On 27 Sep 2017 at 09:49 GMT C. Mackinnon wrote:

ODNB says "the name of Gospatrick's wife in UNKNOWN" [William M. Aird, ‘Gospatric, earl of Northumbria (d. 1073x5)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 27 Sept 2017. WikiTree should not ignore such a scholarly work.

On 24 Feb 2017 at 21:24 GMT Marty Ormond wrote:

I'm going to give a heads up on another change on this profile page. It is a non genealogy change.

One of the thoughtful and very well versed Scottish history resources in the community brought attention to the fact that graphic Dunbar-918 doesn't fit with the timeframe of Gospatric Dunbar-27, and it isnt compatible with standards for display of family Arms.

Lets find some other options for the principal founder of the Clan/House of Dunbar.

as of this date I am going to remove graphic image Dunbar- 918 from Gospatric. The graphic remains in the Wikitree library

On 20 Feb 2017 at 23:32 GMT Marty Ormond wrote:

I have posted a new important narrative on the G2G Forum regarding Gospatric Dunbar-27 Call for comments.

I particularly hope that Managers and other Trusted parties will be part of the discussion or at least lurking and looking. Changes here specifically about Waltheof are quite minor and can be reversed, expanded, improved. email me or post your thoughts on the community forum. Lots of other work, is the long term forecast. nothing is ever perfect, continuous improvement is my goal.

On 17 Feb 2017 at 23:43 GMT Marty Ormond wrote:

We do want the merge of Unknown-280530 into Dunbar-27.

It needs to be set up so that it goes into Dunbar-27.

I had put myself on as temporary manager of the Unknown just so that we could get rid of this unnecessary profile thru a merge,

Thanks for getting this done

On 8 Feb 2017 at 16:46 GMT Paul Lee wrote:

Unknown-280530 and Dunbar-27 do not represent the same person because: these 2 profiles look like father + son, date of death is 3 decades apart

On 6 Feb 2017 at 09:41 GMT Marty Ormond wrote:

I agree that the Gospatric unknown has almost no contradictory Bio info nor dates.

However the children may be duplicated or not justified on this tree after we look at it. Waltheof on the Unkown has a birth date as does Eadwulf Rus. We may eliminate Eadwulf Rus. He would be a different timeline. sources such as the Neil McGuigan Thesis, that reveiws many historic Northumberland Cumberland Allerdale documents and significant lesser kings or dukes or other title holders. ie "The identity of Gospatric in the writ may be debated because no patronymic, but geography and chronology point overwhelmingly to Gospatric son of Maldred, who fathered Dolfin,Waltheof,& a younger Gospatric. The first, his eldest son, appears to have ruled in Carlisle when he was expelled by WilliamRufus in 1092.

On 5 Feb 2017 at 21:07 GMT Marty (Lenover) Acks wrote:

Unknown-280530 and Dunbar-27 appear to represent the same person because: The merging from profile has same is a small segment of 9 profiles that match profiles in the fuller tree of Dunbar-27.

On 11 Mar 2016 at 03:40 GMT Marty Ormond wrote:

Treehouse G2G discussion thread started Mar 10 2016, You can see the little star and link top right of this Profile.

http://www.wikitree.com/g2g/228261?show=228506#c228506

more comments

Gospatric I is 29 degrees from Cari Starosta, 21 degrees from Marie-Antoinette d'Autriche and 14 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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Categories: Kingdom of Northumbria | Earls of Northumbria | Earls of Dunbar | Clan Dunbar