Joseph Hooker

Joseph Hooker (1814 - 1879)

Privacy Level: Open (White)
Joseph "'Fighting Joe'" Hooker
Born in Hadley, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United Statesmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 1865 in Cincinnati, Ohiomap
[children unknown]
Died in Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, United Statesmap
Profile last modified 12 Feb 2020 | Created 20 Jun 2011
This page has been accessed 2,299 times.

Contents

Biography

Joseph Hooker served with the United States Army during the Mexican-American War
Service Started: 1837
Unit(s):
Service Ended: Sep 1, 1868
Joseph Hooker served in the United States Civil War.
Enlisted: 1837
Mustered out: Sep 1, 1866
Side: USA
Regiment(s): First Corps, 2nd Division of III Corps; Army of the Potomac
Roll of Honor
Joseph Hooker was Wounded in Action during the United States Civil War.

'A career United States Army officer and Mexican-American War veteran, Hooker was appointed in 1861 as a brigadier general of the Union Army. Hooker began the war commanding a division of the Army of the Potomac around Washington DC under Major General George McClellan.[1]

One of the most immodest and immoral of the high Union commanders, "Fighting Joe" Hooker frequently felt slighted by his superiors and requested to be relieved of duty. The Massachusetts native and West Pointer (1837) had been posted to the artillery but was serving as a staff officer when he won three brevets in Mexico. Unfortunately for his later career he testified against Winfield Scott before a court of inquiry on the Mexican War. After a two-year leave he resigned on February 21, 1853, to settle in California where he was in the farming and land businesses. [2]

Birth

Hooker was born in Hadley, Massachusetts on November 13, 1814, the son of Joseph Hooker, an unsuccessful businessman, and Mary Seymour. His great-grandfather, Joseph Hooker, fought in the French and Indian War (1755–1763), and his grandfather, also of the same name, was a captain in the Continental army during the Revolutionary War (1775–1783).[3] He was of entirely English ancestry, all of which had been in New England since the early 1600s.[4] His initial schooling was at the local Hopkins Academy.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Hooker was a bachelor with a reputation for drinking, gambling, womanizing, and hotheadedness.[3]

Military Career

He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1837, ranked 29th out of a class of 50, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 1st U.S. Artillery.

As commander of the Army of the Potomac, Hooker improved conditions for the soldiers including food, medical care, and leave. However, disagreements with his staff and commanders along with a loss to Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee at Chancellorsville, Virginia led to Hooker’s resignation as the commander of the Army of the Potomac.[1]

His assignments included:[5]

Brigadier General, USV (August 3, 1861, to rank from May 17);
Commanding Brigade, Division of the Potomac (August - October 3, 1861);
Commanding Civision, Army of the Potomac (October 3, 1861 -March 13, 1862);
Commanding 2nd Division, 3rd Corps, Army of the Potomac (March 13 - September 5, 1862);
Major General, USV (May 5, 1862);
Commanding 3rd Corps, Army of Virginia (September 6-12, 1862);
Commanding lst Corps, Army of the Potomac (September 12-17, 1862);
Brigadier General, USA (September 20, 1862);
Joseph Hooker is wounded in the foot at the Battle of Antietam.(September 17, 1862 )
Commanding 5th Corps, Army of the Potomac (November 10-16, 1862);
Commanding Center Grand Division, Army of the Potomac (November 16, 1862-January 26, 1863);
Commanding Department and Army of the Potomac (January 26 - June 28, 1863); commanding llth and 12th Corps, Army of the Cumberland (September 25 - April 14, 1863);
Commanding 20th Corps, Army of the Cumberland (April 14 - July 28, 1864); and
Commanding Northern Department (October 1, 1864 - June 27, 1865). [2]
Joseph Hooker asks to be relieved from field service in the Union army after being passed over for promotion. He serves as a departmental commander through the end of the war. (July 1864)
Joseph Hooker retires from the U.S. Army after suffering a stroke. (October 15, 1868)
Joseph Hooker dies in Garden City, New York, and is buried in Cincinnati, Ohio. (October 31, 1879)

Brevetted major general in the regular army for Chattanooga, he was mustered out of the volunteers on September 1, 1866, and two years later was retired with the increased rank of major general. Always popular with his men, he lacked the confidence of his subordinate officers and was quarrelsome with his superiors. His nickname, which he never liked, resulted from the deletion of a dash in a journalistic dispatch that was discussing the Peninsula Campaign and "Fighting" was thereafter linked to his name. Popular legend has it that his name was permanently attached to prostitutes from his Civil War actions in rounding them up in one area of Washington. He died in Garden City, New York, on October 31, 1879, and is buried in Cincinnati. (Herbert, Walter H., Fighting Joe Hooker) [5]

Marriage

Husband: Joseph Hooker
Wife: Olivia Augusta Groesbeck Hooker
Marriage Date: 1865
Marriage Place: Cincinnati, Ohio[6]

Death

Mustered out of service in 1866, he retired from the Army in 1868, He died on a visit to Garden City, New York, and is buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio,[7]

While visiting Garden City, New York in 1879, he died from apoplexy at the age of 64. [6]

Date of Death: Oct. 31, 1879
Place of Death: Garden City, Nassau County, New York, USA[6]
Burial:
Cemetery: Spring Grove Cemetery
Place: Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, USA
Plot: Section 30, Lot A[6]

Legacy

  • Hooker was honored with an equestrian statue erected near the Massachusetts State House in Boston and Hooker County, Nebraska was named after him.

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 Civil War Biographies Joseph Hooker
  2. 2.0 2.1 Civil War: Hook Biography
  3. 3.0 3.1 Encyclopedia of Virginia: Joseph Hooker
  4. >Homes of the Massachusetts ancestors of Major General Joseph Hooker By Isaac Paul Gragg.
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Who Was Who In The Civil War" by Stewart Sifakis. Last accessed March 10, 2015.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Find A Grave: Memorial #4450 for Joseph Hooker] (bio by: K Guy)
  7. Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher. Civil War High Commands. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001 his wife's home town.
  • Wikipedia:Joseph_Hooker
  • "Iowa, Grand Army of the Republic Membership Records, 1861-1949," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q23N-3VYH : 2 June 2016), Joseph Hooker, 1861-1949; citing Iowa, United States, Military Service, State Historical Department, Des Moines; FHL microfilm 1,487,413.
  • "United States Census, 1820", database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHGM-NWT : 16 July 2015), Joseph Hooker, 1820.
  • Leach, F. Phelps, 1932. Additions & Corrections for Thomas Hungerford of Hartford & New London, Conn. and his Descendants in American. Published by the author, East Highgate, Vermont, page 40


Acknowledgements



More Genealogy Tools



Sponsored Search




Is Joseph your ancestor? Please don't go away!
 star icon Login to collaborate or comment, or
 star icon contact private message the profile manager, or
 star icon ask our community of genealogists a question.
Sponsored Search by Ancestry.com

DNA
No known carriers of Joseph's ancestors' DNA have taken a DNA test.

Have you taken a DNA test? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.

Comments: 2

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.
Beautifully organized and interesting. Can we make the Notables_Project one of its project managers, please? Perhaps he should be protected, thanks.
I am working on the Civil War project in WikiTree and focusing on the Battle of Chancellorsville. Joseph Hooker was one of the primary Generals in this battle. I would like to be added to the Trusted List so I add more to his biography and link him to the project and images.
posted by Vicki Norman

Joseph is 19 degrees from Donald Howard, 13 degrees from Julia Howe and 13 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.