Roger Huntingfield

Roger Huntingfield (bef. 1200 - 1257)

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Sir Roger Huntingfield aka de Huntingfield
Born before in Suffolk, East Bradenham, Norfolk, Boxworth, Cambridgemap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 1236 in Huntingfield, Blything, Suffolkmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Huntingfield, Suffolkmap
Profile last modified 11 Sep 2019 | Created 22 Mar 2012 | Last significant change: 13 Sep 2019
15:59: Michael Cayley edited a message from Michael Cayley on the page for Roger Huntingfield (bef.1200-1257). [Thank Michael for this]
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Roger Huntingfield is a descendant of a Magna Carta surety baron.
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Contents

Biography

Roger was born before 1200[1]; he was of age on 25 January 1221 when he paid a fine of 100 marks to King Henry III to receive his inheritance from his father.[2] He was the son of Sir William de Huntingfield of Huntingfield, Suffolk, who was a Surety Baron for the Magna Carta. William's mother was the wife of Sir William, Isabel de Gressenhall, the daughter of William FitzWalter de Gressenhall and the widow of both Berenger de Cressy and Osmund de Stuteville.[3]

Roger married a woman named Lucy, who died without issue.[1] He then married Joan Hobrugge, the daughter and co-heiress of William de Howbridge of Howbridge, Essex. Roger and Joan had three sons and a daughter:

As heir to her father, Joan received the manor of Howbridge, which remained in the Huntingfield family for at least the next five generations.[4]

Roger purchased Huntingfeld Hall in Norfolk from John de Lacey, the Earl of Lincoln, in 1230.[5]

On 24 December 1240, King Henry III issued a decree stating that Roger and his wife, Joan, were to pay two marks for not responding to a summons to the court of the Earl of Hereford during the Octaves of St. Hilary.[6]

In 1242, Roger paid a fine of 200 marks so that he could avoid military service in Gascony.[1][7] However, he did not completely ignore the king's needs:

"It being represented to King Henry III. in his 39th year, that Roger de Huntingfield had sent to his assistance in Gascoign, And. de Gayzi, his knight, who had performed laudable service, the sheriff of Suffolk had an order that the demand of 60 marks due from him to the King should be excused." [8]

On 14 April 1253, King Henry III granted to Roger and his heirs:[9]

"free warren in all the demesne lands which he holds at present in Norfolk, Suffolk, Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire, provided that they are not within the king's forests ; grant also of a weekly market on Thursday at his manor of Petrestre, co. Suffolk, and of a yearly fair there on the vigil and the feast of SS. Peter and Paul and the two days following."

Sir Roger de Huntingfield died on 19 June 1257.[1][3] An Inquisition Post Mortem was initiated the following 10 July that listed his holdings in the counties of Lincolnshire and Suffolk. His son, William was specified as his heir.[10]

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 4 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. 2nd edition. Salt Lake City: the author, 2011, Vol. II, pp. 437-439, HUNTINGFIELD 2
  2. Excerpta et Rotulis Finium; Henrico Tertio Rege, A.D. 1216 - 1276, London, England: The Commissioners of the Public Records of the Kingdom, Volume I, 1835, p 60, Hathi Trust
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Douglas Richardson. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham (Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013), Vol III, pp 374-379.
  4. G Wrottesley. Pedigrees from the Plea Rolls. 1905. p 86, Internet Archive
  5. Francis Blomfield. An Essay towards a Topographical History for the County of Norfolk. London, England: William Miller, 1807, Volume VI, p 136, Google Books
  6. Excerpta et Rotulis Finium; Henrico Tertio Rege, A.D. 1216 - 1276, Volume I, p 333, Hathi Trust
  7. W A Copinger. The Manors of Suffolk, Manchester, England: Taylor, Garnett, Evans & Co. Ltd., Volume 2, 1908, p 101, Internet Archive
  8. Francis Blomefield. 'Tunstede Hundred: Bacton' in An Essay Towards A Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: Volume 11, London: W Miller, 1810, pp. 17-21, British History Online, accessed March 19, 2016
  9. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Calendar of Charter Rolls; Henry III, A.D. 1226 - 1257, London England: His Majesty's Stationery Office, Volume I, 1903, p 429, Internet Archive
  10. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Inquisitions Post Mortem; Henry III. London, England: His Majesty's Stationery Office, Volume I, 1904, p 107, Hathi Trust
  • Richardson, Douglas. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 4 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. 2nd edition. Salt Lake City: the author, 2011. See also WikiTree's source page for Magna Carta Ancestry.
  • Richardson, Douglas. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. Salt Lake City: the author, 2013. See also WikiTree's source page for Royal Ancestry.

Acknowledgements

Click the Changes tab to see edits to this profile. Thank you to everyone who contributed to this profile.

Magna Carta Project

Magna Carta ancestry
Richard Clopton is in a trail from Magna Carta Surety Baron William de Huntingfield to Gateway Ancestor William Clopton that was approved for the Magna Carta Project on 6 September 2019 by Michael Cayley. This profile was developed in accordance with project standards (by a former Gateway Guardian of William Clopton). See Base Camp for more information about Magna Carta trails.
If you are interested in being a Gateway Guardian, or joining the project (or both), please post a comment to WikiTree-36, answer "yes" to the project's G2G "join" post (to join the project), or contact me. ~ David Douglass
Magna Carta Trail
  1. William Clopton is the son of William Clopton
  2. William Clopton is the son of Walter Clopton
  3. Walter Clopton is the son of William Clopton
  4. William Clopton is the son of Richard Clopton
  5. Richard Clopton is the son of Thomasine (Knyvet) Clopton
  6. Thomasine (Knyvet) Clopton is the daughter of Thomas Knyvet
  7. Thomas Knyvet is the son of John Knyvet
  8. John Knyvet is the son of Thomas Knyvet
  9. Thomas Knyvet is the son of Robert Knyvet
  10. Robert Knyvet is the son of Eleanor (Basset) Knyvet
  11. Eleanor (Basset) Knyvet is the daughter of Ralph Basset
  12. Ralph Basset is the son of Joan (Huntingfield) Basset
  13. Joan (Huntingfield) Basset is the daughter of Roger Huntingfield
  14. Roger Huntingfield is the son of William Huntingfield
  15. William Huntingfield is the son of Roger Huntingfield
  16. Roger Huntingfield is the son of Surety Baron William (Huntingfield) de Huntingfield


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On 11 Sep 2019 at 17:34 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

Magna Carta project logo
100% 5-star profile (see more at Magna Carta Project Star Profiles)

On 6 Sep 2019 at 13:36 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

I have now finished my review of this profile for the Magna Carta Project

On 2 Sep 2019 at 18:59 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

I will be doing a little work on this profile as part my review for the Magna Carta Project of the trail from William Clopton to Surety Baron William de Huntingfield.

Roger is 27 degrees from Cari Starosta, 19 degrees from Marie-Antoinette d'Autriche and 12 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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Categories: Magna Carta | Huntingfield-11 Descendants