no image
Privacy Level: Open (White)

Marguerite LeBlanc (abt. 1676 - aft. 1740)

Marguerite LeBlanc
Born about in Port-Royal, Acadie, Nouvelle-Francemap
Ancestors ancestors
Wife of — married about 1692 in Acadiamap
Descendants descendants
Died after in Acadie, Colony of Nova Scotiamap
Profile last modified | Created 27 May 2010 | Last significant change: 26 Nov 2020
23:45: EditBot WikiTree edited the Biography for Marguerite LeBlanc (abt.1676-aft.1740). (Correcting 139_103_17_56) [Thank EditBot for this]
This page has been accessed 1,831 times.
The Acadian flag.
Marguerite LeBlanc is an Acadian.
Join: Acadians Project
Discuss: ACADIA

Biography

NOTICE: this profile is protected by the Acadian Project because it is a frequently conflated profile and one of the HIghly Viewed Acadian profiles. Please feel free to add documented information with sources. To add relatives, please contact the Acadian Project or make a comment on this profile. Thanks for helping make WikiTree the best site for accurate information.

Marguerite LeBlanc, daughter of Jacques LeBlanc & Catherine Hebert, was born about 1676 in Port-Royal, Acadie.[1] She was the second oldest child in a family of 13. Marguerite was counted in the 1686 census of Port-Royal at the age of 11. Her parents had a busy household with 9 children, including a newborn baby and a large number of animals. Their immediate neighbors were the brother and the elderly parents of Catherine. Jacques' own parents were another door away.[2]

Around 1692, she married François Cormier, son of Thomas Cormier and Marie Madeleine Girouard.[1] They were listed in the 1693 census at Beaubassin with their 3 month old daughter Marie. [3] Within four years, the newlyweds would witness the effects of Church's 1696 raid of Beaubassin. Once the English ships were seen, the inhabitants fled, carrying their more valuable possessions. In Beaubassin, the church was burned along with some houses and animals were slaughtered. It is not known how the family was affected.

In 1704, the family witnessed the effects of Church's second raid on Beaubassin. There was a skirmish and inhabitants retreated to the woods, bringing as many valuable possessions as possible. Again, the church was burned and animals were slaughtered.

Between about 1693 and 1723, the couple had 14 children: Marguerite, Marie, Pierre (dit Rossignol), Anne, Catherine, Cécile, an unnamed girl, Paul, François, Joseph, Isabelle, Jean, Marie, and Marie-Josèphe.[1] Their growing family was counted in Beaubassin again in the censuses of 1698[4], 1700[5], 1701[6], 1703[7], 1707[8], and 1714.[9] The family's land holdings and possessions increased greatly through the years.

After the Treaty of Utrecht, when British rule became permanent, the Cormiers, like most of their neighbours decided to stay in Beaubassin as French neutrals (promising to stay true to the King of Great Britain and to remain neutral in the event of a conflict between France and Great Britain). Beaubassin then experienced decades of relative peace and prosperity. The village was productive in raising cattle, growing grain, and trading fur with the Mi’kmaq and Maliseet. Surpluses were traded with both the English (Bay of Fundy) and the French (Baie Vert).[10]

She died after 21 Nov 1740 in Acadia.[1]

Timeline

c1676 Birth, in Port-Royal
1687 War of the League of Augsburg (King William’s War) starts between England and France[11]
c1692 Marriage to François Cormier
c1693 birth, daughter Marguerite
c1694 birth, daughter Marie
c1695 birth, son Pierre (dit Rossignol)
1696 Benjamin Church raids Beaubassin. Once the English ships were seen, the inhabitants fled, carrying their more valuable possessions. Church “…stayed nine days and in his own account …admitted that the settlers’ ”cattle sheep, hogs, and dogs” were left ”lying dead about their houses, chopped and hacked with hatches". The church and some of the houses were also burnt. [11]
1697 Treaty of Ryswick restores Acadia to France; Port-Royal is its capital[12]
c1698 birth, daughter Anne
a1700 birth, daughter Catherine
a1703 birth, daughter Cécile
1702 War of the Spanish Succession (Queen Anne’s War) starts between England and France[12]
1704: Church raids Beaubassin again: “The Acadians were in arms and an indecisive skirmish ensued. After the Acadians retreated into the woods, Church and his men found that the inhabitants had removed as much of their household and farm goods as possible. Church set the buildings on fire [20]and killed about 100 cattle before leaving to return to Boston” [11]>
b1707 birth, daughter unknown name
'b1708 birth, son Paul
c1710 birth, son François
1710 Siege of Port-Royal; French surrender the Fort. Port-Royal, Acadia becomes Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia’’[12]
a1712 birth, son Joseph
’’1713: Treaty of Utrecht. France cedes Acadia to England. Permanent British rule’’[[13]
1715: Delegates from Beaubassin sign a conditional oath of allegiance, promising to stay true to the King of Great Britain for as long as they stayed in Nova Scotia, and to remain neutral in the event of a conflict between France and Great Britain
1713-1744: Golden Age[14] of Acadian Growth and Prosperity. Beaubassin is productive in raising cattle, growing grain, and trading fur with the Mi’kmaq and Maliseet. Surpluses are traded with both the English (Bay of Fundy) and the French (Baie Vert).[15]
b1715 birth, daughter Isabelle
1718 birth, son Jean
1722 birth, daughter Marie
c1723 birth, daughter Marie-Josèphe
1720 and onward: Acadians refuse to sign an unconditional oath of allegiance. This is tolerated by the British as they lack military means to enforce the oath.[16]
after 1740 death

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Stephen A. White, Patrice Gallant, Hector-J. Hébert, Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes (Moncton, N.-B.: Centre D'études Acadiennes, Université De Moncton, 1999) p.402-404; 985-987
  2. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1686 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie 1686 Census Transcribed. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 15-60.
    Jacques Leblanc, 35, Catherine Hébert, 23, Jean, 12, Marguerite, 11, Jacques, 9, Marie, 6 years old, Anne, 5 years old, Catherine, 3 years old, Pierre, 2 years old, René, 1 month old. 3 rifles, 6 arpans in plowing, 25 bestes with horns, 30 sheep, 15 pigs.
  3. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1693 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie 1693 Census Transcribed. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 62-108
    at Beaubassin: Francois CORMIER 21, Marguerite LEBLANC his wife 23, Marie 3 months; 6 cattle, 4 sheep, 10 arpents, 1 gun
  4. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1698 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie1698 Census Transcribed. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 110-150
    at Beaubassin: Francois CORMIER 26; Marguerite LEBLANC (wife) 22; Marguerite 5; Marie 4; Pierre 3; Anne 5 months; 10 cattle, 2 sheep, 4 hogs, 7 1/2 arpents, 1 gun.
  5. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1700 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie 1700 Census Transcribed. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 151-173.
    at Beaubassin: François CORMIER 28; Marguerite LEBLANC (wife) 24; Piere 5; Marguerite 7; Marie 6; Anne 3; 12 cattle, 8 sheep, 3 hogs, 15 arpents, 1 gun.
  6. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1701 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie 1701 Census Transcription. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 174-211.
    Francois CORMIER, his wife, 1 girl, 2 boys, 7 arpents, 13 cattle, 10 sheep, 5 hogs, 1 gun.
  7. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1703 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie 1703 Census Transcription. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 212-220.
    at Beaubassin: Franc. [Francois] CORMIER, his wife. 1 boy, 5 girls, 2 arms bearers
  8. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1707 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie 1707 Census Transcription. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 221-237.
    at Beaubassin: Francois CORMIER and Anne LEBLANC, 1 boy less than 14, 2 girls 12 or older, 4 younger girls; 8 arpents, 20 cattle, 20 sheep, 20 hogs.
  9. Tim Hebert; Transcription of the 1714 Acadian Census, at Port-Royal, Acadie 1714 Census Transcription. The original census can be found at Acadian Census microfilm C-2572 of the National Archives of Canada “Acadie Recensements 1671 – 1752”, Images 239-261.
    at Beaubassin: Francois CORMIER and Margueritte LeBLANC his spouse; children: Pierre, Anne, Catherine, Cecile, Paul, Francois, Joseph.
  10. Régis Brun, A.J.B. Johnston, and Ernest Clarke," Fort Beauséjour – Fort Cumberland: Une histoire / A History". Memramcook, N.B; Parks Canada and Société du Monument Lefebvre, 1991
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 Griffiths, Naomi E.S., From migrant to Acadian : a North-American border people, 1604-1755, Montreal (Québec), McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005, p147-151 (King William’s War); p 164 (1696 Church raid of Beaubassin); p 208 (1704 Church’s Raid on Beaubassin)
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 Dunn, Brenda. A History of Port Royal / Annapolis Royal 1605-1800. Nimbus Publishing, p 44-45; (1697 Treaty of Ryswick); p 52-53 (1702 Queen Anne’s War); p. 82-85 (1710 Siege of PR).
  13. http://www2.umoncton.ca/cfdocs/etudacad/1755/index.cfm?id=010201000&lang=en&style=G&admin=false&linking= The Neutrality: Political Context, in 1755 l'Histoire et les Histoires, University of Moncton]
  14. Griffiths, Naomie E.S. The Contexts of Acadian History 1686-1784.Published for the Center for Canadian Studies Mount Allison University, Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press, 1992, p61 (golden age);
  15. Brun, Régis with contributions by AJB Johnston and E Clarke, Fort Beauséjour/Fort Cumberland: Une Histoire/A History, Société du Monument Lefebvre in Collaboration with Parks Canada, Accessed November 2013 [Broken link]
  16. The Neutrality: Political Context, 1755 Histoire et Les Histoires, University of Moncton
  • Maternal relationship is confirmed by an FTDNA mtFull Sequence match at a Genetic Distance of 0 between Mariane St-Onge and an undisclosed maternal line cousin (SH). Their direct maternal line MRCA is Catherine Hébert.


More Genealogy Tools



Sponsored Search




Sponsored Search by Ancestry.com

DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Marguerite by comparing test results with other carriers of her mitochondrial DNA. Mitochondrial DNA test-takers in the direct maternal line: It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share some percentage (beta) of DNA with Marguerite:

Have you taken a DNA test? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.

Sponsored by Ancestry ®

Family History Search.

Simplified.

Enter a grandparent's name. Just one grandparent can lead you to many discoveries.

Comments: 2

Leave a message for others who see this profile.
There are no comments yet.
Login to post a comment.
LeBlanc-5309 and LeBlanc-25 appear to represent the same person because: Clear duplicate
posted by Jacqueline Girouard
Leblanc-5447 and LeBlanc-25 appear to represent the same person because: clear duplicate
posted by Jacqueline Girouard

L  >  LeBlanc  >  Marguerite LeBlanc

Categories: Beaubassin, Acadie | Port-Royal, Acadie | Acadians