William Hatfield
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William Anderson Hatfield (1839 - 1921)

William Anderson "Devil Anse" Hatfield
Born in Logan County, Virginia, United Statesmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 18 Apr 1861 in Logan County, West Virginia, United Statesmap
Descendants descendants
Died at age 81 in Stirrat, Logan County, West Virginia, United Statesmap
Profile last modified | Created 7 Aug 2011
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Contents

Biography

Notables Project
William Hatfield is Notable.
Private William Hatfield served in the United States Civil War.
Enlisted: 1 May, 1863
Mustered out: 11 May, 1865
Side: CSA
Regiment(s): 45th Battalion, Virginia Infantry

William Anderson "Devil Anse" Hatfield was born in Logan County, Virginia, on 9 September 1839.[1] Logan County is located in modern day West Virginia, which wasn't a state until 1863. He was the son of Ephraim "Big Eaf" Hatfield and Nancy "Bettie" Vance. His name is usually given as William Anderson Hatfield in the secondary sources, but he consistently used just Anderson.

William Anderson Hatfield was an imposing figure, six feet tall. Military records describe him as having dark hair, dark eyes, and a dark complexion, and for most of his life he wore a full, dark beard.

William Anderson Hatfield
Anderson Hatfield, on a horse.

Anderson Hatfield was an uncle to Governor of West Virginia, and United States Senator, Henry D. Hatfield.[2]

Anderson Hatfield was notable for being a primary member of the infamous Hatfield & McCoy Feud in Kentucky and West Virginia. He was never called “Devil Anse” by anyone before 1888, when he was so identified by the New York reporter T. C. Crawford. Another New York reporter, John Spears wrote in the same year. Getting his information first-hand from Ran’l McCoy and Perry Cline, Spears called him “Bad Anse.”

The Hatfield Clan, 1897.

Hatfield & Stafford Feud

In 1860, Flemmon Stafford accused several Hatfields of assault in Pike County, Kentucky. Anderson was summoned to court along with his brother and several of his Kentucky Hatfield cousins. As one of the other Hatfields was also named Anderson, the court had to distinguish them in the indictment.

Court summons for Hatfields

Relations between the two families had broken down in 1858, when Flem Stafford, brother of Tom’s father, Compton Stafford, was sued for slander by George Hatfield. (Case# 1673, from 1858.)[3]

The charge in the George Hatfield case was that Flem Stafford had been telling folks all over the area that George Hatfield was carrying on an illicit love affair with his mare. Flem was said to have even told folks that George Hatfield had sired several foals by his equine lover. The suit was soon followed by another suit, this time with Flem suing George Hatfield and several other Hatfields. (Case# 1889, from 1860.)[3]

About 1857, Flem Stafford took some timber from a tract on Blackberry Creek that was owned by George Hatfield. The plat of the 100 acre tract is in the case record. The dispute soon spawned the claim by Flem that George was a horse lover.[3]

A witness testified that he saw the 55-year-old George and the much younger Flem meet on the road in June, 1860, at which time Flem, with a gun in his hand, cursed George as “A yellow-hided devil,” and told George that if he messed with him, he would “blow a ball through him.”[3]

The witness swore that George turned his horse and started toward his home, with Flem armed and following him. He said that shortly after that, he saw George’s horse coming toward him, with an empty saddle. He led George’s horse toward George’s home, and found George in the road, obviously worse for wear. George told him that Flem knocked him off his horse and beat him.[3]

In August, the Hatfields got even, giving Flem a group-thrashing he would never forget. Flem swore that he was attacked with fists, rocks, knives and guns.[3]

In different parts of the record, Flem ascribes misdeeds to various combinations of the seven Hatfields named. He says that Madison and Anderson, two of George’s sons, came into his house and forced him to ride down the road with them. Anderson is the one known as “Preacher Anse." Then Flem claims he was set upon by a full squad of Hatfields, including Ransom, James, Madison, Basil and Anderson, sons of George, along with two cousins who came across the river from Logan County, Virginia to assist the Blackberry Hatfields. We know who they were, because the court record lists them as Valentine (Wall) and Anderson, with the notation by each name: “Big Eph’s son.” [3]

The case was still in court when the Civil War broke out, and its final settlement unknown, as there was no court held during the War.[3]

Marriage and Children

Anderson married Levisa Chafin on 18 April 1861 in Logan County, West Virginia, and they had 13 children.

Anderson and Levisy lived with his parents up to the start of the Civil War. [4][5]

Civil War Service

William was commissioned a First Lieutenant of 2nd Regiment, Co. G, Virginia State Line, 20 September, 1862.[6] A group made to protect the territory along the Kentucky-Virginia border where resident loyalties to the Union and Confederacy were mixed. The Virginia State Line eventually disbanded in 1863 and William enlisted in Logan county, Virginia with the Confederate 45th Battalion, Virginia Infantry, Co. B as a private. He enlisted using his middle name Anderson. He is shown as a deserter by the Confederate Army, was arrested in 1863 and sent to Libby Prison camp in Richmond, Virginia for a short time, released and returned home. He was considered a rebel deserter by the Union Army and on 11 May, 1865 he signed a Amnesty oath to the Union.[7]

The group called "Logan Wildcats" was a militia group formed in Logan County before the Civil War. When the Civil War broke out, it became Company D of the 36th Infantry, and remained in service in the regular Confederate Army until it was mustered out three days after Lee’s surrender. Anderson Hatfield never appeared on its roster. The Logan Wildcats, as a unit led by "Devil Anse" Hatfield, entered the literature in 1976, with the publication of Truda McCoy’s “The McCoys.” McCoy, whose history was so garbled that she had Wall Hatfield tried, convicted and dead before he was even arrested, is the mother of the now famous “Logan Wildcats” of Devil Anse Hatfield. [8]

Hatfield & McCoy Feud

On August 7, 1882, Ellison Hatfield, the brother of Anderson, was killed by three sons of Randolph McCoy. Stabbed to death by Tolbert, Pharmer and Randolph Jr. McCoy. Ellison was stabbed 26 times. Both Randolph McCoy and his eldest son, Jim, testified that the troubles between them and the family of Anderson Hatfield began on that day.

On 29 November, 1889, "The Wheeling Intelligencer" newspaper, West Virginia, published an article headlined:

"DEVIL ANSE" HATFIELD "Arraigned in the United States Court at Charleston" "He Is Tried And Acquitted" "On a Charge of Violating Revenue Laws and is Offered Government Protection Outside the Lines. A Conspiracy Frustrated":
Devil Anse Hatfield

This article concentrates on "Devil Anse's" arrest (his first ever by an officer of the law) for breaking revenue laws. Bits include: " 'Devil Anse' Hatfield, of Logan Country, of whom so much has been said & written...was taken in charge by the United States authorities for trial on a charge of having violated the Internal Revenue laws. He was tried & acquitted this afternoon...He and his friends were all heavily armed and three deputy marshals accompanied the party to where they left the railroad...'Devil Anse' is a medium sized man, very stoop shouldered...no one would judge from his appearance that he is the blood thirsty villain that imaginative newspaper men have pictured him to be..."

Anderson was accused in stories that he led a gang that freed his son, Johnson "Johnse", from arrest by Tolbert and Randolph Jr. McCoy in October, 1880. However, only Elias and Floyd Hatfield were charged, arrested and tried for allegedly participating in Johnse’s liberation from the custody of Tolbert and Randolph Jr. McCoy. Elias and Floyd turned themselves in and both were found not guilty.

He was accused in stories of leading the mob that captured and shot the three McCoys on August 9, 1882. This was known as the "Paw Paw Killings". Sons of Randal McCoy killed Ellison Hatfield, Anderson's brother on Election Day, 1882. He was never tried and convicted of that crime. He adamantly denied it until he died. He never admitted guilt during the ten years after he was baptized. The only sworn testimony connecting him to that crime came from two men who “turned state’s evidence” to save their own necks. They admitted in court that they were living in the home of “Uncle Ran’l and Aunt Sally McCoy” at the time they testified.

He lived another 39 years after that and was never accused, not even in the feud yarns, of harming another person.

Land Transactions & Court Cases

Anderson Hatfield was a party to many land transactions and some court cases for land deeds from the 1870s to 1900s, which details some of his business interests including timber interests. Below is a list of many of the known transactions. It is not known yet if this list is exhaustive and complete.

  • 29 December 1874: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy sold 200 acres land to Polly Hatfield for $780. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[9]
  • 23 March 1877: Perry A. Cline and wife conveyed 5000 acres land to Anderson Hatfield.[10] This stemmed from a court case where Anderson claimed he had purchased the land from Green Taylor. He won his court claim and the Cline's were court ordered to turn over the property to Anderson. The deed book transcribed reads: "This Deed of Conveyance made and entered into this 23rd day of March, 1877, between P.A. Cline and Martha Cline wife of P.A. Cline, parties of the first part and Anderson Hatfield, party of the second part witnesseth; that said parties of the first part, for and in consideration of the sum of one tract of land lying on the tug river in Pike County, Kentucky. It being the land that Anderson Hatfield purchased from Green W. Taylor valued at $10,000.00 do hereby sell and convey to the party of the second part, his heirs and assigns the following property to: All the lands that was willed to P.A. Cline by Jacob Cline Senior his father. Said land being and lying on tug river in Logan County, West Virginia. Containing 5000 acres more or less. To have and to hold the same together with all the appurtenance therein to the party of the first part, his heirs and assigns forever. And the said parties of the first part hereby covenant with the said party of the second part that they will warrant the title to the property conveyed, as security for the title to the aforesaid lands that is the Deed for the Land from Anderson Hatfield."
  • 2 July 1877: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy sold 150 acres land to Floyd Hatfield for $75. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[11]
  • 24 December 1877: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy sold 1,500 acres land to James Vance Jr. for $1,400. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[12]
  • 28 January 1882: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy sold 200 acres land to Johnson Hatfield for $250. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[13]
  • 30 September 1882: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy sold 150 acres land to Pliant Mayhan for $150. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[14]
  • 30 September 1882: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy sold 100 acres land to Samuel Mayhan for $100. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[15]
  • 2 November 1882: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy sold 200 acres land to Daniel Christian for $300. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[16]
  • 9 February 1883: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, Valentine Hatfield and Jane his wife, sold 400 acres land to Harrison Steel for $100. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[17]
  • On 29 August 1884, A Deed for Timber was issued to Julias C. Williamson for $1.00 per tree containing 446 Poplar trees and 26 Walnut trees, marked with axe and knife.[18]
  • 27 November 1884, Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 50 acres land to Moses Christian for $50. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[19]
  • 28 February 1885: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 300 acres land to Johnson Hatfield for $100. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[20]
  • 6 July 1885: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 25 acres land to E.S. Murphy for $50. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[21]
  • 22 July 1885: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 400 acres land to Anderson Hatfield Jr. and Nancy his wife for $300. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[22]
  • 22 July 1885: Johnson Hatfield sold to Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, 300 acres land for $400. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[23]
  • 22 July 1885: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 400 acres land to Anderson Hatfield Jr. and wife Nancy for $300.[24]
  • 1 March 1886: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 200 acres land to Harrison Steel for $400. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace.[25]
  • 20 March 1886: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 69 acres land to James Mounts for $100. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace. [26]
  • 20 March 1886: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 100 acres land to Charles R. Mounts for $100. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace. [27]
  • 17 June 1887: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 100 acres land to Jane Hatfield for $100. Valentine Hatfield signed as Justice of the Peace. [28]
  • 22 November 1887: Catherine Hatfield widow of Jacob Hatfield, Sarah Hatfield, Louisa Dotson, William Dotson, Martha Lee, Anderson Hatfield and Ransom Hatfield by committee conveyed 120 acres to Lewis Hatfield.[29]
  • 9 May 1888: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 1,500 acres land to J. Dickenson Sergeant for $500.[30]
  • 9 May 1888: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 600 acres land to Stuart Wood for Coal and mineral rights as well as right of way to transport the material. This deed excluded Poplar and Walnut trees.[31]
  • 10 May 1888: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 13.80 acres land to J. Dickenson Sergeant for $3,116.[32]
  • 11 July 1888: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 476 acres land to J. Dickenson Sergeant for $489.[33]
  • 14 February 1888: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 300 acres land to J. Dickenson Sergeant for Coal and mineral rights as well as right of way to transport the material. This deed excluded Poplar and Walnut trees.[34]
  • 10 March 1889: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 50 acres land to J. Dickenson Sergeant for $100.[35]
  • 26 March 1889: John Browning and wife Sarah, Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, John Varney and wife Martha, James Hatfield and wife Polly granted rights for Coal and minerals to Stewart Wood for $25. The exception was Poplar and Walnut timber. [36]
  • 3 July 1889: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, Asa McCoy and Nancy his wife, sold 289 acres land to Stuart Wood for $800.[37]
  • 6 September 1889: Anderson Hatfield in a Timber Deed sold timber for $352. [38] The deed reads: "I this day bargain sell and convey unto Little Kanawha Lumber Company all the poplar lumber, and ash and walnut trees thats sound and merchandisable timber for saw logs on my land on Island creek in Logan County, West Virginia that will measure twenty four inches in diameter at the stump for the price of acre dollar per tree and the right of way for rounds to have said timber on and also the right of way to splash over or around my land and also the privilege to build splash dams and place on my lands so as not to interfere with my dwelling house and timber and stone for to build said dams and if any unnecessary damages is done to said Hatfield lands the Co is to pay said Hatfield for the same when damages is assest and damage is to be assessed by the partys, Hatfield is to have the privilege of puting a grist mill in the same splash dam so as not to interfere with the operation of splashing timber at any time said Co wants use said splash dam and have received this day Three hundred and fifty two dollars on said contract."
  • 6 September 1889: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy in a Timber Deed sold timber for $25.[39]
  • 8 January 1891: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 100 acres land to Reese Browning and wife Nancy E. Hatfield for $1.[40]
  • 2 February 1891: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold 1,800 acres land to M.B. Mullins for $1,500. [41]
  • 24 April 1891: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, contracts to W. E. Reed, agent, to sell 200 acres land. The agency is to pay Anderson Hatfield $50 for "his labor in showing and time giving". [42]
  • 1 October 1891: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy in a Timber Deed sold timber for $100. [43]
  • 21 November 1891: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, granted right of way to Stewart Wood and J.A. Nighbert for transportation of materials for $1, and they pay for any crops grown. [44]
  • 18 June 1892: George R. Buskirk and his wife Mollie L. Buskirk sold Anderson Hatfield property in the town of Aracoma, West Virginia for $4,000. Anderson bought the property to build what was to become the Oakland House, a restaurant. Aracoma was renamed to Logan in 1907.[45]
  • 18 June 1892: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, granted right of way to George. R. Buskirk for $2. The purpose was to move timber for the building of Oakland House.[46]
  • 28 June 1892: Anderson Hatfield sold timber to George. R. Buskirk.[47]
  • 12 September 1892: Anderson Hatfield contracts G. J. Vinson, attorney at law, to clean up a land title. It reads in part: [48]: "Witnesseth that the party of the first part hath this day employed the party of the second part to institute and prosecute to final judgement or _______. all means any suit or suits and proceedings for the recovery of about 2000 or 2500 acres of land situate in Logan County, West Virginia mostly on Buck creek being part of the Perry Cline land that he conveyed to party of the first part being part of John Green 30,000 acres survey and to do and perform all things necessary in said proceeding necessary to clear up this title thereto and for a consideration."
  • 27 March 1893: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, sold the lot on Main St., Aracoma, West Virginia, where the Oakland House built, to Johnson Hatfield for $2,200.[49]
  • 2 October 1893: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, lost a lawsuit to G.W. Taylor, and the court ordered the sale of 800 acres owned by Anderson and Levisy to settle the judgment. That 800 acres, centered on Point Rock Hollow, was the subject of multiple court actions. 800 acres land to Richard Torpin, John Lambert Jr. and Howard S. Graham, trustees.[50][51][52]
  • 8 January 1894: Anderson Hatfield contracts G. J. Vinson, attorney at law, to clean up a land title for recovery of 3,000 acres.[53]
  • 6 September 1894: Anderson Hatfield and wife Levisy, granted right of way to Moses Mounts, Ralph Steel and H. K. Shumate for transportation of materials for $1.[54]
  • 15 February 1896: Between J. B. Wilkinson, special commissioner, appointed by the Circuit court awarded Johnson Hatfield a deed for the lot in the town of Aracoma, West Virginia. Anderson Hatfield and others were defendants in the case. The case was settled out of court.[55]
  • 30 April 1900: Between J. S. Miller, special commissioner, appointed by the Circuit court awarded L. D. Chambers a deed for land on Main Island creek. Anderson Hatfield, Levisy and others were defendants in the case.[56]

Death

Anderson Hatfield died of pneumonia on 6 January 1921 in Stirrat, Logan County, West Virginia at the age of 81 years old [57] and is buried in Hatfield Family Cemetery, Logan County, West Virginia. [58]

Sources

  1. https://archive.wvculture.org/vrr/va_dcdetail.aspx?Id=4545140
  2. Wikipedia - Henry D. Hatfield
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 "The Hatfield and Stafford Feud", blog post, Thomas Dotson, Lies, Damned Lies and Feud Tales, (https://hatfield-mccoytruth.com/2018/12/16/the-hatfield-and-stafford-feud/ : published 16 December 2018).
  4. "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6X39-NB3?cc=1401638&wc=95RH-JW5%3A1031351901%2C1032342101%2C1032364401 : 9 April 2016), Virginia > Logan > Logan county, part of > image 59 of 88; citing NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). Note: typo, spelled Alderson, should be Anderson.
  5. "United States Census, 1860", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M41D-XZT : 12 December 2017), Anderson Hatfield in entry for Ephraim Hatfield, 1860.
  6. "United States Confederate Officers Card Index, 1861-1865", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:736Y-GL2M : 6 September 2019), William Anderson Hatfield, 1861-1865.
  7. Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Virginia, Content Source: The National Archives Publication Number: M324, National archives catalog id:586957, Publisher: NARA, Record Group: 109, State: Virginia, Roll: 0891. https://www.fold3.com/image/16168847
  8. The Hatfield & McCoy Feud after Kevin Costner: Rescuing History,” by Tom E. Dotson. https://hatfield-mccoytruth.com/
  9. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. F-G 1856-1882, pg. 136, image 102, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z78Q-2?i=101&cat=73287
  10. Logan County Deed book, v. F-G 1856-1882, pg. 538, image 609, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z7ZM-L?i=608&cat=73287
  11. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. F-G 1856-1882, pg. 430, image 250, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z78S-L?i=248&cat=73287
  12. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. F-G 1856-1882, pg. 6, image 341, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z7ZJ-H?i=340&cat=73287
  13. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 81, image 79, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z925-2?i=79&cat=73287
  14. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 81, image 79, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92V-4?i=288&cat=73287
  15. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 582, image 333, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92N-H?i=332&cat=73287
  16. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 81, image 79, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92V-3?i=231&cat=73287
  17. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 514, image 300, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92F-X?i=299&cat=73287
  18. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 557, image 321, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92N-5?i=320&cat=73287
  19. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 132, image 488, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92Z-D?i=487&cat=73287
  20. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 337, image 591, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z924-Z?i=590&cat=73287
  21. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 278, image 562, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z924-Y?i=561&cat=73287
  22. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 225, image 534, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92W-D?i=533&cat=73287
  23. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 226, image 535, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92W-G?i=534&cat=73287
  24. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. P-Q, pg. 378, image 218, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Q9T7-2?i=217&cat=73287
  25. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 452, image 649, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92Q-X?i=648&cat=73287
  26. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 447, image 646, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z927-B?i=645&cat=73287
  27. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. H-I 1882-1886, pg. 453, image 649, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z92Q-X?i=648&cat=73287
  28. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. J-K 1884-1888, pg. 274, image 173, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-79D2-W?i=172&cat=73287
  29. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. N-O 1888-1891, pg. 279, image 173, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-CQZN-5?i=278&cat=73287
  30. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. J-K 1884-1888, pg. 156, image 440, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-79FM-9?i=439&cat=73287
  31. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. J-K 1884-1888, pg. 158, image 441, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-79XY-V?i=440&cat=73287
  32. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 50, image 57, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9WV-F?i=56&cat=73287
  33. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 59, image 61, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9WJ-6?i=60&cat=73287
  34. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 34, image 49, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9WV-J?i=48&cat=73287
  35. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 171, image 119, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9WF-D?i=118&cat=73287
  36. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 171, image 119, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9NC-W?i=249&cat=73287
  37. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 54, image 418, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z947-Z?i=417&cat=73287
  38. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. N-O 1888-1890, pg. 410, image 598, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-CQCY-C?cat=73287
  39. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. N-O 1888-1890, pg. 415, image 599, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z94M-Q?i=598&cat=73287
  40. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 614, image 347, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z94C-L?i=346&cat=73287
  41. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. P-Q, pg. 304, image 190, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z94C-L?i=346&cat=73287
  42. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. P-Q, pg. 388, image 238, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9NH-C?i=237&cat=73287
  43. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. P-Q 1890-1893, pg. 513, image 653, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9NB-8?i=674&cat=73287
  44. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 189, image 486, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z94S-Z?i=485&cat=73287
  45. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 380, image 582, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9WY-R?i=581&cat=73287
  46. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. P-Q 1890-1893, pg. 370, image 582, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9JS-6?i=581&cat=73287
  47. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. P-Q 1890-1893, pg. 21, image 502, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9JQ-S?i=501&cat=73287
  48. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. P-Q, pg. 304, image 190, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9J9-V?i=579&cat=73287
  49. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. P-Q 1890-1893, pg. 513, image 653, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9NT-K?i=652&cat=73287
  50. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. R-S, pg. 186 -187, image 122, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Q9T8-W?i=121&cat=73287
  51. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. R-S, pg. 188 -189, image 123, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Q9TF-P?i=122&cat=73287
  52. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. R-S 1892-1897, pg. 190 -191, image 124, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Q9TF-2?i=123&cat=73287
  53. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. R-S 1892-1897, pg. 319, image 188, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Q9T4-S?i=187&cat=73287
  54. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. L-M 1888-1896, pg. 585, image 684, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Z9WG-B?i=683&cat=73287
  55. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. R-S 1892-1897, pg. 364, image 548, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-Q9Y7-F?cat=73287
  56. Logan County, WV, Deed book, v. R-S 1892-1897, pg. 364, image 548, FamilySearch, not indexed. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSR7-8WQL-F?i=299&cat=73287
  57. https://archive.wvculture.org/vrr/va_dcdetail.aspx?Id=4545140
  58. Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/3061/william-anderson-hatfield: accessed 25 March 2023), memorial page for William Anderson “Devil Anse” Hatfield (9 Sep 1839–7 Jan 1921), Find a Grave Memorial ID 3061, citing Hatfield Family Cemetery, Sarah Ann, Logan County, West Virginia, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.
  • "United States Census, 1870," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MZ4G-71P : 12 April 2016), Anderson Hatfield, West Virginia, United States; citing p. 5, family 42, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Arc...
  • "West Virginia Births, 1853-1930," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VRXG-PNY : 12 March 2018), Wm. Anderson Hatfield in entry for Emanuel Willis Hatfield, 10 Feb 1888; citing Edgarton, Logan, West Virginia, United States, county courthouses, West Virginia; FHL microfilm 1,992,595.
  • "Kentucky Death Records, 1911-1967," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NSZ2-2R1 : 2 March 2021), William A. Hatfield in entry for Emma Stacey, 1939; citing Death, Hardy, Pike, Kentucky, United States, certificate , Office of Vital Statistics, Frankfort; FHL microfilm 1,913,360.
  • "West Virginia Deaths, 1804-1999," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NMD6-4JQ : 9 March 2018), William Anderson Hatfield in entry for Joe Davis Hatfield, 13 May 1963; citing Logan, Logan, West Virginia, County Records, v 12, county courthouses, West Virginia; FHL microfilm 571,282.

See also:

  • The Feud, film, American Experience, 10 September 2019, shown on PBS.




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Comments: 22

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I have a birth record I can put on for both Hatfield-260 & Hatfield-275 to further show that they are brothers born of the same father & supporting the 1850 census data, but I'm not just arbitrarily putting them on without asking first. Will it be a problem if I add them to the bottom of their respective sources? All I'm adding is a Source Citation at the bottom of the sources as I can't do in-line citations.

I talked to Eric on Discord & he said the best way to do this was to make the comment here about the birth source for William & then put the other 2 sources on Vals profile with another comment.

So to that end, here is the birth source I found for William & his father to strengthen the father/son connection, but more importantly in my case, to help strengthen the sources showing Val & William came from the same father. The 2 I will put on Vals porofile is their mother & father which supports census records:

  • Birth: "Family Data Collection - Births"

Ancestry Record 5769 #2043951 (accessed 10 January 2024) Anderson Hatfield born in 1839, child of Ephraim Hatfield & Nancy Vance, in WV, USA.

Thanks! Pat

posted by Pat Brunson
edited by Pat Brunson
Well, he was my 7th cousin, 2x removed through the Howard line!

But on Dad's side, distantly related to McCoy. We've all got amazing stories. p. s.: Explains the "family feuds" my Mom & Pop had! Lol.

posted by K (Beals) Kready
edited by K (Beals) Kready
Hi Stephanie!

The Appalachia Project now has a Project Profile and Number:

Please add the Project as a co-manager of this profile page so we can both protect this wonderful Appalachia Notable's profile. wikitree-appalachia-project <at> @googlegroups.com

Thank you!

posted by Sandy (Craig) Patak
A lot of the biography here is not correct. The Logan Wildcats were Company D of the 34th Virginia Infantry. That unit never operated within a hundred miles of Tug River, and Devil Anse was never a member of the unit. Asa Harmon McCoy was literally surrounded by his fellow Unionists, many of whom had deserted the 39th Kentucky earlier in that autumn. None of his near neighbors were Confederate. Asa Harmon McCoy was in the Home Guard and was seriously wounded in the chest in February, 1862. In November of that same year, he was captured by the Virginia State Line cavalry—including Devil Anse Hatfield—and sent to Libby Prison in Richmond. Paroled and discharged in April, 1863, he returned home, still recuperating from the old chest wound. In October of 1863, he traveled to Ashland and enlisted in the 45th Kentucky Infantry.

Discharged on Christmas Eve, 1864, Harmon immediately re-enlisted and was sent home on furlough. He was, according to the sworn testimony of his widow, “killed by rebels while on his way back to his regiment.” Neither Devil Anse or James Vance had anything to do with the killing of Asa.

posted by Steve Ballard
Hi Steve,

I know your comment is over a year old now, but I was wondering if you could help improve this profile and make it more historically accurate. I'm working on some various cleanup, but it looks like you know more about the correct history.

posted by Eric Weddington
I'll try to help out when I'm able. William's will take some time to clean up.
posted by Steve Ballard
I'm part of a Facebook group, that is suggesting that Devil Anse had a few children out of wedlock. Anything on this? Could have a lot of DNA connections we're not 100% aware of?

Sylvania Woldford, child: Vesta Hatfield

Amanda Murphy, child: Jane Hatfield

Elizabeth Mounts, children: Sarah Belle Mounts (DNA proven) and Moses Mounts

Helen McCoy, child Belle Blankenship

posted by Stephanie (Hatfield) Howes
edited by Stephanie (Hatfield) Howes
Hatfield-5395 and Hatfield-260 appear to represent the same person because: I do believe that my creation of Hatfield-5375 is the same as Hatfield-260, I sadly didn't create all the necessary information but they are the same person
William Anderson Hatfield is my third cousin.
An additional source is the PBS American Experience episode: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/feud/
posted by Dale (Yeary) Davidson
Hatfield-260 and Hatfield-3340 appear to represent the same person because: I believe the orphaned profile Hatfield-3340 was started by someone who did not know Anse's real name.
posted on Hatfield-3340 (merged) by Pam Frashure
Hatfield-3912 and Hatfield-260 appear to represent the same person because: same
posted by Pete Stark
Hatfield is 2nd cousin, 3x removed to George Washington, descendants of Augustine Warner Jr.
posted by Mark Burch
William Anderson Hatfield is my 15th cousin 5x removed, our common ancestor is Alexander Gordon.
posted by Micah McCoy
I have started the bio but it needs more plus I added some sources
posted by Terry Wright
We have now started a Hatfield and McCoy Project if any of the profile members are interested Terry
posted by Terry Wright
Just found out that William Anderson Hatfield is my 19th. cousin.On my Father Dewey Keene's side.
posted by [Living Keene]
Hatfield-697 and Hatfield-260 appear to represent the same person because: same person
posted by Charlotte Shockey
Hatfield-917 and Hatfield-260 appear to represent the same person because: birth dates and several other things match
posted by David Damron

Rejected matches › William Heathfield (1839-1921)