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Hannah (Endicott) Treadwell (abt. 1727 - 1792)

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Hannah Treadwell formerly Endicott aka Endecot
Born about [location unknown]
Daughter of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Wife of — married after 28 Jul 1750 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusettsmap
[children unknown]
Died in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, United Statesmap
Profile last modified 23 Jun 2019 | Created 9 Jun 2019
This page has been accessed 33 times.

Contents

Biography

Hannah Endicott was married to Nathaniel Treadwell of Ipswich, Essex Co., Massachusetts Bay Colony, after 28 Jul 1750, when their intention to marry was published. She was referred to as "Landlady Treadwell" because she and her husband, Nathaniel, were the proprietors of the Inn in Ipswich. The lawyer, John Adams (future 2nd President of the United States) was a frequent guest at the Inn and mentioned it several times in his diaries.

Adams wrote on 22 Jun 1771, "Landlord and landlady are some of the grandest people alive; landlady is the great-granddaughter of Governor Endicott, and has all the great notions of high family that you find in Winslows, Hutchinsons, Quincys, Saltonstalls, Chandlers, Leonards, Otises and as you might find with more propriety in the Winthrops. Yet she is cautious and modest about discovering it. She is a new light; continually canting and whining in a religious strain. The Governor was uncommonly strict and devout, eminently so in his day; and his great, great-granddaughter hopes to keep up the honor of the family in hers, and distinguish herself among her contemporaries as much."

Adams also mentioned that, "The old lady has got a new copy of her great-grandfather, Governor (John) Endicott’s picture hung up in the house". It was possibly the painting later in the collection of the Essex Institute in Salem, Mass. William A. Robbins in his "Thomas Treadwell of Ipswich, Mass and Some of His Descendants" surmised that she was "probably daughter of Zerubbabel and Mary Endicott", but may have been off a generation or two. Robert Rantoul in his article about the portraits of Gov. Endecot (see notes on this page below), thought she was Hannah, the dau of the second Zerobabel, but he died in 1706 and Hannah Endicott Treadwell was not born until 1727.

She outlived her husband, Nathaniel Treadwell, and in her Will, written 1 Jan 1788, she makes bequests to her surviving step-children and grand-children.

She is buried near her husband at Highland Cemetery, Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Will

Will of Hannah (Endicott) Treadwell, 1 Jan 1788, Ipswich, Essex Co., MA[1]

In the name of God Amen I Hannah Treadwell of Ipswich in the County of Essex within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, widow, being through the goodness of God of sound mind & memory, do make and ordain this my last will and testament. And first I resign my soul to God who gave it, and my body to the dust to be buried in Christian burial at the discretion of my Executor hereafter named, in hopes of a glorious resurrection to the life eternal thro' the merits of my Savior Jesus Christ; And as to my worldly goods, I give and dispose of the same in manner following.
I give to my son in law Jacob Treadwell my great Bible.
I give to my son in law Moses Treadwell my silver tankard.
All the remainder of my Books, I give to my three sons in law Jacob Treadwell, Aaron Treadwell & Moses Treadwell to be equally divided between them.
I give to my daughter in law Elisabeth Treadwell my (Brotes?) gown, sattin cloke, sattin handkkerchief, a lawn apron, laced lawn handkerchief & black quilted Callimenco petticoat.
I give to my daughter in law Susanna Treadwell my full suit of black silk clothes, a cambrick muslin apron, a lawn handkerchief, a cinnamon col'd petticoat.
I give to Hannah Treadwell daughter of sd Jacob Treadwell my best feather bed, bedstead, cord, curtains, curtain rods and bed quilt, two of my best blankets, one pair of fine linen sheets, one pair of common sheets, my suit of damask clothes my silver teapot, six of my largest silver teaspoons, my pair of silver sugar tongs two of my largest pewter dishes and one dozen of pewter plates marked H E & also six pounds lawful silver money to be paid by my Executor in three months after my decease.
I give to my said daughters Elisabeth & Susanna all my head linen to be equally divided between them.
I give to my said daughters & to said Hannah Treadwell all the remainder of my wearing linen to be equally divided between them.
I give to Nathaniel Treadwell son of the sd Jacob Treadwell to Nathaniel Treadwell son of the said Aaron Treadwell & to Nathaniel Treadwell son of the said Moses, each the sum of thirteen pounds six shillings & eight pence lawful silver money to be paid them by my executor in three months after my decease
I give to Mary Treadwell daughter of the said Jacob my (?) gown.
I give to Hannah Treadwell daughter of said Moses Treadwell my _ patch gown five of my smallest silver tea spoons & my second best bed & curtains.
I give to Elisabeth Treadwell daughter of said Aaron Treadwell my hear in hand ring & gold buttons.
I give to Hannah Treadwell daughter of said Aaron a fringed tablecloth a pr linen sheets, one dozen damask napkins and my gold neck lace.
I give to Nabby Treadwell dau of said Moses Treadwell my stone ring and to Susanna Treadwell dau of sd Moses Treadwell a plain ring.
I give to Aaron Treadwell son of sd Aaron my silver pepper box and to Jacob Treadwell son of Jacob my silver cream pot.
I give to William, Moses & Jonathan sons of sd Moses each one large silver spoon.
I give to my said son in law Moses Treadwell my cloth riding hood and I do hereby constitute and appoint him the sd Moses sole executor of this my Last Will & Testament and do order him to pay all my just debts funeral charges & the legacies herein before mentioned out of the monies I may have on hand at my decease and that may be due to me on bond or notes of hand and I hereby give to him the sd Moses two thirds of all the money I may have on hand or that may be due to me after payment of my debts funeral charges & legacies and the one half of all the remainder of my estate of what kind so ever.
I give to sd Aaron Treadwell my son in law the one third part of all my monies on hand or that may be due to me on bond & notes of hand after payment of my just debts funeral charges & leagcies and also one half of all the remainder of my estate of what kind soever, on condition that he release & quitclaim to his Brother Moses within six months after my decease all his rights, title & interest in a certain wood lot which was husband Capt, Nathaniel Treadwell's and lies near Mr. John Folwer's but if he the said Aaron shall neglect or refuse for the space of six months after my decease to release & quit claim all his right title & interest in sd wood lot to the said Moses, then I give him the sd Moses all the monies that I may have on hand & that may be due to me on Bonds and Notes of Hand and all residue and remainder of my estate of what nature or kind so ever. In witness whereof I do hereunto set my hand & seal this first day of January anno domino 1788. - Hannah Treadwell
signed sealed & delivered by the sd Hannah Treadwell the testator to be her last will and testament in presence of us who subscribed our names as witnesses in her presence & in presence of each other. The words son, to be, & lot first interlined - Ebenezer Stanwood, Daniel Noyes, Sarah Stanwood
Accepted for probate 6 Aug 1792.

Notes

Intention to marry published 28 July 1750.

Diaries of John Adams:

https://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/adams-the-works-of-john-adams-vol-2-diary-notes-of-debates-autobiography“
June 19, 1770, Tuesday morning: “Rambled with Kent ’round Landlord Treadwell’s pastures to see how our horses fared. We found them in the grass up to their eyes–excellent pastures. This hill, on which stands the meeting-house and courthouse, is a fine elevation, and we have here a fine air and the pleasant prospect of the winding river at the foot of the hill.” He “drank balm tea at Treadwell’s” on June 21.
(https://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/archive/doc?id=D18&bc=%2Fdigitaladams%2Farchive%2Fbrowse%2Fdiaries_by_number.php)
June 22, 1771, Saturday: “Spent this week at Ipswich, in the usual labors and drudgery of attendance upon court. Boarded at Treadwell’s; have had no time to write. Landlord and landlady are some of the grandest people alive; landlady is the great-granddaughter of Governor Endicott, and has all the great notions of high family that you find in Winslows, Hutchinsons, Quincys, Saltonstalls, Chandlers, Leonards, Otises and as you might find with more propriety in the Winthrops. Yet she is cautious and modest about discovering it. She is a new light; continually canting and whining in a religious strain. The Governor was uncommonly strict and devout, eminently so in his day; and his great, great-granddaughter hopes to keep up the honor of the family in hers, and distinguish herself among her contemporaries as much. Thus for landlady...
As to landlord, he is as happy, and as big, as proud, as conceited as any nobleman in England; always calm and good-natured and lazy ; but the contemplation of his farm and his sons and his house and pastures and cows, his sound judgment, as he thinks, and his great holiness, as well as that of his wife, keep him as erect in his thoughts as a noble or a prince. Indeed, the more I consider of mankind, the more I see that every man seriously and in his conscience believes himself the wisest, brightest, best, happiest, etc of all mankind. I went this evening, spent an hour and took a pipe with Judge Trowbridge at his lodgings.”
(https://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/archive/doc?id=D20&bc=%2Fdigitaladams%2Farchive%2Fbrowse%2Fdiaries_by_number.php)
Tuesday March 29, 1774: “Put up at the old place, Treadwell’s. The old lady has got a new copy of her great-grandfather, Governor Endicott’s picture hung up in the house. The old gentleman is afraid they will repeal the excise upon tea, and then that we shall have it plenty; wishes they would double the duty, and then we should never have any more.”

Rantoul, Robert S., "A Note on the Authenticity of the Portraits of Gov. Endecott"[2]

(page 11) "March 29,1774, writing at Treadwell’s Tavern in Ipswich, Mr. Adams says (Life and Works,V ol. II,p. 337) "Rode to Ipswich, and put up at the old place, Treadwell’s. The old lady has got a new copy of her great-grandfather, Governor Endicott’s picture hung up in the house.
The landlord of the old Treadwell Tavern on the bill at Ipswich, which was such a favorite resort with Mr. Adams when riding the eastern circuit as a young lawyer, was Nathaniel Treadwell, in the inventory of whose estate, (page 12) dated May 10, 1777, in which silver plate is appraised at eight shillings per ounce, "Gun, Sword, Cartouch-box and powder-horn, £3.00” and "2 Brass Kettles & Brass Skillets, L4.10," appears this item, "The Effigies of Governor Endicott L4.4." The Tavern house was left by will to the eldest son, Jacob, the father of John White Treadwell, Esq. Landlord Treadwell left a widow, Hannah, who was not the mother of his children, and she left, by a will proved Aug. 6, 1792, "one dozen of pewter plates marked H. E., to Jacob Treadwell’s daughter Hannah.” In an inventory of Hannah Treadwell’s estate, filed Dec. 4, 1792, appears "Governour Endicot’s Effigies, 24 sh." Hannah Endecott, daughter of the second Zerobabel, was born about 1706, and was a great-granddaughter of Governor Endecott. Probably it was she of whom Mr. Adams wrote, Mar. 29, 1774, "The old lady has got a new copy of her great-grandfather, Governor Endecott’s picture hung up in the house.”
We next hear of this Treadwell picture in the house of Deacon Aaron Treadwell, second son of Landlord Treadwell,who received, on the death of his father’s widow, one half her furniture, for which he receipted, Apr. 6, 1795.
It is remembered by David Pulsifer, of Boston, the well-known antiquary, whose boyhood was passed in Ipswich, as hanging in Deacon Aaron Treadwell’s parlor, and the story is current that on one occasion when the room was filled with a concourse of the Baptist clergy, a class of guests to whom the Deacon was especially hospitable, one of them turned the face of the picture to the wall, because, as he said, Governor Endecott persecuted the Baptists.
It then became the property of John White Treadwell of Salem, and he presented it to the Essex Historical Society.


Find A Grave #80975784

Burial: Highland Cemetery, Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
Birth: unknown
Death: Jul. 6, 1792
She died aged 87 years.
Inscription: epitaph:
"Blessed are the dead which die
in the lord for they rest from their
labours and their works do follow
them."

Sources

  1. Will of Hannah (Endicott) Treadwell, 1 Jan 1788, Ipswich, Essex Co., MA: Massachusetts, Wills and Probate Records, 1635-1991, Essex - Probate Records, Roll:Treadwell, E-Treadwell, J, 1828-1991: Published at Ancestry.com. Treadwell Estate Records are out of order on the film. Patched together and transcribed by Tim Treadwell, June 2019 Page 1(img 222 of 234), Page 2 (img 16 of 234), Page 3 (img 214 of 234)
  2. Rantoul, Robert S., "A Note on the Authenticity of the Portraits of Gov. Endecott", Essex Institute Historical Collections, Vol. XX (20), Printed for the Essex Institute, The Salem Press, Salem, Mass, 1883. Published online at Forgotten Books


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