Jacob Laswell
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Jacob Laswell (1698 - aft. 1766)

Jacob Laswell
Born in Anne Arundel, Marylandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Son of and [mother unknown]
Husband of — married 29 Oct 1724 in All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel, Marylandmap
Husband of — married 1731 in VAmap
Descendants descendants
Died after in Loudoun County, Colony of Virginiamap
Profile manager: Lois Staggs private message [send private message]
Profile last modified | Created 29 Jan 2012
This page has been accessed 529 times.

Biography

Jacob was born about1698. Jacob Laswell ... He passed away after 1766.[1]

Marriages:

(1) On October 29, 1724, Jacob Lasswell married Rebecca Beecraft at the All Hallows Church, Anne Arundel Maryland.[2]
(2) After Rebecca's death, Jacob married Elizabeth (likely LNAB Slater).

Maryland Records:

Jacob Laswell appears on a list of Sundry Debtors dated June 9, 1737 owing 3 gold to Richard Hill who had assigned the debt to Samule Preston Moore.[3]

Virginia Land Grants:

On March 15, 1728/1729, Jacob Lasswell received a Virginia Land Grant for 140 acres beginning on the upper side of Goose Creek in Stafford County, Colony of Virginia.[4] [5]

On December 6, 1731, Jacob Lasswell received a Virginia Land Grant for 436 acres beginning on the north side of a branch of Goose Creek in Prince William County, Colony of Virginia. Thomas Owens assigned his rights in a Warrant dated July 7, 1730 to Jacob Lasswell on August 21, 1732.[6]

On April 9, 1742, Jacob Laswell received a Virginia Land Grant for 670 acres beginning by the south side of Beaverdam Branch of Goose Creek in Prince William County, Colony of Virginia.[7] The Land Grant adjoined his brother John Laswell's land.

On June 17, 1744, Jacob Lasswell received a Virginia Land Grant for 270 acres adjoining Carters land and on Goose Creek in Fairfax County, Colony of Virginia.[8][9]

Deeds:

By instrument dated November 19, 1731, Jacob Lasswell of Hamilton Parish, Prince William County, Colony of Virginia, in consideration of "Love, Goodwill & Affection", conveyed 140 ac on the upper side of Goose Creek, to George Slater, Planter, of the same county.[10]

Leases:

By instrument dated May 4, 1733, Jacob Laswell of Prince Wililam County, Vrignia, leased 436 ac of land upon which he recently dwelt on the upper side of Goose Creek, near Seaglins Branch, to John Mercer, Gent. of Stafford County, Virginia.[11]

By instrument dated November 23, 1738, John Matthews of the County of Prince William, Colony of Virginia, of 5 shillings silver, released Jacob Lasswell of the same county from a lease of a tract of 124 ac. along Goose Creek in Prince William County. Following the release is an Novmber 4, 1733 lease of the land from Matthews to Lasswell. [12]

By instrument dated October 2, 1743 Edward Sleator of the County of Farifax, Colony of Virginia, of 5 shillings silver, released Jacob Lasswell of the same county from a lease of a tract of 140 ac. in Fairfax County. The deed recites that the land was originally patented to Jacob Lasswell by the Proprietors on March 15, 1728/29 and then conveyed by Jacob Lasswell to Edward Sleator by deed of gift recorded in County Court on November 19, 1731. Following the release is an October 21, 1742 lease of the land from Sleator to Lasswell. [13]

By instrument executed on September 18, 1744, Jacob Lasswell and Elizabeth, his wife, of the County of Fairfax, Colony of Virginia, released Walter Williams, Planter, of the same county from a lease of 270 ac. in Fairfax County originally patented to Jacob Lasswell by the Proprietors on June 7, 1744 and recorded in Proprietors Book F, p. 160. The consideration was 5,000 lbs of tobacco. [14]

By instrument executed on April 26, 1745, Jacob Lasswell, Yeoman, and Elizabeth his wife, of the County of Fairfax, Colony of Virginia, released Amos Janney, Yeoman, of the same county from a lease of a tract of land along Beaver Dam Creek, a branch of Goose Creek, in the same county. It is recited that the lands were originally patented to Jacob Lasswell by the Proprietors of Vriginia as recorded in Book E, Folio 436. [15]

By instrument executed on August 1, 1745, Jacob Lasswell, Carpenter, of the County of Fairfax, Colony of Virginia, released John Graham, Gent., of Prince William County from a lease of 412 ac. in Fairfax County in Truro Parish.[16]

Rent Rolls:

Jacob Laswell appeared on the 1761 Rent Roll for Loudoun County, Virginia.[17]

Records of Truro Parish:

By instrument dated February 28, 1739, recorded April 13, 1739 in the Vestry Minutes of Truro Parish, Benjamin Chandler, son of William Chandler, was apprenticed through age 21 in conformance with an order of the Prince William County Court, to Jacob Laswell to learn the trade of carpentry and to speak and write english.[18]

By instrument dated February 28, 1739, recorded April 13, 1739 in the Vestry Minutes of Truro Parish, William Chandler, son of William Chandler, was apprenticed through age 21 in conformance with an order of the Prince William County Court, to Jacob Laswell to learn the trade of carpentry and to speak and write english.[18]

On July 21, 1743, Jacob Lasswell, a reputable freeholder, was named as a Processioner between the north east and north west forks of Goose Creek.[18][19]

Deposition in 1766 case:

On August 14, 1766, Francis Hauge filed a Chancery Case in Loudoun County Court against several parties including John Laswell's only surviving daughter Mary "Caudrey" and her husband Thomas Caudrey. The file contains several depositions including an undated deposition of John's brother Jacob Laswell, then age 63. From a genealogical standpoint, the case file confirms several important relationships.[20]

Research Notes

Is George Slater the father of Jacob's wife Elizabeth Slater?

Sources

  1. Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia's Northern Neck Counties
  2. Maryland State Archives, Church Records, Marriages Available here
  3. Maryland Provinical Court Records, Maryland State Archives Available here
  4. Virginia, Northern Neck Land Grants, Book A, p. 218 Available here
  5. Virginia Land Grant, March 1728/28 Available here
  6. Virginia Land Grant, Dec. 6, 1731 Available here
  7. Virginia Land Grant, April 9, 1742 Available here
  8. Virginia Land Grant, June 17, 1744 Available here
  9. Virginia, Northern Neck Land Grants, Book F, p. 180 Available here
  10. Virginia, Prince William Deed Book A, p. 161 Available here
  11. Virginia, Prince William, Deed Book B, p.73 Available here
  12. Virginia, Fairfax, Deed Book A. p. 142 [https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4V-BSFQ-R?i=81&cat=202100
  13. Virginia, Fairfax, Deed Book A. p. 142 [https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4V-BSFQ-R?i=81&cat=202100
  14. Virginia, Fairfax, Deed Book A. p. 256 Available here
  15. Virginia, Fairfax, Deed Book A. p. 422 Available here
  16. Virginia, Fairfax, Deed Book A. p. 484 Available here
  17. King, J.S., Abstracts of wills, inventories and administration accounts of Loudoun County, Virginia, 1757-1800 : will books A-F, p. 86 Available here
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 Truro Parish Colonia Vestry Book, p. 29, 30, 43 Available here
  19. Slaughter, Philip and Edward Lewis Goodwin. History of Truro Parish in Virginia. Philadelphia, PA: George W. Jacobs, 1907. p. 20 Available here
  20. Francis Hague vs. Joseph Combs, etc., Loudoun County Chancery Court, Virginia, Case. No. 1773-001, Depo. of Walter Williams, p. 12 Available here
  • OneWorldTree, Ancestry.com. One World Tree (sm) [database online]. Provo, UT: MyFamily.com, Inc.


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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Jacob by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share some percentage of DNA with Jacob:

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