Thomas Ellis MD

Thomas Oliver Ellis MD (1808 - 1879)

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Rev Thomas Oliver Ellis MD
Born in Perry, Missourimap
Ancestors ancestors
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married in Cape Girardeau Co. MOmap
Husband of — married in Tippah County, Mississippimap
Descendants descendants
Died in Centerville, Fresno, Californiamap
Profile last modified | Created 19 Feb 2017
This page has been accessed 282 times.

Biography

According to one source, after T.O. Ellis’ mother died, his father left him and his two sisters to be raised by his uncle, William Gilliam and his wife Charlotte Fisher, while he (Josiah Shelton Ellis) fought in the War of 1812.[1]

As a young man, T.O. "attended Mount Pleasant Academy, professed religion and joined the Methodist Church, for this cause his Father disinherited him and drove him from home." His father was living in Tennessee at the time. T.O. became a minister and a school teacher at the age of 19.[2] He married Sarah Babb in 1830 in Missouri and the ceremony was performed by Rev. John Scripps, a well-known Methodist minister.[3] In 1834 he was living in Washington County, IL, where his son William Josiah was born.[4] According to one family history, at about this time he wrote his father "a good long Religious letter, on the receipt of which his father leaped from his bed, (he had not walked for many months), and ran through the Streets of the town in which he lived, crying at the top of his voice, "Tom had Religion," and that he would give the last Negro he had to see Tom. He ordered his "Will and Testament" to be changed and wrote for Thomas to come home, that he might see him once more before he died. Thomas Oliver hastened to see his father, but Death had done its work before he arrived. The news that his father had forgiven him, and of his complete reconciliation and his great desire to see him, so pleased Thomas Oliver that he refused to allow the Will to be changed."[2]

Sarah died in 1836 and in 1837, Thomas married Elizabeth Long. As an itinerant preacher, he was sent to the Mississippi Swamps when the notorious bandit John St. Murrell was active the area. By 1838, the family had relocated to Tippah County, Mississippi. T.O. studied medicine under Dr. Dyer around this time and continued to be active as a preacher. He became an ordained deacon on 6 Nov 1842 at Holly Springs, Mississippi, associated with the Memphis Conference of the Methodist Church, which allowed him to administer baptism, marriage and burial rites in the absence of an elder.[2] In one history of the area, a physician named Ellis was noted to be living in the hills near Orizaba, Tippah County but it is uncertain if this is T.O. Ellis.[5] Ellis completed his medical studies in 1846 and moved to Upshur County, TX[4] where he is found in the tax rolls of 1847, owning no land, but having horses, cattle, hogs and professional instruments valued at $237.[6]

By 1848, he owned 320 acres in Upshur County which was first granted to M.D. Greer.[7] His half-brother George was also noted in the tax rolls of Upshur County. T.O. became a church elder in 1848.[2] In 1849, Ellis owned land, 3 horses, 18 head of cattle and hogs valued at $725.[8] At the time of the 1850 census, his stepson, V.R.B. Gray, age 18 and a physician named N.or A. B. Ellis were living with the family[9] and he is still found in the tax rolls, with the addition of a wagon and watch as miscellaneous property.[10] The tax rolls of 1851 show a drop in value and the cattle and hogs are not listed. The property is noted to be located on Sabine Stream.[11]

In 1852 the family relocated to Smith County[4] but still owned the land in Upshur County, possibly as late as 1856.[12] On the 30th Aug 1853, T.O. Ellis was appointed a trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South in Tyler, TX.[13]

On the 2nd of January 1854, T.O. Ellis & bro. wrote a promissory note to Harvey Lindsey or bearer for $350 for a house and lot in Tyler. (This was in Block 7 adjoining the town square and appears to have been a drug store).[14] Eleven days later, T.O. Ellis and brother purchased 42 acres from Benjamin Scott (which was sold in 1856 to R.B. Long).[15] The Ellis family appears in the 1854 census of Smith county school children[16] and T.O. Ellis received 13 votes for school trustee in the 1854 election returns.[17] T.O. also appears in the tax assessor rolls owning two lots in Block 2 valued at $238 and T.O. Ellis and brother have merchandise valued at $500.[18] The following year was troublesome. Harvey Lindsey had sold the promissory note for the drug store to F.J. Ham, a land trader. When the Ellis’ failed to pay up on the note, Ham sued, and George Ellis was served with papers. T.O. Ellis was never served. George’s statement is difficult to read, but since he didn’t sign the promissory note, he probably wasn’t inclined to pay it. George was ordered to pay Ham $359 and the lot was sold.[14] T.O. Ellis appears as delinquent for 1854 taxes in 1855.[19]

At about this time the family moved to Parker County, Texas[4] where T.O. Ellis and his son, William Josiah, filed for land. The Butterfield stage route had opened up the western part of Texas, and settlers began to move there in hopes of avoiding malaria in the east.[20] T.O. was one of the founding members of the Goshen Methodist Church.[21] [22] The Rev. Pleasant Tackitt related that the church was held in a log cabin built by Mr. Eubanks. Tackitt recalled T.O. Ellis in his memoirs, and noted that in 1855, Parker County was “rich and waving grass was green and velvety...the buffalo had moved a little farther west. The different tribes of Indians were under treaty...there was no hostile foe to molest or disturb the peace of the family. The beautiful running streams of clear, pure water, the grand and noble forests...”[23] T.O. Ellis is found in the Parker Co. tax rolls owning 160 acres in 1856.[24]

Court records of Smith County, TX, indicate that in the fall term of 1856, Thomas Ellis (indexed as T.C. Ellis) of Parker County and John McKinley were delinquent on a promissory note to Thomas Hayes in the amount of $111.42. The debt was incurred in 20 Nov 1854 in Smith County for merchandise “for the benefit of my (T.O. Ellis) family.” It was to have been paid by the first of January. One payment of $20.40 was made in 1855, and three additional payments were made in 1856, including one payment made in $10.00 of pork. A summons to court was delivered to T.O. Ellis on 31 Jan 1857.[25] The case was dismissed on 16 Jun 1857,[26] likely because the Ellis family no longer lived in Smith County.

On April 7, 1857, T.O. Ellis and his family and his son William Josiah and his wife and baby began their journey across the plains in a covered wagon to California. They traveled in a large train via the Southern Route. In November they arrived at El Monte, Los Angeles County.[4] [27]  The Southern Route probably went through Dallas, Waco, Odessa, and El Paso in Texas, then into Mexico at Chihuahua to Casas Grandes, Coralitos, Janos and Guadalupe Pass to Agua Prieta, Santa Cruz and Tubac, up into Tucson and to the Gila River, then down to Yuma and to Chino Ranch in California.[28] Family records substantiate this route and includes a mention of Warner’s Ranch after Yuma.[29][30]

T.O. Ellis was appointed Presiding Elder of the Los Angeles District in 1858, but was discontinued from that post at his own request in 1860, likely due to the relocation to Tulare County. He served in Los Angeles and El Monte before the move.[31][32]  [33] It is possible that Ellis’ moves were partially inspired by his contacts in the Methodist church. Orceneth Fisher, a Methodist minister and officer lived in Washington County, Illinois in the 1830’s, in Texas from 1839-1855 and transferred to California in 1855.[34] Ellis lived in Illinois in the 1830’s, moved to Texas about 1846 and left for California in 1857.[4]

By the time of the 1860 census, the family had settled in Visalia, Tulare County, CA.[35] T.O. was active in the ministry at this time, performing marriages in the area.[36] [37]  T.O. stated that he came to California to preach the gospel, and he was appointed Assistant Preacher in Visalia and King's River Circuit of the Methodist Church in 1863.[38] He also served on the board of the Visalia Select Seminary and was elected Superintendent of Schools in 1862 after having been appointed to fill a vacancy.[39] [40] He did not complete his term because the family relocated to San Luis Obispo in 1863.[38] While in Visalia, he opened a medical practice.[41] [42] Visalia was a turbulent town during the Civil War. T.O. Ellis testified in the trial of Senator Thomas Baker, who was charged with treason for expressing his anti-Union sentiments in a speech given at the Methodist Church.[43] The Ellis family sympathized with the South during the Civil War and likely left Visalia due to their political position.[44] A newspaper article of the time noted that Rev. T.O. Ellis preached a proper sermon, and then turned the pulpit over to a Rev Webb who preached an abolition prayer, which emptied half the pews.[45]

The family lived in San Luis Obispo from August to Sept 1863. T.O. hints at a difficult relationship with his eldest son, W.J. Ellis in several of his letters. It sounds as if W.J. had been marked for revenge, perhaps over financial or political matters, as they wish to keep the proposed sale of their property secret. He was also avoiding the military draft. The two families (W.J. and T. O.) lived on adjoining property on 160 acres near the American Graveyard. T.O. wrote that the land was 1200 yards south of San Luis Obispo, and 9 miles north of the ocean. He reported that they lived at the Sacket place, a house with 3 rooms and there were 30 acres in crop. Four of his daughters were not living at home at this time. T.O. maintained some interest in the claims that his son-in-law, W.H. Davis, mined. The family left San Luis Obispo and lived briefly in Hornitos, Mariposa County, and a letter written in 1864, refers to the children having been vaccinated. His youngest son, Robert Lee, was born in Hornitos.[46]

The family settled at King's River in 1866 and T.O. Ellis filed for a homestead on 3 April of that year.[47] The Ellis home was on 160 acres, 3 miles from Centerville, Fresno County. They had cattle, poultry and acres of fruit trees. To support themselves, they sold produce as well as having some income from the medical practice.[48] The town of Centerville was founded as a result of frequent flooding along the Kings River. An earlier settlement, Scottsburg, had been located closer to the river.[49] Dr. Ellis held religious meetings as well as filling in for other ministers. In 1866 T.O. wrote, “We have had a glorious Camp meeting with 29 accessions to our Church. It was a good time. I never saw a Revival I had more confidence in than this.” In the same letter he complained about the hogs getting his corn.[50]

In January of 1867, T.O. Ellis was quite ill and it was thought he would die. A letter describes a serious bout with “Quinsy” or tonsillitis, and an abscess. He directed other physicians in his own care.[51] A W. E. Ellis, physician and clergyman is listed in the 1867 Business Directory of Centerville, Fresno Co., CA.[52]

T.O. Ellis was elected superintendent of Fresno schools sometime before 1868. In his yearly report to the State Superintendent of Schools (O.P. Fitzgerald, an old colleague from the Methodist church), he included a four page letter describing the status of education in Fresno County. His salary was $250/yr. Ellis was very fond of orthography (spelling) and lectured to other teachers about it during the teacher’s institute, and promoted the cause of more orthographic instruction and expresses his dismay over the change of textbooks.[53] He continued as superintendent of Fresno County Schools in 1869.[54] He apparently lost the next election, as Mr. S. H. Hill is the superintendent in 1870. Hill comments that his predecessor had made promises but failed to assist the Alabama school district in their organization. T.O. Ellis is now listed as holding a teaching certificate in the reports for 1870 and 1871, during Mr. Hill’s tenure.[55][56]

In April of 1871 Ellis proved up on the land he homesteaded under the Homestead Act of 1862. His two witnesses attested to the fact that there was a home, corrals, a well, smoke house and orchard on the property and that the family had lived there for five years.[47] He received the certificate in June of 1872.[57]

T.O. Ellis resumed the superintendent’s office for the 1871-1872 school year. He refers to Mr. Hill as his “honorable predecessor.” He also used the report to point out the superintendent’s salary ($600/yr) is less than the male teachers of the district are paid and the superintendent is also required to hold a teacher’s certificate. He lists October 15 of 1869 as the day he received his teacher’s certificate. He also requested that the State Superintendent favor them with a visit during their upcoming teacher’s institute.[58] In the following year, the request was fulfilled, and T.O. Ellis praised the event highly, particularly the new methods of instruction that were described. The salary was also raised to $900 for the year. In this report he also requested that a law authorizing boarding schools for the Indian and colored children of the county be passed, since they are too scattered about to provide adequate education. He also favored a more equal apportionment of school support, since some districts could afford 8 months of school and others only five.[59]

Ellis continued as superintendent in 1874 and 1875 although some pages of the reports from 1873-1875 are not written in his hand. He noted in his report of 1875 that he was dangerously ill for three months and unable to hold a teacher’s institute. He again requested efforts to reform the monetary support for the schools.[60] [61] This was apparently his final year as superintendent.

In 1876, he sold 2 5/8 acres to AM Turpin.[62] Ellis sold 80 acres to H.D.Silverman in April of 1877.[63] A patent is noted to be at the land office for Thos. O. Ellis in the 6 Jun 1877 Fresno paper.[64]

T.O. Ellis remained involved in the Methodist Church, participating in the District Conferences.[65] He also continued to perform marriages, including one at his home in Dec of 1876.[66] In February of 1879, the Fresno Expositor reported that he had returned to his home on the King’s River after living in Fresno for three months.[67] HIs daughter, Elizabeth, died in October of 1878 in Fresno. He was also delinquent in his taxes in the same issue of the paper.[68] He preached his last sermon the Sunday before he was confined to bed with the illness that would take his life. He died in 1879 of erysipelas (a streptococcal infection). [2] [69]

Sources

  1. “Letter from Howard Sisk to Connie Davis,” 5 Apr 1996, original, no source documentation included.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 "A Genealogical Record of the Ellis Family, a portion of which is from a memorandum of the family prepared by Col. Thomas Harding Ellis of Richmond, VA in 1849, with additional notes pertaining to the Ellis-Gilliam and Ellis-Long families" 34 pages, 1912, photocopy held in 1996 by Davis-50681.
  3. “Marriage of Thomas O. Ellis to Sarah Gray,” 22 Jul 1830, Cape Girardeau Co., MO, Book A, page 72, photocopy, provided to Davis-50681, 4 Feb 1999 by county recorder. Also found in Missouri Marriages before 1840 compiled by Susan Ormesher, Genealogical Publishing House, Baltimore, 1982.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 "William Josiah Ellis" Memorial and Biographical History of the Counties of Fresno, Tulare, and Kern, California, Lewis, 1891,p. 341.
  5. Rowland, Dunbar, History of Mississippi, the Heart of the South, II, 835-837, SJ Clarke Publishing Co., Chicago, IL, 1925, photocopied by Connie Davis at the Library of Congress Genealogy Reading Room, Washington DC, 25 Jan 1999.
  6. “Tax List,” Upshur Co., TX, 1847, pages 2-4, photocopy of microfilm made 21 Jul 1999, held by Tyler Public Library, Smith Co., TX.
  7. “Tax List,” Upshur Co., TX, 1848, page 4, photocopy of microfilm made 21 Jul 1999, held by Tyler Public Library, Smith Co., TX.
  8. “Tax List,” Upshur Co., TX, 1849, page 4, photocopy of microfilm made 21 Jul 1999, Tyler Public Library, Smith Co., TX.
  9. “Ellis households 1850 US Census,” Upshur County, TX, family number 332, p. 202, 13 Dec 1850, photocopy of microfilm M432 roll 916.
  10. “Tax List,” Upshur Co., TX, 1850, page 4, photocopy of microfilm made 21 Jul 1999, held by Tyler Public Library, Smith Co., TX.
  11. “Tax List,” Upshur Co,, TX, 1851, register unknown, page 5, photocopy of microfilm made 21 Jul 1999, held by Tyler Public Library, Smith Co., TX.
  12. “Tax List,” Upshur Co., TX, 1852, unknown register, page 6, photocopy of microfilm made 21 Jul 1999, held by Tyler Public Library, Smith Co., TX.
  13. “Hamilton appoints trustees,” 30 Aug 1853, Book F, page 94, photocopied 21 Jul 1999, held by Smith Co. TX Clerk’s office.
  14. 14.0 14.1 “F.J. Ham vs. T.O. Ellis and G. L. Ellis,” 16 May 1855, Case 410, photocopied 21 Jul 1999, held in Smith Co., TX archives.
  15. “T. O. Ellis and bro to R. B. Long,” 1 Aug 1856, Book H, page 363, photocopied 21 Jul 1999, Smith Co., TX Clerk’s Office.
  16. Texas Scholastics 1854-1855: A State Census of School Children, page 338, White, Gifford, Heritage Books, 1991, Library of Congress, Family History and Genealogy Room, photocopied by Connie Davis 25 Jan 1999.
  17. “Smith County School Trustee Election Returns,” East Texas Family Records, copied by Loyd Burks, Vol. 6, No. 2, Summer 1982, photocopy provided by the Texas Conference of the United Methodist Church 26 Jan 1999.
  18. “Tax Assessment,” Smith Co., TX, 1854, photocopy made 21 Jul 1999 from microfilm of page A, Tyler Public Library, Smith Co., TX.
  19. “Delinquent tax roll,” 1 Sep 1855, Book H, p. 343 photocopied 21 Jul 1999, held at Smith Co., TX Clerk’s Office.
  20. Parker County Historical Commission, History of Parker County (Texas), Taylor Publishing, Dallas, 1980, held in 2000 by Weatherford Public Library, Parker Co, TX.
  21. historical marker, “Goshen Methodist Church organized 1854,” photographed by Connie Davis, 11 Jan 2000.
  22. H. Smythe, Historical Sketch of Parker County and Weatherford Texas, Lavat, St. Louis, MO, 1877, held in 2000 by Weatherford Public Library, Parker Co., TX.
  23. “Rev. Pleasant Tackitt,” Weatherford Times, Weatherford, Parker Co., TX, 27 Mar 1886, reprinted, held by Weatherford Public Library, Weatherford, TX 11 Jan 2000.
  24. “Tax Assessment,” Parker Co., TX, 1856, unknown register, page A, photocopy of microfilm, held by Weatherford Public Library, Parker Co., TX.
  25. “Thomas J. Hayes vs. T.O. Ellis and J.N. McKinley,,” 12 Dec 1856 and 15 Jan 1857, Smith County Court Records, Smith County, TX, Book C, case no. 566,, Photocopies received from county clerk 30 Oct 1998.
  26. “T. J. Hayes vs. T. O. Ellis & J. W. McKinly,” 16 Jun 1857, Volume C, p. 360 photocopied 21 Jul 1999, held at Smith Co., TX Archives of District Court.
  27. A Genealogical Record of the Ellis Family, a portion of which is from a memorandum of the family prepared by Col. Thomas Harding Ellis of Richmond, VA in 1849, with additional notes pertaining to the Ellis-Gilliam and Ellis-Long families by Sarah Jane Ellis Davis, 34 pages, 1912, photocopy held in 1996 by Connie Davis.
  28. Bob Norris, ““Southern Route to CA”,” 10 and 11 Mar 1998.
  29. 13 Jan 2000, “TO Ellis and William Josiah Ellis, Native Daughters of the Golden West records,” held at California Genealogical Society, 1611 Telegraph Ave, Ste. 200, Oakland, CA, partial transcription of records 33-155 and 33-156 provided by Georgie Searles.
  30. “Dr. Thomas Oliver Ellis,” after 1924, Native Daughters of the Golden West Pioneer List, page 155, by Leila Stone, roll 20, MF 278, photocopied at Sutro Library, San Francisco, CA 5 Dec 2000.
  31. “Minutes of the Tenth Regular Session of the Pacific Annual Conference of the Methodist Church, South,” San Francisco: Towne and Bacon, 1860, photocopied 25 Mar 1999, held by the archives of the Pacific School of Religion, 1798 Scenic Ave., Berkeley CA.
  32. Simmons, Rev. J.C., History of Southern Methodism on the Pacific Coast, Southern Methodist Publishing House, Nashville, TN, 1886, held in the archives of the Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, CA photocopied 25 Mar 1999.
  33. Leon L. Loofbourow, Cross in the Sun, Vol. I, 205, Historical Society of the California-Nevada Annual Conference, San Francisco, CA, 1966, held in 1999 at the Flora Lawson Hewlett Library, Graduate Theological Union, 2400 Ridge Rd., Berkeley, CA.
  34. Macum Phelan, A History of Methodism in Texas, 1817-1866, Cokesbury Press, Nashville, 1924, held in 200 at the Wesleyan Methodist University library, Fort Worth, TX.
  35. “Thomas Ellis household, 1860 U.S. census,” Tulare County, CA, Township No. 2, pages 6 & 7, Visalia Post Office, enumerated 27 Jun 1860, microfilm M653 roll 71
  36. “Marriage certificate of Robert M. Work and Polly Ann Work,” 17 May 1860, Visalia, Tulare Co., CA, page 23, book of records.
  37. “Hymeneal,” Visalia Delta, Tulare Co, CA, 20 Oct 1860, p. 2, photocopy of microfilm made May 1999, California State Library.
  38. 38.0 38.1 19 Jan 1863, “letter from T. O. Ellis, Visalia, Tulare Co., CA to W. H. and S. J. Davis,” photocopy held in 1993 by Connie Davis.
  39. “Tulare County Election Returns,” Visalia Delta, Tulare Co., CA, 18 Sep 1862, p.2, microfilm photocopied May 1999, California State Library.
  40. Untitled notice in Visalia Weekly Delta, Visalia, Tulare Co., CA, 14 Nov 1861, digital copy, Fresno Library, Fresno Co., CA.
  41. “Visalia Business Directory,” Visalia Delta, Tulare Co., CA, 8 Aug 1861, p. 3, photocopy of microfilm made May 1999, held by California State Library.
  42. “Dr. T. O. Ellis, Sen. Advertisement,” Visalia Equal Rights Expositor, Visalia, Tulare Co., CA, 7 Sep 1862, digital copy, Fresno Public Library.
  43. “Trial of Col. Baker,” Equal Rights Expositor, Visalia, Tulare Co., CA, 8 Nov 1862, p. 2, photocopy of Microfilm made 1 May 1999, held in 1999 by California State History Room, California State Library.
  44. 21 Sep 1863, “letter from TO Ellis, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo Co., CA to WH Davis,” photocopy held in 1993 by Connie Davis.
  45. 1418. “Abolition Prayer,” Visalia Equal Rights Expositor, Visalia, Tulare Co., CA, 5 Mar 1863, from microfilm 25 Aug 2012, Fresno Library.
  46. "The Country is Healthy, and Religion Desirable: The Letters of Rev. Thomas Oliver Ellis, MD, 1863-1867" transcribed and annotated by Connie LaVon Davis, Dec, 1999. Available from Davis-50681.
  47. 47.0 47.1 “Thomas O. Ellis homestead application,” File no. 78, Application 252, Visalia Land Office, filed 3 Apr 1866, proved 14 Apr 1871, NARA, Washington DC, record group 49, Bureau of Land Management, photocopied 18 Feb 2000.
  48. “Fresno Memories: Madame Ellis,” Ernestine Winchell, Fresno Weekly Republican (or Bee, or Morning Republican), v, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 18 Oct 1931, p. 4, clipping provided by Edna Davis (photo of Mrs. Ellis is noted to appear on page 8B, but was not found with clipping), inherited in 1994 by Connie Davis.
  49. “Scottsburg Folk, Tired of Floods, Founded Centerville,” James Dufur, Fresno Bee, Fresno Co., CA, 19 Feb 1956, unknown page, photocopy provided April 1999 by Georgie Searles.
  50. 317. “letter from T.O. Ellis to William Davis from Centerville,” 6 Oct 1866, photocopy held by Connie Davis.
  51. “letter from T.O. Ellis to William and Jane Davis from Millerton,” 9 Jan 1867, original held by Valerie Whelan, photocopy held by Connie Davis.
  52. The Pacific Coast Business Directory for 1867, Henry Langley: San Francisco, 1867, photopied at Oakland Public Library 25 Mar 1999.
  53. “Common School Reports,” 1867-1868, Fresno Co., CA, MF 2:10(12), roll 2, photocopy of microfilm, held at California State Archives, 1020 O St., Sacramento, CA.
  54. “Common School Reports,” 1868-1869, Fresno Co., CA, MF 2:10(12), roll 2, photocopy of microfilm, held at California State Archives, 1020 O St., Sacramento, CA.
  55. “Common School Reports,” 1869-1870, Fresno Co., CA, MF 2:10(13), roll 3, photocopy of microfilm, held at California State Archives, 1020 O St., Sacramento, CA.
  56. “Common School Reports,” 1870-1871, Fresno Co., CA, MF 2:10(13), roll 3, photocopy of microfilm, held at California State Archives, 1020 O St., Sacramento, CA.
  57. “Homestead Certificate No. 78, Application no. 252, Thomas O. Ellis,” 1 Jun 1872, Vol. 2, Page 14, Visalia, Tulare Co., California Land Office, photocopy received 22 Feb 1999.
  58. “Common School Reports,” 1871-1872, Fresno Co., CA, MF 2:10(14), roll 4, photocopy of microfilm, held at California State Archives, 1020 O St., Sacramento, CA.
  59. “Common School Reports,” 1872-1873, Fresno Co., CA, MF 2:10 (14), roll 4, photocopy of microfilm, held at California State Archives, 1020 O St., Sacramento, CA.
  60. “Common School Reports,” 1873-1874, Fresno Co., CA, MF 2:10(15), roll 5, photocopy of microfilm, held at California State Archives, 1020 O St., Sacramento, CA.
  61. “Common School Reports,” 1874-1875, Fresno Co., CA, MF 2:10(15), roll 5, photocopy of microfilm, held at California State Archives, 1020 O St., Sacramento, CA.
  62. “Land Transactions,” Fresno Weekly Expositor, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 17 Apr 1876, p. 3, col 2, photocopy of microfilm, held by California State Library.
  63. “Real Estate Transactions,” Fresno Weekly Expositor, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 18 Apr 1877, p. 3, col 1, photocopy from microfilm, held by California State library.
  64. “Patents Uncalled for at the Visalia Land Office,” Fresno Weekly Expositor, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 6 Jun 1877, p. 3, col. 2, microfilm, held by California State Library.
  65. Minutes of the District Conference for Visalia, Pacific Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Vol I., 1872-1875, held at the Archives of the California-Nevada Conference of the Methodist Church, Pacific School of Religion 1798 Scenic Ave., Berkeley, CA.
  66. “Married,” Fresno Weekly Expositor, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 6 Dec 1876, p. 2, col. 6, photocopy of microfilm, held by California State Library.
  67. “Dr. T.O. Ellis, Sr..,” Fresno Expositor, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 5 Feb 1879, p. 3, col. 1, photocopy of microfilm held by California State Library.
  68. “Tax List,” Fresno Expositor, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 5 Mar 1879, p. 1, col. 5, photocopy of microfilm held by California State Library.
  69. Death of Dr. Ellis,” Fresno Weekly Expositor, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 13 Sep 1879, p. 3, col. 1.

Additional Sources

  • “Rev Dr TO ELLIS marker,” Mt View (Belmont) cemetery, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA.
  • “Ellis household, 1840 US Census,” DeSoto Co., MS, 1840.
  • “Ellis households 1850 US Census,” Upshur County, TX, family number 332, p. 202, 13 Dec 1850, photocopy of microfilm M432 roll 916.
  • “Thomas Ellis household, 1860 U.S. census,” Tulare County, CA, Township No. 2, pages 6 & 7, Visalia Post Office, enumerated 27 Jun 1860, microfilm M653 roll 71.
  • “Tho. O. Ellis household, 1870 U.S. census,” Kings River P.O., Township No. 3, Fresno Co., CA, 1870, microfilm M593, roll 72, p. 19, line 33.
  • “Fresno Memories: Dr. Ellis,” Ernestine Winchell, Fresno Morning Republican, Fresno, Fresno Co., CA, 11 Oct 1931.
  • “At an election held..,” Visalia Weekly Delta, Visalia, Tulare Co., CA, 25 Dec 1862.


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Images: 3
Rev. T.O. Ellis ca 1870
Rev. T.O. Ellis ca 1870

Rev. T.O. Ellis MD ca 1870
Rev. T.O. Ellis MD ca 1870

Rev. T.O. Ellis MD ca 1870
Rev. T.O. Ellis MD ca 1870

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