William Hodgson

William Hope Hodgson (1877 - 1918)

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William Hope Hodgson
Born in Blackmore End, Essex, England, United Kingdommap
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married (to ) in Kensington, London, Englandmap
Died in Ypres, Francemap
Profile last modified | Created 17 Aug 2013
This page has been accessed 244 times.

Categories: Royal Artillery | Battle of the Lys (1918) | British Army in World War I | British Notables.

Lt William Hodgson served in the British Army in World War I
Service started:
Unit(s): Royal Artillery
Service ended: April 1918
William Hodgson is Notable.

Contents

Biography

Early years and life at sea Hodgson was born in Blackmore End, Essex, the son of Samuel Hodgson, an Anglican priest, and Lissie Sarah Brown. He was the second of twelve children, three of whom died in infancy. The death of a child is a theme in several of Hodgson's works including the short stories "The Valley of Lost Children", "The Sea-Horses", and "The Searcher of the End House". Hodgson's father was moved frequently, and served 11 different parishes in 21 years, including one in County Galway, Ireland. This setting was later featured in Hodgson's novel The House on the Borderland. Hodgson ran away from his boarding school at the age of thirteen in an effort to become a sailor. He was caught and returned to his family, but eventually received his father's permission to be apprenticed as a cabin boy and began a four-year apprenticeship in 1891. Hodgson's father died shortly thereafter, of throat cancer, leaving the family impoverished; while William was away, the family subsisted largely on charity. After his apprenticeship ended in 1895, Hodgson began two years of study in Liverpool, and was then able to pass the tests and receive his mate's certificate; he then began several more years as a sailor. At sea, Hodgson experienced bullying. This led him to begin a program of personal training. According to Sam Moskowitz, The primary motivation of his body development was not health, but self-defence. His relatively short height and sensitive, almost beautiful face made him an irresistible target for bullying seamen. When they moved in to pulverize him, they would learn too late that they had come to grips with easily one of the most powerful men, pound for pound, in all England. The theme of bullying of an apprentice by older seamen, and revenge taken, appeared frequently in his sea stories. While away at sea, in addition to his exercises with weights and with a punching bag, Hodgson also practised his photography, taking photographs of cyclones, lightning, sharks, aurora borealis, and the maggots that infested the food given to sailors. He also built up a stamp collection, practised his marksmanship while hunting, and kept journals of his experiences at sea. In 1898 he was awarded the Royal Humane Society medal for heroism for saving another sailor who had fallen overboard in shark-infested waters.[1]

Sources

Footnotes

  1. Entered by Michael McCook.

Acknowledgments

Thanks to Michael McCook for starting this profile. Click the Changes tab for the details of contributions by Michael and others.



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William Hope Hodgson
William Hope Hodgson

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