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William Huntingfield (1237 - bef. 1290)

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Sir William Huntingfield aka de Huntingfield
Born in Englandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married before 1260 in Huntingfield, Blything, Suffolkmap [uncertain]
Descendants descendants
Died before in Englandmap
Profile last modified 11 Sep 2019 | Created 22 Mar 2012
This page has been accessed 1,731 times.
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William Huntingfield is a descendant of a Magna Carta surety baron.
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Contents

Biography

William Huntingfield was a member of aristocracy in the British Isles.

William was born on 24 August 1237,[1] the son of Roger de Huntingfield of Huntingfield and his wife, Joan de Howbridge, daughter of William de Howbridge of Howbridge.[2][3]

William's father died on 19 June 1257,[2][3] and on 22 October 1257, his mother paid 100 marks into the royal treasury to become the guardian of William's inheritance.[4] The fine of 100 marks was so burdensome that the king issued instructions on 7 February 1258 to the tenants of the lands under her guardianship to bring "competent aid" to Lady Joan so that she could maintain their "mutual tranquility and advantage".[5]

In 1258, William served in an expedition to Wales.[3]

Sometime before 1260, William married Emma de Grey, the daughter of Sir John de Grey of Shirland. Emma brought to the marriage the Manor of Bacton in Norfolk and the advowson of Alderton in Suffolk.[2][3]

William and Emma had at least two sons and maybe a third, Sir Saier de Huntingfield[2][3]:

William's wife is said to have died in 1264.[2][3][6]

On 20 January 1264, King Henry III issued a writ that named William along with eight of his fellow barons responsible for "injuries, damages, and violences [sic]" against the church and ecclesiastical persons within the province of Canterbury and that they must make "competent amends" before the next Sunday. It was not recorded if the amends were provided, but the date of next Sunday may have been impossible as the writ was issued from Amiens, France.[7]

During the Second Barons' War,[8] William joined the barons under the leadership of Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, against King Henry III. He fought on the side of the barons in their decisive loss at the battle of Evesham on 4 August 1265.[9][10]

As a result of his participation in the Second Barons' War, William seems to have been placed on the equivalent of house arrest; he had to receive safe conduct from the king when he went afield. On 12 January 1266/7, King Henry III issued a writ giving him safe conduct to visit him at court until the Octaves of Purification (3 - 5 February)[11] provided he stood trial for his deeds during the recently concluded war.[12] William also received royal writs of safe conduct, usually to attend court and seek peace with the king, on 3 February, 12 February, 9 July, and 2 August.[13] The last of these covered the period ending on the Octaves of Michaelmas (6 - 12 October) of 1266; thus, William was free to travel to the king's court for most of the first three quarters of the year.

During the Octaves of Holy Trinity in 1277, William entered into a covenant with Sir John d'Engaine of Colne Engaine, Essex that betrothed Sir John's eldest daughter, Joyce d'Engaine, with his eldest son, Roger de Huntingfield. The covenant specified:

  1. that Sir William would give to Joyce land valued at £40 annually from his manor of Suthorp,
  2. that Sir John would give to Roger land of equivalent value from his manor of Wyvelisthorn, and
  3. that Sir John would give Sir William 300 marks to seal the agreement.

The covenant was further complicated by the fact that Wyvelisthorn (Wilstone)[14] was the inheritance of Sir John's wife, Lady Joan, which necessitated an additional covenant among Sir William, Sir John and Lady Joan that they were all in good faith with the original covenant.[15] The marriage was conducted in either May or June of 1277. However, the marriage settlements later were contested by each family, and they were only revised and confirmed on 28 August 1279.[3]

William received several royal summonses after he was taken back into the king's good grances:[16]

Summons dateOrderReport dateReport location
12 December 1276Military service against The Prince of Wales1 July 1277Worcester
6 April 1282Military service against the Welsh17 May 1282Worcester
24 May 1282Military service against the Welsh2 August 1282 Rhuddlan
14 March 1283Military service against the Welsh2 May 1283Montgomery
20 June 1283Parliament30 September 1283Shrewsbury
14 June 1287Military council12 July 1287Gloucester

Sometime before 2 November 1290, Sir William died[2][3], and King Edward I took the lands of Sir William's estate under royal control.[17] Cockayne, citing Harleian Manuscript 506,[18] says that he died in 1283.

Research Note

  • Sir William's death date, 1283, as stated in Cockayne[18] precedes his summons to the military council in Gloucester[19] by approximately four years.
  • It would be very useful if more documentation of William's activities during the Second Barons' War and of his trial can be added to this profile.
  • Neither the birth nor death places for William are documented. Earlier contributors to this profile have suggested that he was born at Huntingfield, Byng Hall in Pettistree, & Mendham, Suffolk and that he died at East Bradenham, Norfolk.
  • None of the sources given below, other than Richardson and Cockayne, state that William was a knight. Is there primary sourcing for this?

Sources

  1. Charles Roberts (Editor). Calendarium Genealogicum; Henry III & Edward I. London, England: Longmans, Green & Co., 1865. Volume I, p 76.Internet Archive
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 4 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. 2nd edition. Salt Lake City: the author, 2011, Vol. II, pp. 439-440, HUNTINGFIELD 3
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols., ed. Kimball G. Everingham, Salt Lake City, Utah: the author, 2013, Vol III, pp 377-380
  4. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Calendar of the Patent Rolls; Henry III A. D. 1247-1258. London, England: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1908, p. 582, Google Books
  5. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Calendar of the Patent Rolls; Henry III A. D. 1247-1258. London, England: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1908, p 66, Google Books
  6. William Dugdale. Monasticon Angelicanum, Volume V, London, England: Privately published, 1825, p 56, Hathi Trust
  7. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Calendar of Patent Rolls; Henry III, A. D. 1258-1266, London, England: His Majesty's Stationery Office: 1910. p 378, University of Iowa website
  8. Wikipedia: Second Barons' War, accessed 30 Oct 2018
  9. W A Copinger. The Manors of Suffolk, Volume 2, Manchester, England: Taylor, Garnett, Evans & Co. Ltd., 1908, p. 101, Internet Archive
  10. Wikipedia: Battle of Evesham, accessed 30 Oct 2018.
  11. Google Books, accessed 30 Oct 2018
  12. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Calendar of Patent Rolls; Henry III, A. D. 1258-1266, London, England: His Majesty's Stationery Office: 1910. pp 529-530, Hathi Trust
  13. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Calendar of Patent Rolls; Henry III, A. D. 1258-1266. London, England: His Majesty's Stationery Office: 1910. pp 542, 550-551, 634, & 669, Hathi Trust
  14. William Page (Editor). The Victoria History of Hertfordshire, London, England: Archibald Constable & Co., 1908, Volume II, p 286, Hathi Trust
  15. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Calendar of Close Rolls; Edward I 1272 -1279, London, England: Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1900. pp 571-572, Hathi Trust
  16. Francis Palgrave. The Parliamentary Writs and Writs of Military Service, London, England: Record Commission, 1827, Volume I, p 677, Google Books
  17. The Deputy Keeper of the Records. Calendar of the Fine Rolls, London, England: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1911, Volume I, p 286, Hathi Trust
  18. 18.0 18.1 Cockayne, G. E. The Complete Peerage, new edition, Volume VI, London, England: St. Catherine Press, 1926, pp 664-666
  19. Francis Palgrave. The Parliamentary Writs and Writs of Military Service, London, England: Record Commission, 1827, Volume I, p 250, Google Books
  • Richardson, Douglas. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 4 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. 2nd edition. Salt Lake City: the author, 2011. See also WikiTree's source page for Magna Carta Ancestry.
  • Richardson, Douglas. Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 vols, ed. Kimball G. Everingham. Salt Lake City: the author, 2013. See also WikiTree's source page for Royal Ancestry.
  • Blomefield, Francis. 'Tunstede Hundred: Bacton', in An Essay Towards A Topographical History of the County of Norfolk, Volume 11 (London: W Miller, 1810), pp. 17-21, British History Online, accessed March 19, 2016

Acknowledgements

Click the Changes tab to see edits to this profile. Thank you to everyone who contributed to this profile.

Magna Carta Project

Magna Carta ancestry
This profile is in a trail from Magna Carta Surety Baron William de Huntingfield to Gateway Ancestor William Clopton that was approved for the Magna Carta Project on 6 September 2019 by Michael Cayley. It was developed in accordance with project standards (by a former Gateway Guardian of William Clopton). See Base Camp for more information about Magna Carta trails.
If you are interested in being a Gateway Guardian, or joining the project (or both), please post a comment to WikiTree-36, answer "yes" to the project's G2G "join" post (to join the project), or contact me. ~ David Douglass
Magna Carta Trail
  1. William Clopton is the son of William Clopton
  2. William Clopton is the son of Walter Clopton
  3. Walter Clopton is the son of William Clopton
  4. William Clopton is the son of Richard Clopton
  5. Richard Clopton is the son of Thomasine (Knyvet) Clopton
  6. Thomasine (Knyvet) Clopton is the daughter of Thomas Knyvet
  7. Thomas Knyvet is the son of John Knyvet
  8. John Knyvet is the son of Thomas Knyvet
  9. Thomas Knyvet is the son of Robert Knyvet
  10. Robert Knyvet is the son of Eleanor (Basset) Knyvet
  11. Eleanor (Basset) Knyvet is the daughter of Ralph Basset
  12. Ralph Basset is the son of Joan (Huntingfield) Basset
  13. Joan (Huntingfield) Basset is the daughter of Roger Huntingfield
  14. Roger Huntingfield is the son of William Huntingfield
  15. William Huntingfield is the son of Roger Huntingfield
  16. Roger Huntingfield is the son of Surety Baron William (Huntingfield) de Huntingfield


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On 11 Sep 2019 at 17:35 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

Magna Carta project logo
100% 5-star profile (see more at Magna Carta Project Star Profiles)

On 2 Sep 2019 at 18:56 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

I have now finished my review of this profile for the Magna Carta Project

On 29 Aug 2019 at 13:56 GMT Michael Cayley wrote:

I will be doing a little work on this profile as part my review for the Magna Carta Project of the trail from William Clopton to Surety Baron William de Huntingfield.

William is 27 degrees from Cari Starosta, 18 degrees from Marie-Antoinette d'Autriche and 11 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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Categories: Huntingfield-11 Descendants | Battle of Evesham | Magna Carta