Pierre Leduc
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Pierre Leduc (abt. 1670 - 1740)

Pierre Leduc
Born about in Rouen, Normandie, Francemap
Ancestors ancestors
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married 28 Jun 1700 in Lachine, Canada, Nouvelle-Francemap
Descendants descendants
Died in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Canada, Nouvelle Francemap
Profile last modified | Created 7 Aug 2011
This page has been accessed 3,818 times.

Contents

Biography

Flag of France
Pierre Leduc migrated from France to New France.
Flag of New France

Pierre Leduc was the son of Pierre Leduc and Anne Martin, of the city of Rouen, in Normandie, St-Laurent parish.[1]

Pierre Leduc was hospitalized in Hôtel-Dieu hospital of Québec on 16 October 1698, being given the age of 28 on the record, with origin of Rouen.[2]

He arrived in the colony as a soldier in a detachment of Marine troops, company of Mr de Lamothe, the first mention of him here being in 1691.[1] Jetté places his arrival date at 6 July 1691.[3]

Marriage

Pierre Leduc & Catherine Fortin, marriage

Ce jourdhuy vingthuitieme Juin mil sept cent a esté fait et solemnisé le mariage entre Pierre Leduc soldat de la compagnie de Monsieur de Lamotte, maistre chaudronier, fils de deffunct Pierre Leduc vivant maistre fourbisseur et de deffuncte Anne Martin sa femme demeurant en la ville de Rouan paroisse St Laurent, led. Pierre Leduc fils demeurant en cette parroisse d'une part. Et Catherine Fortin fille de deffunct Louis Fortin vivant laboureur et de Catherine Godin sa femme demeurant en cette parroisse d'autre part. Ce mariage a esté fait apres la publication des trois bans en vertu de la permission qu'en a obtenu le marié de Monsieur le chevallier de Calliere gouverneur general de la France septentrionalle le moy dernier et en la presence de Jean Neveu beau pere de la mariée, Catherine Godin sa femme, René Fortin, Jean Chotart, Marie Fortin, Vivien Magdelenne dit Ladouceur, Jean Baptiste Lesnard, et Estienne Magdalenne dit Ladouceur, Jacque Biguot, Guillaume Roussel, Nicolle Fillastrau, Marie Roy, Marie L'Homme, Catherine Secire, Marie Clemence Rapein, qui ont tous declaré ne savoir signer de ce enquis ste à l'ord Sr Pottier, signé[4][5]

On 28 June 1700 was done and solemnized the marriage between Pierre Leduc, soldier of the company of Mr Lamotte, master brazier, son of the late Pierre Leduc, master furbisher in life, and of the late Anne Martin his wife, of the city of Rouen, St-Laurent parish, now resident of this parish on the one part, and Catherine Fortin, daughter of the late Louis Fortin, ploughman in life, and of Catherine Godin his wife, residing in this parish on the other part. this marriage was done after the publication of the 3 bans in virtue of the permission obtained by the groom from Mr the knight de Callière governor general of northern France last month and in the presence of Jean Neveu step-father of the bride, Catherine Godin his wife, René Fortin, Jean Chotart, Marie Fortin, Vivien Magdelenne dit Ladouceur, Jean Baptiste Lesnard, and Estienne Magdalenne dit Ladouceur, Jacque Biguot, Guillaume Roussel, Nicolle Fillastrau, Marie Roy, Marie L'Homme, Catherine Secire, Marie Clemence Rapein, who all declared they could not sign when asked per the ordinance. Sr Pottier signed.

Place: Sts-Anges de Lachine, [6]

Known children The family appear to be established on Île Perrot, with baptisms being done in nearby Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue or Pointe-Claire, some records mention the place of residence but not all. Marriages sometimes mention it also.

  1. Marie Anne Leduc b & bapt 26 Jul 1702 Lachine; married with Claude Grenier 14 Jun 1730 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue; d 20 Apr 1794 buried 21 Île Perrot (Ste-Jeanne-de-Chantal) @ 92
  2. Pierre Leduc b 14 Sept 1704 bapt 15 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue; married at 25 with Pélagie Tougas (dite Laviolette) 12 Jun 1730 Montréal (ND)
  3. Jean Baptiste Leduc b 8 Sept 1710 bapt 14 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue; married with Françoise Deruisseaux 11 Feb 1740 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue
  4. Marie Marthe Leduc b 6 Nov 1713 bapt 7 Pointe-Claire (twin); d 20 Dec 1713 buried 21 Pointe-Claire
  5. Marie Barbe Leduc b 6 Nov 1713 bapt 7 Pointe-Claire (twin); d 20 Dec 1713 buried 21 Pointe-Claire
  6. René Leduc b 27 Feb 1715 bapt 28 Pointe-Claire; married with Marie Élisabeth Fortier 7 Jan 1739 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue
  7. Marie Françoise Leduc b 9 Jun 1717 Île Perrot bapt 11 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue; Françoise married with Charles Léger 7 Jan 1738 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue
  8. Pierre Leduc b 10 Aug 1719 bapt same day Pointe-Claire
  9. Charles Michel Leduc b 8 Apr 1722 Île Perrot bapt 11 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue; Michel married Marguerite Cuillierier 1 Jun 1744 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue
  10. Geneviève Leduc, b 25 Sept 1725 bapt 27 Pointe-Claire; married with Étienne Grenier 7 Jan 1744 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue
  11. Thomas Leduc b 2 Mar 1729 bapt 3 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue; married Catherine Réhaume (sic) 19 Oct 1750 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue
  12. Antoine Marie Leduc b 5 Jan 1732 Île Perrot bapt 6 Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue
  13. Jacques Leduc b?; married with Marie Anne Biset 21 Feb 1746 Oka[3][7]

On December 31, 1700, he received a concession of forty-one arpents of land in area on the coast of Lake St-Louis from the Montréal Sulpicians, seigneurs for the area.

Concession d’une terre de quarante et un arpents en superficie sur le bord du Lac St-Louis, par les Seigneurs de Montréal, à Pierre Le Duc, chaudronnier en l’île (31 décembre 1700). Notaire J.B. Pottier Vol XI pg 212[8]

The only other notarial act found which clearly relates to him (there is another Pierre Leduc in the colony at the same time) was an obligation by him to the Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue vestry, with others also, all parties making a donation to the church vestry.

Obligation par Pierre Leduc de l'ile Perrot, à la fabrique Ste-Anne représentée par Messire Jean Degay Desenclaves curé de la dite paroisse, pour la somme de 100 livres pour autant qui était due aux Srs Guillet et Cuillerier par Guillaume Lalonde, dont ils font don à la dite fabrique. (27 février 1731). Notaire Joseph Charles Raimbault, Vol XXI pg 108

Death & funeral

Pierre Leduc, born in Rouen, Normandie, son of Pierre Leduc and Marie Anne Martin, was buried on 29 Feb 1740 in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, the record giving him 73 years of age.[9] The record does not state where or when he died.

Research notes

Note: He was not soldier of Mr de Callière but of Mr de Lamotte, he obtained permission to marry from Mr de Callière, who as governor of the colony was the final authority for giving such permissions to soldiers, who if still in service had to obtain such before marrying.

Other data

Various notes were on this profile, many of them related to his son Thomas, and others to his arrival or his father. Many of these have no specific source cited, but are being left here for research purposes. Additional sources were graciously provided, Russell Larson, who compiled research on the Leduc / LaDuke family, and is used with his kind permission.

Addie Leduc Morton – Ancestry of William Leduc

Error in Leduc Family – in a record “Denissen Compilation.” Toussaint Leduc is listed as the son of his Uncle Stephen Leduc. Toussaint in the Denissen Compliation should be listed as son of Francis Barthelmy Leduc. Stephen Leduc had no sons named Toussaint but had a brother by the name of Toussaint and that brother had a son named Toussaint.

Error in Addie Leduc Mortan – Ancestry of William Leduc

In the Ancestry of Addie Leduc Morton – she notes that Thomas Leduc born March 2, 1729 in Ill Perrot and was married four times, but he was married only three times.

Addie lists a 2nd Wife Marguerite Giroux and a 3rd Wife of Charlotte St. Marcel.

But in fact, there was only one marriage, as Marguerite was born with the last name Giroux.

According to Tanguay and PRDH Marguerite’s father was Etienne Giroux dit St-Marcel.

St-Marcel is a dit name for Giroux.

She was married prior to Thomas and her father’s name was Etienne Giroux – St. Marcel.

Therefore, we can confirm and update Addie’s ancestry. This does not change anything for anyone’s heritage, but is another example of how documents and records can be inaccurate.

Original marriage contract of Thomas and Angelique Cuillerier

The marriage contract of Thomas and Angelique, proves the fact Thomas Leduc, born March 3, 1729, son of Pierre and Catherine Fortin, who married Catherine Reaume, was also the Thomas Leduc, who married Angelique Cuillerier,

June 10, 1772, at I’le Perrot.


The parish records of Rouen are very well preserved with only a few discrepancies between 1640 and 1792. However, the Chief Curator ... was not able to trace the baptismal document of the third Pierre after searching the parish records of Saint-Laurent between the years 1670-1680. This third Pierre, the pioneer, was a master-boilermaker: a craftsman who made and sold cauldrons, portable stoves and other kitchen ustensils.

As soldier in the Compagny of La Motte (sic) in 1691, accompanied by Sieur Villebon, Pierre spent some fifty days sailing across the Atlantic on the ship "Le Soleil d'Afrique". His regiment camped at Ile Perrot, July 6, 1691, and left the following day for Acadia (now Nova Scotia and a part of New Brunswick). Nine years later, after completing his military service, my ancestor embarked upon his third career: farmer. In a notary document before Mr. J.B. Pottier, December 31, 1700, we learn that he obtained from Sulpicians of Montreal "a concession of forty-one-and-a-half arpents, short of a few feet wide on the said island in Lake Saint-Louis, by two arpents and twenty-four feet wide" which is approximatly 12 hectares or 1,500,000 square feet on the island of Montreal somewhere between Lachine and Saint-Anne-de-Bellevue. Reading this four-page docment, of which I have copy, we learn amongst other things that Pierre was not able to sign his name, and that his neighbours were Pierre Saboutin and Yves Beix. -- The couple had 13 children, including 8 boys. Among these, Pierre Rene, Jean-Baptiste and Charles-Michel in 1765 were identified as having respective lands 60, 68, 245 and 260 acres in Ile Perrot.

Jean-Baptiste married the daughter of Joseph Trottier Desruisseaux who it is said that in 1703 bought the island of Paul Lemoyne. In 1740, Jean-Baptiste has owned the island for a period of two years, a gift from his wife's stepmother. Tanguay says the Lord of Ile Perrot.

The church St Laurent at Rouen, his home parish, now houses the museum Secq des Tournelles dedicated to metalwork. It dates from the middle of the XV century. The origin of this parish is very old. Letters of Richard II, Duke of Normandy, in the year 1024, speak of the church of St. Lawrence in the suburb of Rouen. In 1650 this parish had 2.500 souls. -- shari_handley originally shared this to Shari Handley's Family Tree

Pierre the father is recorded as being a Maître-fourbisseur. The best translation is Master Furbisher. The origin of the word furbisher holds many meanings. What can be translated is that Pierre worked with either making, selling or repairing swords. (Furbisher; maker or repairer of swords’.Forbarius 1221 Picardy,Le Fourbeur 1251, 1384, 14th C Picardy, 1421, 1438.)

Pierre Leduc Married Anne Martin Maitre furbisher baptized on June 24, 1645 with the parish St-Laurent, Rouen, France. He did not come to New-France. The origin of the word furbisher holds many meanings and is a very old word. What can be translated is that a maitre furbisher mounts and polished the bayonets. Or polishes swords and weapons. He works with metal.

As soldier in the Company of La Motte in 1691, accompanied by sieur Villebon, Pierre spent some fifty days sailing across the Atlantic on the ship "Le Soleil d'Afrique". His regiment camped at Ile Perrot July 6, 1691, and left the following day for Acadia (now Nova Scotia and a part of New Brunswick). Nine years later, after completing his military service, my ancestor embarked upon his third career: farmer. In a notary document before Mr. J.B. Poitier, December 31, 1700, we learn that he obtained from Sulpicians of Montreal "a concession of forty-one-and-a-half arpents, short of a few feet wide on the said island in Lake Saint-Louis, by two arpents and twenty-four feet wide" which is approximately 12 hectares or 1,500,000 square feet on the island of Montreal somewhere between Lachine and Saint-Anne-de-Bellevue.


Verification of Marriage date

Marriage of Pierre Leduc and Catherine Fortin 28 June 1700

The original copy of the marriage certificate matches a journal account recorded by Vivien Lamagadeleine Ladouceur

The record of this marriage is very clear, it was also documented and recorded by Vivien Lamagdeleine dit Ladouceur (1638-1708) in a document called: Chronique de Vivien Lamagdeleine dit Ladouceur: http://genealogie.over-blog.net/article-599336.html

Catherine married in Lachine, June 28, 1700, to Pierre Leduc, son of Pierre Leduc, Maître-fourbisseur and of Anne Martin, both St-Laurent parish of Rouen, in Normandy.

ORIGINAL FRENCH NOTATION

From the Parish Register: Les St-Anges-Gardiens-de-Lachine, Montreal, P.Q. 1676-1756

Aujourd'huy vingt huitieme Juin mil sept cent a esté faites solemnisé le mariage entre Pierre Leduc soldat de la compagnie de Monsieur de Lamotte, maistre chaudronier, fils de deffunct

Pierre Leduc vivant maistre fourbisseur et de defuncte Anne Martin sa femme demeurant en la Ville de Rouan paroisse St Laurent, d'une part.

ENGLISH TRANSLATION From the Parish Register: Les St-Anges-Gardiens-de-Lachine, Montreal, P.Q. 1676-1756

Today twenty-eighth of June one thousand seven hundred solemnized (formalized) the marriage between Pierre Leduc soldier of the company of Monsieur de Lamotte, maistre chaudronier, son of the late (deceased) Pierre Leduc, a Maître-fourbisseur and late (deceased) Anne Martin his wife, where they resided in the City of Rouen Parish St Laurent, Normandy, France.

Pierre Leduc came to Canada in 1691 aboard "Le Soleil d'Afrique" ("The Sun of Africa"), a naval frigate of the French army. It departed from La Rochelle on April 27, 1688 with 50 soldiers and 25 recruits. Pierre Leduc was one of these. I've read that he was a chaudronnier - a cauldron maker, metal worker with the French army. We know that he was born in the little parish of St. Laurent, just outside Rouen, Haute-Normandie in 1645, to Pierre LeDuc Sr. and Anne Martin. In 1688 when Le Soleil d'Afrique set sail, he would have been 43. They reached Quebec on June 3, 1688. The commanding officer was one Denonville. Bonaventure fits in there somewhere. He was another senior officer or the captain. I have also read somewhere that these soldiers were in La Compagnie de Lamothe... I had read elsewhere that Pierre arrived in 1691, and that Le Soleil d'Afrique first stopped at Louisbourg... Pierre Leduc married Catherine Fortin, daughter of Louis Fortin from Evreux (also in Haute Normandie), and they settled on a small farm on Ile-Perot (near Montreal). The freeway there apparently runs through where there farm used to be.


The Soleil d’Afrique
Much information is provided on this ship and the acutal arrival date of Pierre to Canada. Documents and research show that Pierre Leduc, our ancestor, arrived in the first week of July of 1691. Although the ship arrived 01 July 1691, Pierre and others are recorded as departing the ship on 06 July 1691. For ease of use, I use the first week of July in 1691 as his arrival date.

The Soleil d’Afrique was first launched in 1681 and commissioned to bring furs back to France, which had been captured during the various raids. It would often be anchored off Charlton Island in the south East of James Bay. The ship would Load up with furs from Rupert House and Moose Factory then made its way back to France making a few stops on the way, sometimes in Albany. It also transported troops, and supplies.

The following is a report of a regular supply run of this ship in 1688, all other trips will be similar, unless a major encounter upon the sea. However, the 1691 trip was uneventful.

A last quota of 300 soldiers and recruits, recruited in the neighborhoods of Bayonne and Rochefort as in previous years, embarked on two vessels of the king: the frigate " Le Soleil d'Afrique " and the flute " La Maréchal". " the Le Soleil D'Afrique" leaves La Rochelle, April 27, 1688 with 50 men and 25 recruits to reach Quebec on June 3. A crossing without unhappy incidents “La Maréchale", leaves 16 or April 17 had to make stopover in Port-Louis, on the coasts of Brittany, April 29 with its 100 soldiers and 125 recruits.

The Soleil d'Afrique a naval French cruiser was placed under the command of Simon-Pierre Denys de Bonaventure in early 1691.

On the 1st of July 1691, the frigate arrived at Quebec. She had cleared the entrance of the river of the privateers which had been cruising in search of prizes, and twelve days afterwards the fleet of du Task, consisting of sixteen vessels, reached Quebec. The Soleil d’Africa stayed in port, until Frontenac was satisfied she was no longer needed for the protection of Quebec.

Transatlantic Voyages, 1600-1699 By David Dobson, p. 98

Soleil d’ Afrique - Master Simon Pierre Denys de Bonaventure, from La Rochell bound for Quebec and Acadia in 1691.

A vessel used to transport people, furs and supplies back and forth between France and Canada.

"On July 1, 1691, a fleet of 14 ships protected by the king's frigate, Le Soleil d'Afrique, the Sun Africa; with the food and ammunition that the whole colony had such a desperate need. Convoys train immediately to refuel all positions of New France, one goes to Montreal ... Fort Chambly also receives its share ... "-

Léo-Paul Desrosiers - Iroquoisie, Volume 4, p.100

The best sailboat in Europe in Quebec

Le meilleur voilier d'Europe à Québec

Cours d'histoire, Ferland, vol. 11, page 241 in Bulletin des Recherches Historiques, vol. 46

"CHARLEVOIX reports that the African Sun was made available to ROBINEAU de Villebon for an expedition to Acadia". Ordered by DENIS de Bonaventure, in charge of Villebon, the ship left France in June 1691 and arrived in Quebec in the early days of July. "CHARLEVOIX said that the African Sun was considered to be the best sailboat in Europe and was seven leagues an hour."

The History of Canada: Canada under French rule By William Kingsford

On the 1st of July, 1691, the frigate "le Soleil d'Afrique" arrived. She had cleared the entrance of the river of the privateers which had been cruising in search of prizes, and twelve days afterwards the fleet of du Tast, consisting of sixteen vessels arrived…

French Warships in the Age of Sail 1626–1786 P. 436

[ASC#164} The Ship: Soleil d'Afrique 28 guns, design by Pierre Malet, launched 1681 at Rochefort –

Spelling: Soleil d’Afrique however some poor spellings are (Soleil d'Africa)

The Crisis of French Sea Power, 1688–1697 By Geoffrey Symcox https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789024716456

Symcox G. (1974) Pontchartrain’s First Years 1691–1693. In: The Crisis of French Sea Power, 1688–1697. Archives Internationales D’histoire Des Idées / International Archives of the History of Ideas, vol 73. Springer, Dordrecht

ANCESTRAL OCCUPATION METAL WORKER: maistre chaudronier

Althought the current translation of this is boilermaker, one needs to know that names of occupations have changed over the years.

Pierre's father worked with metal, we can assume that Pierre aprenticed with his father .

Those basic skills of working with metal would be highly prized in colonial times, as importing tin, copper and other light metals utensils would have been expensive and early forts required a ligth metal worker to make less expensive household items for trade and sale.

Chaudronnier

coppersmith, ironsmith, brazier, pot maker, cauldron maker – tin-smith

An artisan who works with metals (copper but also iron, steel, aluminum) for the manufacture of various objects and appliances

(kitchen utensils, steam boilers, distillation apparatus, formerly musical instruments in copper, sometimes copper art objects), sells, repairs some of these objects.


Maître: master (craftsman)

Coppersmith: Boilermaker who buys old brass and sells them

see Vidal de La Blache , Table de la Geogr.of France, 1908, 326.

A Auvergnat ( Chênedollé , Journal, 1812 , page 70). - P. metaph., Iron.

Journal of the Vermont French-Canadian Genealogical Society, Vol. 8, No. 1 (Fall 2003)

Ancestral Occupations in Jetté and PRDH

by Mike Sevigny #59


Dictionary Illustrated. Names and places of Quebec, (1994), p. 630.

N 13 B 16-04-1684 Lachine m 28-06-1700 Lachine

Son of Pierre Leduc (Pierre & Anne Martin) of St-Laurent of Rouen, Normandy, France; arrived 06-07-1691

Quebec, soldier of the company of Lamothe; city 16-10-1698 Quebec Hospital, 28 years; Master ironmonger

Hotel-Dieu


Simon, James. "Soldiers on the Sick Registry of the Hôtel-Dieu de Qu;ebec 1689-1698: Part 2." Michigan's Habitant Heritage 30, no. 2 (April 2009): 81-90.


Maître Fourbisseur (d’épée)

Furbisher; maker or repairer of swords.

Becoming a master implies at least three years of companionship for the apprentice and the minimum age of 20 years, registration with the local government to present the masterpiece that represents the great affair of the companion's life. They have the right to furbish, to assemble, to garnish, and to sell swords, spears, daggers, halberds, spears, masses, slingers, axes, and weapons which have been invented anew, and of which uses in place of the old ones.


The Furnishers of Paris do not forge the blades they mount; they import them from Germany, Franche-Comte, and S. Etienne en Forez; the latter only serve for the troops; those of Germany are the finest and the most esteemed, those of Franche-Comte hold the middle.


A young compatriot, Husson Le Maistre, boilermaker in the village of Varville

( A. France , Life of Joan of Arc, 1908 , p.523).


Ville de la Rochelle. Se. E. Supplément; Archives communales by Charente-Maritime, France (Dept.) Archives départementales; Meschinet de Richemond, Louis Marie, 1839-


Soldat: soldier

Recruits had to be 20-30 years old, 158 cm tall, and fit for service. Single men were preferred. Most of the recruits were volunteers. From 1686, each newly raised company also included a veteran core of 14 non-commissioned officers and men from the Marine guards in French ports. The vast majority of soldiers did not live in barracks. The town of Montreal only built a barrack in 1685, which only sheltered 100 of the 250 soldiers stationed there at the time. Most soldiers lived with colonists. To prevent conflict between colonists and soldiers, the Intendant, Jacque de Meulles passed legislation that stated, " an ordinance which obliged the habitats to provide no more than one pot, one chaudière, and a place for the soldier to sleep. This was later altered to include a straw bed, and place by the fire during the winter months




Will take command of the vessel “Le Soleil d'Afrique,” and “Le Hazardeux,” fitting out at Rochefort to carry munitions to Quebec and to escort merchant ships.

http://www.naviresnouvellefrance.net/html/pages16911692.html


Public Archives of Canada

Documents Relating to the Constitutional History of Canada. 1759-1791, 1791-1818

By Public Archives of Canada, Douglas Brymner, Sir Arthur George Doughty, Edouard Richard; Report By Public Archives of Canada P. 290 P. 294

America's Military Adversaries: From Colonial Times to the Present By John C. Fredriksen

The Forgotten Battle: A History of the Acadians of Canso/Chedabuctou By Mark Haynes

The Rise and Fall of the American Empire: A Re-Interpretation of History, Economics and Philosophy: 1492-2006 Paperback – April 1, 2007 by Rocky M. Mirza (Author)


Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 Fichier origine: Pierre Leduc, 242406, last revised 2013
  2. Registre Hôtel-Dieu de Québec pg 412 1698-10-16 — Leduc, Pierre (28 ans), Rouen.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Dictionnaire généalogique des familles du Québec - René Jetté pg 684 Note: Jetté stops his work in 1730 so the last child he recorded was Thomas
  4. Image Parish Register: Les Sts-Anges-Gardiens-de-Lachine, 1676-1756
  5. Transcription revised by Liard-1 11 Mar 2019
  6. Marriage - FamilySearch
  7. Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1997 - Drouin IGD
  8. BanQ Notarial acts index
  9. Sépulture-Funeral image IGD


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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Pierre by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share some percentage (beta) of DNA with Pierre:

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Comments: 4

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Leduc-925 and Leduc-60 appear to represent the same person because: Same wife
posted by Julie Marcoux
there you go, cleaned it up and added sources etc, leaving some of the pre-existing notes in for anyone's further research, although they have no sources.
posted by Danielle Liard
if you need help sorting out his bio and correct data, let me know, happy to assist. Just remember to include profile link so I know which one you're talking about.  :D
posted by Danielle Liard
Leduc-243 and Leduc-60 appear to represent the same person because: Same wife, please see PRDH data on Leduc-60
posted by Louise St-Amour

Rejected matches › Pierre (LeDuc) Leduc (1704-1792)