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Hąboguwįga (Hocąk) De Carrie (abt. 1710 - aft. 1766)

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Chief Hąboguwįga "Glory of the Morning, Queen of the Winnebagoes" De Carrie formerly Hocąk aka Decora
Born about in Menasha, Winnebago, Wisconsin Territorymap
Daughter of [father unknown] and [mother unknown]
[sibling(s) unknown]
Wife of — married [date unknown] [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died after in Wisconsinmap
Profile manager: Sunny Clark private message [send private message]
Profile last modified 30 Oct 2019 | Created 14 Aug 2016
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Hąboguwįga (Hocąk) De Carrie is a part of Wisconsin history.
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Hąboguwįga (Hocąk) De Carrie was a Native American and member of the Ho-Chunk tribe.

Biography

"Wisconsin Historical Society: Ho-poe-kaw (Glory of the Morning) Last Known Female Ho-Chunk Chief: 'The last known Ho-Chunk female chief, Ho-poe-kaw was chosen to lead her people around 1727, when she was 18... The following year she married Sabrevoir Descaris, a French officer who resigned his commission to become a fur trader.'" [1]

"Women's Wisconsin: from native matriarchies to the new millennium', by Genevieve G. McBride; Wisconsin Historical Society; 2006: 'In the 1700s, the last known woman chief of the Ho-Chunk was Ho-poe-kaw, or the Glory of the Morning of Wisconsin. The sister or daughter of a chief, she succeeded him as head of their largest village, east of Lake Winnebago—and she succeeded as a chief for decades despite devastating effects of diseases from explorers and warfare with other tribes forced westward. If women rarely were warriors, nevertheless war was women's story as well. Continued epidemics and economic instability as well as conflicts caused by explorers, traders, and settlers cost women their families, crops, lodges, villages, and even their lives. Ho-poe- kaw, however, stayed all her life in her homeland and stayed in power despite devastating personal losses. Ho-poe-kaw was not unusual among Native women in marrying a French Canadian in Wisconsin when the area was a colony of Nouvelle-France, or New France. Sabrevoir Descaris...'" [2]


"Our Debt to the Red Man: The French-Indians in the Development of the United States', by Louise Seymour Houghton; Stratford Company; 1918, p. 184: ' Angel De Cora Dietz, teacher of Indian Art at Carlisle, comes of a family long celebrated in Indian annals. Early in the eighteenth century (1729) a French officer, Sabrevoir De Carrie, married Wa-hopo-e-kan, a daughter of the principal chief of the Winnebagoes. Their son Chou-ke-ka, born in 1730, was known to the whites as Spoon De Kaury. He became hereditary chief of the tribe, and was always friendly with the whites, even when at war with other tribes. With Pierre Paquette, Lie Roy and other mixed-bloods, "noble old De Kaury," as Mrs. Kinzie calls him, helped to make the history of the Middle West by assisting the Government in treaties with the Indians. It was principally through his influence that the treaty of June 3, 1816 was negotiated, he being then long past eighty. He died that same year at Portage City. His wife, Flight-of-Geese, was daughter of the celebrated Winnebago chief Nawkaw (Walking Turtle). They left six sons and five daughters, whose blood runs in several well known metis families of Wisconsin and Minnesota — Grignon, Ecuyer, Le Roy and others. Their eldest son, Ko-noka, also called Scha-ship-ka-ka (War Eagle) was known in early Chicago as Old De Kaury or Greyheaded De Kaury. He was born in 1747, served in the British campaign against Sandusky in 1813 (says Mrs. Kinzie) signed the treaty of Prairie du Chien on behalf of the Winnebagoes in 1825, at Caledonia, the largest of the Winnebago villages, containing 100 lodges. Mrs. Kinzie says that he was believed to be 143 years old at his death. His son Cha-ge-ka-ka, or Little De Kaury, succeeded him as chief, but died within six months. He was the idol of the Indians but was very rebellious to the plan of government to remove the Winnebagoes to Nebraska. His younger brother Hopne-scha-ka (White Fiend) De Kaury succeeded in the chieftainship. [3]

"Access Genealogy - Indian History of Winneshiek County Iowa: 'Genealogy and History of the Decorah Family... Hopokoekau, or 'Glory of the Morning' also known as the Queen of the Winnebagoes, was the mother of a celebrated line of chiefs, all of whom, well known to border history, bore in some form the name Decorah. Her Indian name is also given as Wa-ho-po-e-kau. She was the daughter of one of the principal Winnebago chiefs. There is no record of the date of her birth or death. She became the wife of Sabrevoir De Carrie, who probably came to Wisconsin with the French army, in which he was an officer, in 1728. He resigned his commission in 1729, and became a fur-trader among the Winnebagoes, subsequently marrying “Glory of the Morning.” He was adopted into her clan and highly honored.

After seven or eight years, during which time two sons and a daughter were born to him, he left her, taking with him the daughter. The queen refused to go with her husband, and remained in her home with her two sons. “The result is to-day that one-half or two-thirds of the Winnebago tribe have more or less of the Decorah blood in their veins.”1 Through the intervening generations there has been no other mixture of Caucasian blood, so that the Decorahs of to-day are probably as nearly full-bloods as any Indians in any part of the country. De Carrie returned to Canada, re-entered the army, and was killed at Ste Foye in the spring of 1760. The daughter whom he took with him, became the wife of a trader, Constant Kerigoufili, whose son, Sieur Laurent Fily (so-called), died about 1846...'" [4]

"INDIAN HISTORY OF WINNESHIEK COUNTY', compiled by CHARLES PHILIP HEXOM; A.K. BAILEY & SON, INCORPORATED; DECORAH IOWA; 1913, p. 21: "Statement by Geo. W. Kingsley... 'Hopokoekau, or 'Glory of the Morning,' also known as the Queen of the Winnebagoes, was the mother of a celebrated line of chiefs, all of whom, well known to border history, bore in some form the name Decorah. Her Indian name is also given as Wa-ho-po-e-kau. She was the daughter of one of the principal Winnebago chiefs. There is no record of the date of her birth or death.

She became the wife of Sabrevoir De Carrie, who probably came to Wisconsin with the French army, in which he was an officer, in 1728. He resigned his commission in 1729, and became a fur-trader among the Winnebagoes, subsequently marrying "Glory of the Morning." He was adopted into her clan and highly honored. After seven or eight years, during which time two sons and a daughter were born to him, he left her, taking with him the daughter. The Queen refused to go with her husband, and remained in her home with her two sons. "The result is to-day that one-half or two-thirds of the Winnebago tribe have more or less of the Decorah blood in their veins."* Through the intervening generations there has been no other mixture of Caucasian blood, so that the Decorahs of to-day are probably as nearly full-bloods as any Indians in any part of the country.

De Carrie returned to Canada, re-entered the army, and was killed at Ste. Foye in the spring of 1760. The daughter whom he took with him, became the wife of a trader, Constant Kerigoufili, whose son, Sieur Laurent Fily (so-called), died about 1846. Captain Jonathan Carver, who visited the Queen in 1766, states that she received him graciously, and luxuriously entertained him during the four days he remained in her village, which "contained fifty houses." Her two sons,"Being the descendants of a chief on the mother's side, when they arrived at manhood assumed the dignity of their rank by inheritance..." [5]

"Wikipedia: 'Glory of the Morning... Glory of the Morning was the first woman ever described in the written history of Wisconsin,[1] and the only known female chief of the Hocąk (Winnebago) nation. At least one source has rendered her name as Hopokoekau, which is a corruption of Hąboguwįga, from hąp, "day"; ho-, "the time at which"; gu, "to come arriving"; -wį, an affix indicating the feminine gender; and -ga, a definite article used for personal names.[2] The name is conventionally translated as, "Glory of the Morning" or "The Coming Dawn." She was the daughter of the chief of the tribe,[3] and therefore a member of the Thunderbird Clan who lived in a large village on Doty Island in what is now Menasha. Sometime before 1730, the French—in connection with their development of the vast territory of Louisiana-- renewed contact with the tribe. A small force of French troops under the command of Sabrevoir De Carrie visited the Hocągara and established cordial relations. The opportunities of this contact impressed themselves upon De Carrie, who resigned his commission to become a fur trader among the tribe. It was around this time that he married Glory of the Morning. It cannot be established whether she was made chief before or after this marriage. Her marriage seems to have enhanced her status, as De Carrie is remembered very favorably in the Hocąk oral tradition, which says, "in his affairs he was most emphatically a leader of men...

Jonathan Carver, a Connecticut Yankee in the service of the Crown, paid a visit to her village in 1766, and gives an interesting account of her. On the 25th [of September] I left the Green Bay, and proceeded up Fox River, still in company with the traders and some Indians. On the 25th I arrived at the great town of the Winnebagoes, situated on a small island just as you enter the east end of Lake Winnebago. Here the queen who presided over this tribe instead of a Sachem, received me with great civility, and entertained me in a very distinguished manner, during the four days I continued with her. The day after my arrival I held a council with the chiefs, of whom I asked permission to pass through their country, in my way to more remote nations on business of importance. This was readily granted me, the request being esteemed by them as a great compliment paid to their tribe. The Queen sat in the council, but only asked a few questions, or gave some trifling directions in matters relative to the state; for women are never allowed to sit in their councils, except they happen to be invested with the supreme authority, and then it is not customary for them to make any formal speeches as the chiefs do. She was a very ancient woman, small in stature, and not much distinguished by her dress from several young women that attended her. These her attendants seemed greatly pleased whenever I showed any tokens of respect to their queen, particularly when I saluted her, which I frequently did to acquire her favour...

Having made some acceptable presents to the good old queen, and received her blessing, I left the town of the Winnebagoes on the 29th of September ...[8] Nothing is heard of her until the Kinzies visited her in 1832. She had lived to an unheard of age. Mrs. Kinzie paints a portrait of her:

'There was among their number, this year, one whom I had never before seen—the mother of the elder Day-kau-ray. No one could tell her age, but all agreed that she must have seen upwards of a hundred winters. Her eyes dimmed, and almost white with age—her face dark and withered, like a baked apple—her voice tremulous and feeble, except when raised in fury to reprove her graceless grandsons, who were fond of playing her all sorts of mischievous tricks, indicated the very great age she must have attained...'" [6]

"Indian Names on Wisconsin's Map', by Virgil J. Vogel; Univ of Wisconsin Press; 1991, p. 73: 'On Sept 25, 1766, Jonathan Carver, ascending the Fox River... arrived at Doty Island... reported, 'Here the Queen who resides over this Winnibago tribe instead of a sachem, received me with great civility, and entertained me in a very distinguished manner... we know her as Ho-po-koe-kaw, mistranslated as 'Glory of the Morning', a Winnebago woman who married the French officer Sabrevoie de Carrie and started the distinguished Decorah family... De Carrie was killed in battle against the British in Quebec, September 13, 1759, but his name, in the form Decorra, Decorah, Dekorra, etc., is still prominent among the Winnebago...'" [7]

"A history of Dickinson County, Iowa: together with an account of the Spirit Lake massacre, and the Indian troubles on the northwestern frontier...', by Roderick A. Smith; The Kenyon printing & mfg. co; 1902, pp. 20-21: '...The Dacotah tribes figuring in Iowa history are the Omahas, the Iowas, the Winnebagos and the Sioux...

...Another Dacotah tribe at one time residing in Iowa were the Winnebago. This tribe when first known were located west of Lake Michigan near Green Bay. Their history is a checkered one which cannot be repeated here. After the Black Hawk War they were removed from Wisconsin to the 'Neutral Ground' in Iowa, where they remained until 1846 when they were again removed to a reservation in Minnesota near Mankato. They remained there until after the Sioux outbreak in 1862 when they were sent to a reservation on the Missouri in South Dakota. Of their chiefs those who have been remembered by the people of Iowa are Winneshiek, Waukon Decorah, and One Eyed Decorah. It was the latter who delivered Black Hawk a prisoner to the United States Indian Agent at Prairie du Chien at the close of the Black Hawk War.

The main branch of the Dacotah race are called Sioux. Many persons consider the terms Sioux and Dacotah as applying to the same people. This is not strictly true, since several of the Dacotah tribes, as the Iowas and Winnebagos, and some others, have never been called Sioux. Still no great confusion of ideas can arise from using the terms as interchangeable. While the term Dacotah is the more comprehensive of the two, the term Sioux is the best known and the one with which the people are most familiar. These Indians originally occupied the western part of Wisconsin, the northern part of Iowa, the greater part of Minnesota, the whole of North and South Dakota, and much of the country west to the Rocky Mountains.

The first well authenticated meeting of the whites with the Dacotahs was in 1662, but for nearly fifty years previous to that time fabulous stories had reached the French on the St. Lawrence River of a wonderful people who dwelt far to the westward and who spoke a different language from any with which they were acquainted. These mysterious reports made such an impression on the mind of Champlain, the Governor of New France, that he determined to investigate. Accordingly in 1634 he induced Jean Nicollet to undertake a journey of exploration in the region beyond what had then been discovered. Nicollet's account of his journey reads like a fairy tale, but he did not succeed in reaching the Siouix on that trip. A very interesting paper by Hon. Irving B. Richman, entitled, 'First -Meeting with Dacotahs,' says: 'The first meeting of the Dacotah Indians by white men took place at a spot not so remote from the lake regions of Iowa. In 1662 the French travelers, Radison and Grosseliers, held a council with a large company of the Dacotahs near the Mille Lacs, in what is now the state of Minnesota. They were even then a famous and dreaded nation. Says Radison in his quaint and Gallic way: 'They were so much respected that nobody durst not offend them.'

'Eighteen years later or in 1680, the Mississippi River having been discovered in the meantime, Father Hennepin was sent out by La Salle to explore the upper regions of it. Judge Fulton, in his introduction to a chapter on the Sioux, uses this language: "It was in 1680 that Father Hennepin and his two companions, Michael Ako and Anthony Anguella, were sent from Fort Crevecour, near Lake Peoria, by the renowned La Salle on their mission of discovery to the upper Mississippi.'" [8]

Sources

  1. [1]
  2. [2]
  3. [3]
  4. [4]
  5. [5]
  6. [6]
  7. [7]
  8. [8]
  • "Wisconsin Historical Society. Wisconsin Local History & Biography: reprint of 'Stories of Wisconsin No. 19 Glory of the Morning', by M.M. Quaiffe, ed.; Wisconsin Historical Society; August 15, 1925 Newspaper item. [9]
  • "Wisconsin Historical Society. Wisconsin Local History & Biography Articles; reprint of "The Madison Democrat (2-21-1912): 'Glory of the Morning and the Decorah Family', by Louise Phelps Kellogg, PhD. (State Hiostorical Society)[10]


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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Hąboguwįga by comparing test results with other carriers of her mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known mtDNA test-takers in her direct maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Hąboguwįga:

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UNKNOWN-76001 and Hoc?k-1 appear to represent the same person because: duplicates
posted by Sunny (Trimbee) Clark

Hąboguwįga is 22 degrees from Mary Pickford, 21 degrees from Cheryl Skordahl and 19 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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