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Andrew Grant (bef. 1736 - 1809)

Capt. Andrew Grant
Born before in Berwick, York, Province of Massachusetts Baymap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married before 20 Jan 1759 [location unknown]
Husband of — married 24 Apr 1767 in Woolwich, Lincoln County, Province of Massachusetts Baymap
Descendants descendants
Died in Hampden, Hancock County, District of Maine, Massachusetts, United Statesmap
Profile manager: Stu Bloom private message [send private message]
Profile last modified | Created 3 Dec 2016
This page has been accessed 699 times.
SAR insignia
Andrew Grant is an NSSAR Patriot Ancestor.
NSSAR Ancestor #: P169407
Rank: Captain
Andrew Grant is a member of Clan Grant.

Contents

Biography

Parentage; Date and Place of Birth

Andrew Grant was the son of James Grant and Sarah (Joy) Grant. No record of Andrew's birth has been found and his date of birth is uncertain. Andrew was baptized at the First Church of Berwick, Maine, on 30 May 1736 as the son of "James Grant junr,"[1] which establishes that he was born sometime before that date. His gravestone states that he died on 12 October 1809 at the age of 79,[2] which would mean that he was born in 1730. However, stated or believed ages of older people when there died were, at the time, very unreliable. Since Andrew's sister Sarah was baptized in June 1730[3] and his brother Ephraim was baptized in April 1731,[4] it is unlikely that Andrew was born before 1733. On the other hand, since Andrew was listed among the settlers along the Kennebec River who signed a petition in 1752 requesting a new county be set up,[5] it is also unlikely that he was born after 1734. It is therefore most likely that Andrew was born sometime in 1733-1734 and baptized several years after his birth. Since Andrew and his older siblings were baptized in Berwick, Maine and his father resided there during the period when Andrew was born,[6] Andrew was no doubt born in Berwick.

Residency at Montsweag/Woolwich

From 1752 to 1770, Andrew resided at Montsweag, where his father, James, had moved.[6] Montsweag appears not to have been part of any township until 1759 when it became part of Woolwich when Woolwich was incorporated in that year.[7] During the latter part of his residency at Montsweag, Andrew appears to have also owned land on Parker Island in Georgetown.

James Grant, Elijah Grant, Ephiram Grant and Andrew Grant were among several hundred settlers along the Kennebec River who signed a petition in 1752 to the Lieutentant Governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay requesting a new county be set up to provide regional government for the area.[5]

A list of the members of the militia within the District of Whiscasite in 1757 included Ephraim Grant, Andrew Grant and Elijah Grant.[8]

By a deed dated 10 June 1756, Andrew Grant of Mount Sweege, husbandman, for £5, conveyed to Joseph Greenleaf of Mount Sweege, laborer, a lot of land on an island called Jeremysquam containing 100 acres.[9]

By a deed dated October 1764, James Grant, gentleman, and Catrine Grant his wife of Woolwich, in consideration of £6, conveyed to Andrew Grant of Mountsweeg in Woolwich, one quarter part of a saw mill which was owned in partnership with Solomon Walker, Elijah Grant and Andrew Grant, lying on the Mountsweeg Brook, and also two acres of thatch beds in Pownalborough.[10]

By a deed dated 19 April 1768, Alexander Grant of Georgetown, yeoman, in consideration of £14:6, conveyed to Benjamin Oliver of Georgetown, yeoman, a neck of land containing 65 acres on Missone Islane or Parker Island.[11]

By a deed dated 15 January 1770, Andrew Grant of Woolwich, yeoman, and Elizabeth his wife, in consideration of £6:13:4, conveyed to John Baily of Woolwich, a tract of land in Woolwich containing 100 acres.[12]

First Marriage and Children

Andrew Grant married, first, Patience Gooden (or Goodwin) by the birth of their first known child, on 20 Jan 1759.[13]

Andrew Grant[14] and his wife Patience[15] owned the covenant at Rev. Josiah Winship's church in Woolwich, Maine on 7 Jul 1765 and their four eldest children were baptized there on the same date.[16]

Andrew and Patience had the following children:

  1. Elisha, b. say 1755 in Montsweag, Maine, bpt. 7 July 1765 at Woolwich, Maine, m. about 1784 Hannah Crosby probably in Winslow, Maine, d. probably 1788 at Wheelersborough, Maine. (See discussion and sources in Elisha's profile.)
  2. Sarah, b. say 1757 at Mountsweag, Maine, bpt. 7 July 1765 at Woolwich, Maine[16]
  3. Gooden, b. 20 January 1759 at Mountsweag, Maine, bpt. 7 July 1765 in Woolwich, Maine, d. 28 July 1822 at Hampden, Maine. (See discussion and sources in Gooden's profile.)
  4. Anna, b. probably sometime in 1761-4 at Woolwich, Maine, bpt. 7 July 1765 at Woolwich, Maine[16]
  5. Ama(?) (a son), d. 21 September 1765 at Woolwich, Maine[17]
  6. unnamed infant, d. 14 September 1766 at Woolwich, Maine[17]

Andrew's first wife, Patience, died at Woolwich on 14 September 1766, the same day as her last-born child.[17]

Second Marriage and Children

Andrew Grant and Elizabeth Dunton applied for a certificate of marriage at Woolwich, Maine, on 4 April 1767. The certificate was granted on 24 April 1767, and they were married there on 30 April 1767.[18] The published vital records of Georgetown, Maine, also show the marriage, but seven months later, on 27 November 1767.[19] This may be a misinterpretation of an original record of the birth of their son, Andrew Grant; see the Research Note on his profile for a further discussion.

Andrew and Elizabeth probably had the following children:

  1. Andrew, b. probably 27 November 1767 in Woolwich, m. 1st 26 December 1790 Zebiah Walker in Prospect, m. 2d before 8 September 1831 Hannah ________, d. 8 February 1853 in Hampden. (See discussion and sources in Andrew's profile.)
  2. John, b. say 1769 in Woolwich, m. 15 August 1795 Lydia Haskell in Vinalhaven, d. about 1820 probably in Vinalhaven. (See discussion and sources in John's profile.)
  3. Patience, b. say 1771 on Jeremysquam Island or at Wheelersborough, m. 12 Apr 1794 Stephen Sherman in Vinalhaven, d. between 1850 and 1860 in either Marion or East Machias. (See discussion and sources in Patience's profile.)
  4. Solomon, b. 5 March 1773 at Wheelersborough, m. 12 April 1794 Catherine Lasell in Vinalhaven, d. before 1850 probably in Vinalhaven. (See discussion and sources in Solomon's profile.)
  5. Ruth, b. 13 October 1775 at Wheelersborough, m. 29 December 1799 in Vinalhaven, d. 3 June 1860 in Ogden, Utah. (See discussion and sources in Ruth's profile.)
  6. Mary, b. 1 October 1779 on Swan Island, Pownalborough, m. after 15 October 1798 (date of intentions) William Cotrall. (See discussion and sources in Mary's profile.)

Residency on Jeremysquam Island

By the later part of 1770, Andrew appears to have moved from Mountsweag/Woolwich across the Black RIver to Jeremysquam Island (now Westport, Maine).

By a deed dated 11 September 1770, Isaac Clewley of Penobscot, ship carpenter, in consideration of £10, conveyed to Andrew Grant of Jeremysquam, husbandman, a tract of land on the Penobscot River containing 100 acres that had been granted to Clewley by the heirs of Brigadier Samuel Waldo on the condition that Clewley build a house on such land of not less than 20 feet by 16 feet and 7 feet studd and clear 5 acres of the land, which condition had been performed by said Grant.[20]

By a deed dated 15 October 1770, Andrew Grant of Jeremysquam Island, yeoman, in consideration of £40, conveyed to Elijah Grant, yeoman, and Solomon Walker, yeoman, his 1/2 interest in the saw mill on Monswegue Brook.[21]

By a deed dated 15 October 1770, Andrew Grant of Jeremysquam Island, yeoman, in consideration of £8, conveyed to Elijah Grant the two acres of thatch beds in Pownalborough that Andrew Grant purchased from his father James Grant, reserving the dower of Andrew's father's widow. The deed was also signed by Andrew's wife Elisabeth.[22]

First Residency at Wheelersborough

About 1772, Andrew moved from Jeremysquam to a settlement on the Penobscot River that by the late 1770s was known as Wheelersborough. Wheelersborough was included in the town of Frankfort when Frankfort was incorporated in 1789 and then became part of the town of Hampden when Hampden was incorporated in 1794.[23] The 1772 date of Andrew's removal to Wheelersborough is based on a December 1786 report by Jonathan Stone regarding the town of Hampden that stated that Goodwin Grant, Andrew Grant and Elisha Grant had lived there for 14 years.[24]

On a tax list for heads of families on both sides of the Penobscot between Deadwater (Stillwater) and Bald Hill Cover in 1776 included an entry for Andrew Grant, taxed at £1:7:9.[25]

Ephraim Grant, Andrew Grant, James Grant and Elisha Grant were among the inhabitants of Wheelersborough who signed a petition dated March 13, 1777 asking for Wheelersborough to be incorporated as a town.[26]

Revolutionary War Military Service

Capt. Andrew Grant served during the American Revolution
Service started:
Unit(s):
Service ended:

During the Revolutionary War, Andrew was captain of the 3d company of Col. Josiah Brewer's (Penobscot) regiment. He was on a list of officers dated 1 July 1777 and in command of a detachment that served for 30 days from 18 August 1777 to 16 September 1777 and marched to the assistance of Machias.[27]

Elisha Grant, Captain Andrew Grant, Ephraim Grant, Henry Grant, Goodwin Grant and Adam Grant were among the inhabitants of Penobscot River in Col. Josiah Brewer's regiment to signed a petition dated November 1777 requesting that the regiment be merged back into Col. Jonathan Buck's regiment, from which it had been split off without prior consultation.[28]

Residency on Swan Island, Pownalborough

In June 1779, a British expedition landed at Castine and started constructing a fort there. After an attempt by an Massachusetts fleet in August 1779 to dislodge the British was smashed by the arrival of a British fleet, many settlers left the Penobscot until the end of the war.[29] Some went to Camden and others to the Kennebec River.[26]

It appears that Andrew and his family removed to Swan Island in the Kennebec River. A record states that Andrew's probable daughter Mary was born in October 1779 on Swan's Island.[30] The Swan's Island referenced in that record was no doubt Swan Island on the Kennebec River rather than Swans Island near Mount Desert Island because (1) the residents who left Wheelersborough were known to have gone to Camden and the Kennebec River,[26] (2) Swan Island was part of Pownalborough (later called Dresden), where Andrew had previously owned land, and was close to Montsweag and Jeremysqualm,[31] (3) Swan Island on the Kennebec was utilized by Colonialist forces during the Revolutionary War and thus appears to have been under Colonialist control,[31] and (4) Swan's Island near Mt. Desert Island was not purchased by James Swan until 1785 and does not appear to have been settled until later in the 1780s.[32]

After the end of the Revoluationary War in 1783, most of the original Wheelersborough settlers returned to Wheelersborough.[26] Andrew was one of those who returned.

Second Residency in Wheelersborough/Frankfort

A list of inhabitants of Wheelersborough who were assessed £0:3:6 each on 27 May 1784 to pay for the town's purchase of Jeremiah Colburn's lot included Ephraim Grant, James Grant, Adam Grant, William Grant, Andrew Grant, Elisha Grant and Gooden Grant.[33]

Andrew Grant, Robert McCordey and Elihu Hewes, all of Penobscot River, took the inventory of the estate of Benjamin Wheeler of Penobscot River on 1 July 1785, while Andrew's son Elisha Grant served as a surety for Benjamin's widow, the administratrix.[34]

In 1789, Andrew Grant of the plantation called Wheelsborough, yeoman, sold two separate lots in Wheelsborough to Andrew Grant Junior of the same, miner.[35]

In May 1790, Gooden Grant, Andrew Grant and Andrew Grant Jr. were among the inhabitants of Wheelersborough who signed a petition asking for further time to raise the money to pay for formal title to the properties on which they had long lived.[36]

The 1790 US Census for Frankfort, Maine includes a household headed by Andrew Grant that contained four males 16 or older and three females. The same census for Frankfort also included a household headed by Andrew's son Gooding Grant.[37] Andrew lived only briefly in Frankfort, as in 1791, Andrew Grant of Frankfort, yeoman, sold 100 acres of land there to James Whalen of Fox Island, Vinalhaven.

Residency in Vinalhaven

Andrew removed to Vinalhaven about 1792. At a Vinalhaven town meeting in April 1792, Andrew Grant was chosen as a tithing man;[38] on 6 July 1792, his sheep mark was recorded as "the right ear split with a hole in the Left";[39] at a Vinalhaven town meeting in September 1794, Capt. Andrew Grant was chosen as the moderator;[40] and at a Vinalhaven town meeting in April 1799, Andrew Grant Sr was chosen as a surveyor of roads on the North Island, while Solomon Grant was chosen as a tithing man.[41]

The 1800 US Census for Vinalhaven, Maine includes a household headed by Andrew Grant that contained one male under 10, one male 45 and older (Andrew) and one female 45 and older (Andrew's wife Elizabeth) and states that Andrew had been born in Berwick. The same census for Vinalhaven also included households headed by Andrew's sons John and Solomon, both of whom are stated to have been 26-45 and born in Hampden.[42]

Third Residency in Wheelersborough/Hampden

Based on his place of death, sometime after 1800, Andrew moved back to Hampden, no doubt to live with his son Andrew Jr., who had remained there.

Death and Burial

Andrew Grant died at Hampden, Maine on 12 October 1809[43][2] and was buried at the Old Burying Ground in Hampden[2]. According to a 2007 article about Andrew in Hampden Highlights magazine, a newspaper gave the following report of his passing:

Andrew Grant. Died. At Hampden, ME. Thursday night, it is supposed from the effects of Paris green, which he had been putting on potato vines.” [44]

Paris green was a green powder used as an insect poison,[45] so it seems that Andrew poisoned himself while tending his vegetables.

No will or estate records for Andrew have been found.


Undocumented Narrative

Note: The following was posted on this profile, without source references. It appears to have been mostly taken from Bushman's undocumented Grant family genealogy,[46] and should be regarded with caution. Some of the narrative that is contradicted by documented evidence has been removed. (Bloom-1124 13:49, 14 May 2019 (UTC)) Other parts of the narrative that have been incorporated into the main profie has also been deleted. (Ashley-1950 28 Mar 2020).

About 1770, he signed a petition for the town of Woolwich to build a road to his father's mill.


Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 Anderson, Joseph C. II. Records of the First and Second Churches of Berwick, Maine. Rockport, Me., 1999. p. 43. Link to page at archive.org.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Photo of gravestone of Andrew Grant (Find A Grave: Memorial #39803508)
  3. 3.0 3.1 Anderson, Joseph C. II. Records of the First and Second Churches of Berwick, Maine. Rockport, Me., 1999. p. 30. Link to page at archive.org.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Anderson, Joseph C. II. Records of the First and Second Churches of Berwick, Maine. Rockport, Me., 1999. p. 31. Link to page at archive.org.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "Petition for a New County in Maine, 1752." Bangor Historical Magazine. Vol. III No. X (April 1888). p. 189. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 See the profile for James Grant.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "Woolwich, Maine," wikipedia.com
  8. 8.0 8.1 "Soldiers at Wicasset and Vicinity, 1757." Bangor Historical Magazine. Vol. III No. VI (December 1887). p. 109. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Lincoln County Land Records, Vol. 6, p. 267. FHL Film #008202837, image 25 of 674. Link to page at familysearch.org.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Lincoln County Land Records, Vol. 4, p. 24. FHL Film #008296945, image 37 of 575. Link to page at familysearch.org.
  11. 11.0 11.1 Lincoln County Land Records, Vol. 11, p. 127. FHL Film #007834678, image 361 of 674. Link to page at familysearch.org.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Lincoln County Land Records, Vol. 7, p. 136. FHL Film #008202837, image 431 of 563. Link to page at familysearch.org.
  13. Maine Families in 1790 (Waterville, Me., 1990-2016), 3:94
  14. 14.0 14.1 Records of the Rev. Josiah WInship's Church, Woolwich, Maine. Copied and typed by Mrs. Nellie Lord and Mrs. Lena C. Ring of the Colonel Dummer Sewall Capter of the DAR, Bath, Maine, 1944. p. 10. FHL Film #008133037, image 860 of 902. Link to image of page at familysearch.org.
  15. 15.0 15.1 Records of the Rev. Josiah WInship's Church, Woolwich, Maine. Copied and typed by Mrs. Nellie Lord and Mrs. Lena C. Ring of the Colonel Dummer Sewall Capter of the DAR, Bath, Maine, 1944. p. 11. FHL Film #008133037, image 860 of 902. Link to image of page at familysearch.org.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 Records of the Rev. Josiah WInship's Church, Woolwich, Maine. Copied and typed by Mrs. Nellie Lord and Mrs. Lena C. Ring of the Colonel Dummer Sewall Capter of the DAR, Bath, Maine, 1944. p. 14. FHL Film #008133037, image 865 of 902. Link to image of page at familysearch.org.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 Records of the Rev. Josiah WInship's Church, Woolwich, Maine. Copied and typed by Mrs. Nellie Lord and Mrs. Lena C. Ring of the Colonel Dummer Sewall Capter of the DAR, Bath, Maine, 1944. p. 34. FHL Film #008133037, image 886 of 902. Link to image of page at familysearch.org.
  18. Groves, Marlene A., compiler, Vital Records of Woolwich, Maine (Waterville, Me., 2015), 60 for the certificate, 471 for the marriage
  19. Hill, Mary Pelham, ed., Vital records of Georgetown, Maine, to the year 1892 (Auburn, Me., 1939-1943), 2:34
  20. 20.0 20.1 Lincoln County Land Records, Vol. 7, p. 136. FHL Film #008202837, image 537 of 563. Link to page at familysearch.org.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Lincoln County Land Records, Vol. 8, p. 13. FHL Film #008296946, image 25 of 580. Link to page at familysearch.org.
  22. 22.0 22.1 Lincoln County Land Records, Vol. 8, p. 26. FHL Film #008296946, image 38 of 580. Link to page at familysearch.org.
  23. 23.0 23.1 History of Penobscot County, Maine, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches. Williams, Chase & Co. 1882. p. 370. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  24. 24.0 24.1 "Town of Hampden. No. I, First Range North of Waldo Patent." Bangor Historical Magazine. Vol. II No. II (August 1886). p. 27. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  25. 25.0 25.1 History of Penobscot County, Maine, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches. Williams, Chase & Co. 1882. p. 523. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.3 26.4 "Town of Hampden. No. I, First Range North of Waldo Patent." Bangor Historical Magazine. Vol. II No. II (August 1886). p. 26. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  27. 27.0 27.1 Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War. Volume. VI. 1891. p. 723. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  28. 28.0 28.1 "Petition from Penobscot River to the General Court, 1777." Bangor Historical Magazine. Vol. IV Nos. 1 & 2 (August 1888). p. 13. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  29. 29.0 29.1 History of Penobscot County, Maine, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches. Williams, Chase & Co. 1882. pp. 524-528. Link to pages at hathitrust.org.
  30. 30.0 30.1 See the profile Mary Grant.
  31. 31.0 31.1 31.2 "The Other Swan Island: A Jewel on the Kennebec," maineboats.com
  32. 32.0 32.1 Small, H.W. A History of Swan's Island, Maine. Hancock County Publishing Company, 1898. pp. 17-24. Link to pages at archive.org.
  33. 33.0 33.1 History of Penobscot County, Maine, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches. Williams, Chase & Co. 1882. p. 536. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  34. 34.0 34.1 Patterson, William D. The Probate Records of Lincoln County, Maine. 1760 to 1800. Maine Genealogical Society, 1895. p. 126. Link to page at hathitrust.
  35. 35.0 35.1 Hancock Records, Waldo Lands, 1791-1850, Vol. 2, pp. 219-220. FHL Film # 008203770, images 148-149 of 596. Link to images at familysearch.org.
  36. 36.0 36.1 "Town of Hampden. No. I, First Range North of Waldo Patent." Bangor Historical Magazine. Vol. II No. II (August 1886). p. 28. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  37. 37.0 37.1 "United States Census, 1790," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHKK-YH9 : accessed 23 March 2020), Andrew Grant, Frankfort, Hancock, Maine, United States; citing p. 75, NARA microfilm publication M637, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 2; FHL microfilm 568,142.
  38. 38.0 38.1 Vinalhaven Town & Vital Records, Vol 1 1785-1828. p. 10. FHL Film #007596929, image 13 of 837. Link to image at familysearch.org.
  39. 39.0 39.1 Vinalhaven Town & Vital Records, Vol 1 1785-1828. p. 437. FHL Film #007596929, image 240 of 837. Link to image at familysearch.org.
  40. 40.0 40.1 Vinalhaven Town & Vital Records, Vol 1 1785-1828. p. 19. FHL Film #007596929, image 17 of 837. Link to image at familysearch.org.
  41. 41.0 41.1 Vinalhaven Town & Vital Records, Vol 1 1785-1828. p. 27. Link to image at familysearch.org.
  42. 42.0 42.1 "United States Census, 1800," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHR8-C9S : accessed 28 March 2020), Andrew Grant, Vinalhaven, Hancock, Maine, United States; citing p. 3, NARA microfilm publication M32, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 7; FHL microfilm 218,677.
  43. 43.0 43.1 Gills, Arthur Sylvester, and Richard E. Spinney, transcribers and editors. Vital Records of Hampden, Maine, Prior to 1892 (Rockland, Me., 2007). p. 50
  44. 44.0 44.1 Chaiyabhat, Nancy. "At Home Around Hampden. Facts and History of Life in Hampden." Hampden Highlights. Issue 9, October 2007. p. 11. Link to magazine issue.
  45. 45.0 45.1 "Paris Green," wikipedia.org
  46. Bushman, Leola Grant, Peter Grant, Scotch Exile, Kittery and Berwick, Maine (n. p., 1971)
  47. "Deaths in Hampden, Maine. Copied from Inscriptions on Gravestones." Bangor Historical Magazine. Vol. IV No. 5 (November 1888). p. 96. Link to page at hathitrust.org.
  48. Hancock Records, Waldo Lands, 1791-1850, Vol. 14, p. 128. FHL Film # 008203771, image 542 of 666. p. 128. Link to image at familysearch.org.
  49. "United States Census, 1800," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHR8-H17 : accessed 23 March 2020), Andrew Grant, Hampden, Hancock, Maine, United States; citing p. 177, NARA microfilm publication M32, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 7; FHL microfilm 218,677.

See also:

  • Daughters of the American Revolution, DAR Genealogical Research Databases, database online, (http://www.dar.org/ : accessed Sept. 13, 2017), "Record of Andrew Grant", Ancestor # A046991.
  • "Andrew Grant" in Wills, Connie J., and Raymond E. Vermette, The Founding Fathers of Woolwich, Maine, and their Families (Wiscasset, Maine, 2009), 50-53


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Comments: 6

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I see your point. The problem I have is that James and Sarah (Joy) Grant seem to have baptized their children shortly after their births. They were married on Berwick on 9 Mar 1724/25, and they baptized their son James there nine months later, in December 1725. They then baptized children in December 1727, June 1730, and April 1731. There does not seem be room for Andrew before mid-1732, at the very earliest. Given the facts you cite (and his age at his death from his gravestone) i think it's possible that he was born several years before he was baptized, but not before 1732.

I think we should leave the "before" baptism date in the data section and add your analysis under the "Birth" subhead.

I also think the correct marriage date is 30 Apr, not 24 Apr, based on the Woolwich VR source.

posted by Stu Bloom
OK. That works. I agree that he was probably not born before 1732, but (based on the petitions) I think he was probably not born after 1734. I'll write some discussion.
posted by Chase Ashley
I have found new evidence that suggests that Andrew was probably born before 1736.

First, per son Elisha's profile, based on the fact that Elisha was one of the inhabitants of Wheelersborough who signed a petition on March 12, 1777 asking for Wheelersborough to be incorporated as a town, it is probable that Elisha was born before March 1756, which would make it unlikely that Andrew was born after 1734.

Second, Andrew himself was among the settlers along the Kennebec River who signed a petition in 1752 to the Lieutentant Governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay requesting a new county be set up to provide regional government for the area, which suggests that it is probably that Andrew was born no later than 1731 and almost certainly not as late as 1736.

posted by Chase Ashley
edited by Chase Ashley
DOB of 1730 per grave is probably correct. Son Elijah was probably born about 1753 (since was married in 1776). The family appears to have had a custom of very late baptisms.
posted by Chase Ashley
edited by Chase Ashley
He had siblings baptized in 1725, 1727, 1730, and 1731. [Anderson, Joseph C. II, Records of the First and Second Churches of Berwick, Maine (Rockport, Me., 1999), pp. 24, 27, 30, 31)]. What is the evidence for a custom of late baptisms?
posted by Stu Bloom
I take back that "custom of late baptisms" comment. But since we don't know when James' children were born, we don't know how quickly they were baptized after they were born. The baptisms of Sarah (June 1730) and Ephraim (April 1731), suggest that Sarah was probably born a year or more before her baptism. Andrew's 4 oldest children don't seem to have been baptized until well after their births, with eldest son Elisha probably at least 9 years old when he was baptized. That said, I assume that if Andrew had been born before April 1731, his parents would have gotten him baptized with Ephraim. Perhaps most likely, James Jr was born in 1725, Mary in 1727, Sarah in 1729, Ephraim in 1731 and Andrew about 1733. I don't think there was any legal age requirement to sign a petition, but I doubt they would had have a boy under 18 sign.
posted by Chase Ashley