Thomas  Hooker II

Thomas Hooker II (1586 - 1647)

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Reverend Thomas Hooker II
Born in Marefield, Tilton, Leicester, Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Amersham, Buckinghamshire, , Englandmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticutmap
Hooker-109 created 8 Apr 2011 | Last modified | Last edit: 16 Oct 2017
16:10: Rick Pierpont edited the Biography for Thomas Hooker II. [Thank Rick for this]
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Categories: Puritan Great Migration | Founders of Hartford | Puritan Ministers | Griffin, sailed 1633.

The Puritan Great Migration.
Thomas Hooker II migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
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Contents

Biography

Thomas Hooker II (July 5, 1586 – July 7, 1647) was a prominent Puritan religious and colonial leader remembered as one of the founders of the Colony of Connecticut.[1]. He has also been called "Father of American Democracy."[2].

He was probably born at Marefield, Tilton, Leicester, England to Thomas Hooker I.[3] Thomas Hooker won a scholarship to study at the University of Cambridge, where in time he became the equivalent of a professor of theology.[1] After Mr. Hooker's conversion to belief in the authenticity of Scripture and the saving grace of the Christ, his keenly reasoned reflections upon the meanings of Biblical passages and upon the life of a Christian helped his rise into the leadership of the Puritan movement in England. But this status as a leader in the Puritan movement would cause him to emigrate first to Holland and then to New England in 1633, on the ship Griffin, to escape the persecution of Archbishop William Laud for non-conformity.[4][1]

He was selected pastor of the church at Newtown (now Cambridge), Massachusetts.[5] He is thus attributed as being the first minister of the First Parish in Cambridge,[1] a church that still exists in the present day. His home was on a plot of land which today is part of the yard at Harvard College.(Citation?)

His departure from the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay (the nucleus of the present-day Commonwealth of Massachusetts) was one of the key events leading to the creation of the Colony of Connecticut (the nucleus of the present-day State of the same name). In 1635, he was appointed by the General Court of Massachusetts to try to persuade his friend Roger Williams to give up his controversial views. Hooker and Williams took part in a public debate but Williams refused to change his opinions.

In 1636, Thomas Hooker led his congregation west to found the new English settlement at Hartford, Connecticut. One of the reasons he left Massachusetts was his failure to agree with John Winthrop about who should take part in civil government. Winthrop held that only admitted members of the Church should vote and hold office; Hooker maintained that any adult male who owned property should be able to vote and participate in civil government, regardless of church membership.[1]

He and his party traveled on a trail that is now known as the Old Connecticut Path.[6] After settling in Hartford, Hooker continued to be in contact with John Winthrop and Roger Williams. Hooker traveled to Boston often to help settle inter-colonial disputes. He is also remembered for his role in creating the "Fundamental Orders of Connecticut". This document is one of the modern world's first written constitutions and an influence upon the current American Constitution, written nearly a century and a half later.[7]

His great-granddaughter Sarah Pierpont married Rev. Jonathan Edwards. Some other direct descendants of his included William Howard Taft, William Gillette, Edward H. Gillette, George Catlin, Emma Willard, and J.P. Morgan...".[1]

Research Notes

His mother should be removed, her name is unknown:

" Hooker, Thomas (7? July 1586-7 July 1647), Puritan minister, an architect of the New England Way, and a founder of Hartford, Connecticut, was born in Marfield, a village in Leicestershire, England, the son of Thomas Hooker, a steward for the Digby family, and his wife, whose name is unknown."[8]

"Hooker, Thomas (1586?–1647), minister in America, was probably born in 1586, possibly on 7 July, the son of Thomas Hooker (d. 1635), of Marfield (now Markfield), Leicestershire, a yeoman farmer and overseer of the Digby family's properties. His mother's name is unknown. Pre-seventeenth-century church records from Marfield are lost, but it is known that he had a brother, John, and two sisters, one perhaps called Anne, and Dorothy."[9]

Sources

  • Robert Charles Anderson, "Thomas Hooker",The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vol II, Boston, New England Historic Genealogical Society 1995 982-985
  • Barbour, Lucius Barnes. Families Of Early Hartford, Conn. (Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., Baltimore, Maryland and Connecticut Society of Genealogists, Inc., Glastonbury, Connecticut, 1982) pp.310

Footnotes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Wikipedia:Thomas_Hooker
  2. http://www.britannia.com/bios/hooker.html
  3. Great Migration Begins p. 982
  4. http://www.britannia.com/bios/hooker.html
  5. Great Migration Begins p. 982
  6. https://sites.google.com/site/oldconnecticutpath/
  7. Wikipedia: Fundamental_Orders_of_Connecticut
  8. Frank Shuffelton. "Hooker, Thomas"; American National Biography Online Feb. 2000.
  9. Sargent Bush, jun.,‘Hooker, Thomas (1586?–1647)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Jan 2008 , accessed 30 Nov 2016


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Images: 5
Founders Monument (1986)
Founders Monument (1986)

Thomas Hooker
Thomas Hooker

Center Church
Center Church

Ancient Burying Ground Cemetery
Ancient Burying Ground Cemetery

Hartford in 1640 prepared from the original records by vote of the town and drawn by William S. Porter. Image by The Connecticut Historical Society
Hartford in 1640 prepared from the original records by vote of the town and drawn by William S. Porter. Image by The Connecticut Historical Society

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On 30 Nov 2016 at 18:25 GMT Kirk Hess wrote:

His mothers name is not known and should be removed. I've added two citations from Oxford Sources (ODNB, American Biography Online)

According to the ODNB had a brother John, and two sisters Anne and Dorothy so Elizabeth, Frances and William also need their parents removed or some additional citations.

On 20 Jan 2014 at 14:27 GMT April (Dellinger) Dauenhauer wrote:

Hi Becky, John, Bob, Adele, Joe; I added titles and photo credits today. Would you like to have an image of the church Rev. Hooker founded in 1636? and image of the one built to replace it where he preached 1640 until his death? I'd be happy to add them. Please let me know. Thanks.

On 2 Nov 2013 at 11:42 GMT Becky (Nally) Syphers wrote:

November 2, 2013 - This profile is being edited and citations are being added. Please leave bulletin board messages with any comments today. Thanks



Thomas is 14 degrees from Kevin Bacon, 15 degrees from Joseph Broussard, 21 degrees from Helmut Jungschaffer and 15 degrees from Queen Elizabeth II Windsor on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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