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Thomas Dungan Sr. (1635 - 1688)

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Reverend Thomas Dungan Sr.
Born in London, Middlesex, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married about 1663 in Newport, Rhode Islandmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Cold Spring, Fall Township, Bucks, Pennsylvaniamap
Profile last modified 19 Apr 2018 | Created 14 Sep 2010
This page has been accessed 3,886 times.

 

Contents

Biography

Rev. Thomas Dungan, soldier, legislator, pioneer, became the first Baptist minister in the Province of Pennsylvania.

Thomas was baptized on 13 Feb 1635 at St. Martin in the Fields in London, England, son of William Dungan and Frances Latham.

He immigrated to America in 1637 to Newport, Rhode Island, arriving with his mother and stepfather, Capt. Jeremy Clarke. He first appears on record there, in a "Roule of ye ffreemen of ye Colonie for everie Towne of the year 1655."

At the court of election held 20 May 1656 at Portsmouth, he was elected a freeman.

He was Sergeant of the Newport Militia Newport, R.I. in 1676. He acquired 240 acres at Shrewsbury, New Jersey, about the year 1670. In 1678 and again in 1681 he was elected to the Rhode Island Assembly. His half brother Walter Clarke was then Deputy Governor of Rhode Island.

In 1682 he sold his estate of 100 acres in East Greenwich, R. I., and his Newport homestead of 50 acres and, having completed his education for the ministry, he shortly thereafter removed to Pennsylvania and settled at Cold Spring, Bucks County, where he founded a Baptist Church in 1684, the first of its denomination in Pennsylvania, and continued as its pastor until his death in 1687.

Shortly after the English settled in Monmouth Co., New Jersey, he acquired lands there which he sold in 1674 according to Col. Leach. In 1677 he was one of the patentees named in the charter of East Greenwich and in 1678 he was elected a deputy to the General Assembly. He was re-elected to this body in 1681, the year in which William Penn's charter was granted, an event which attracted much attention in the other colonies. Although the majority of the colonists of Penn's settlement were Quakers, there were also many Baptists, and Mr. Dungan decided to remove thither. He conveyed his estate of 100 acres in East Greenwich by deed of gift dated June 28, 1682, to Thomas Weaver whom he called his "cousin," which in those days almost invariably signified nephew or niece, and he sold to John Bailey his Newport homestead of 50 acres by deed dated Sept. 25, 1682. Shortly afterward he removed to Pennsylvania and settled in Bucks County at Cold Spring, on the Delaware river, where he founded a Baptist Church, the first in that colony, of which he was the pastor. He continued in this service until his death in 1687.

Will

The will of Thomas Dungan, of Coldspring, County of Bucks, dated December 3, 1686, pr. Nov. 24, 1687, and recorded Feb. 1, 1688, mentions wife to whom he left all household goods, as Linnen, wooling, Bedding, brass, pewter; "only my son Clement, his bed, my daughter Maries' Bed and two brass Kettles excepted." Wife Elizabeth, sole extx. Mentions 3 sons: Thomas, Jeremiah & John. Daus. Elizabeth West, Mary, Rebecka, and Sarah Dungan. Sons William & Clement. Wit: Arthur Cooke, John Cook, Wm. Dungan. Appraisal made 12th month, 4th day, 1687 by Edmond Lovet and Abraham Cox.

To my wife, my house and considering her natural life for the bringing up of my children, and after her death, to my three sons: Thomas, Jeremiah, and John, to be divided by honest men chosen by them; or if my wife wishes to sell the house and lands, she to have one third and other two thirds to my sons: Thomas, Jeremiah and John; they paying each to their sisters, Mary, Rebecka and Sarah Dungan £5 each. To sons William and Clement, and daughter Elizabeth West, each five shillings. Wife to be sole executrix.

Signed with his mark. Witnesses: Arthur Cooke, John Cooke, Will. Dungan.

Administration granted to Elizabeth Dungan, widow, 11/13/1687. Inventory made by Edmond Lovet and Abraham Cox 12/4/1687. . Total £67; 1; 0. .

(Another note states that the will was probated 29 February 1688.)

Thomas Dungan

Rev. Thomas Dungan was the youngest child of William Dungan and Frances Lathom. His father died, and his mother came to America with her second husband Jeremy Clarke and four young children by her first marriage.

ARMS-Azure, six plates, three, two and one; on a chief or, a demi-lion rampant gules.

CREST- An orb argent banded and surmounted by a cross pattée or.

(Burke, "General Armory").

Rev. Thomas Dungan, soldier, legislator, pioneer, became the first Baptist minister in the Province of Pennsylvania, having been born probably in London about 1634, and came to New England with his mother about 1637.

As early as 1655 he was living at Newport, R. I., where he was Sergeant of the Newport Militia in 1676. He acquired 240 acres at Shrewsbury, New Jersey, about the year 1670. In 1678 and again in 1681 he was elected to the Rhode Island Assembly. His half brother Walter Clarke was then Deputy Governor of Rhode Island.

In 1682 he sold his estate of 100 acres in East Greenwich, R. I., and his Newport homestead of 50 acres and, having completed his education for the ministry, he shortly thereafter removed to Pennsylvania and settled at Cold Spring, Bucks County, where he founded a Baptist Church in 1684, the first of its denomination in Pennsylvania, and continued as its pastor until his death in 1687.

He married at Newport about 1663 Elizabeth, daughter of Sgt. Clement Weaver, She was born in 1647 and died at Cold Spring in 1697. His Will, probated 29 February 1688, is one of the earliest on record in Bucks County.

Rev. Thomas Dungan and Elizabeth Weaver are buried in the graveyard of the Cold Spring Church. They were the parents of five sons and four daughters, all born in Rhode Island:

  • William Dungan, married Deborah Wing.
  • Elizabeth Dungan, married to Nathaniel West, Jr.
  • John Dungan, died without issue.
  • Clement Dungan, died without issue.
  • Rebecca Dungan, married to Edward Doyle.
  • Thomas Dungan, Jr., married Mary Drake
  • Jeremiah Dungan, married Deborah Drake.
  • Mary Dungan, married to Abraham Richards.
  • Sarah Dungan, married to James Carrell.

John S. Wurts, Magna Charta, Brookfield Pub. Co., Philadelphia, 1945, Part III, p. 437, 453-454.

Wilfred Jordan, Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, Lewis Historical Publishing Co., New York, 1942, pp. 671; Coat of Arms facing p. 663.

Note

Rev Thomas Dungan. Immigrated from England to Rhode Island with his mother and step-father, Jeremiah Clark in 1637. He removed with a colony of Welsh Baptists from Rhode Island to Bucks County, Pennsylvania in 1682 and established the first Baptist church in Pennsylvania. The Dungan genealogy was traced by researchers in the early 1900's back to Emperor Charlemagne, 800 A.D.

Thomas Dungan was the youngest son of Frances Latham and William Dungan. His father died, and his mother came to America with her second husband Jeremy Clarke and her four young children.

Sources

  • History of Bucks County, PA, Volume I, Bucks County Genealogies, page 207
  • New England Irish Pioneers [database online]. Orem, Utah: Ancestry, Inc., 1997. Original data: O'Brien, Michael J., LL.D. Pioneer Irish in New England. New York, NY: P. J. Kennedy & Sons, 1937.
  • "Descendants of East Tennessee Pioneers", written by Olga Jones (Wear)Edwards and Ina Wear Roberts. (2nd edition)
  • Will Book A, Vol 1, p. 36
  • www.findagrave.com/Cold Springs Church Cemetery, Bucks County, PA


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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Thomas by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Thomas:

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Thomas is 14 degrees from Carroll Shelby, 22 degrees from Joan Whitaker and 11 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.