no image

William James Lewin (1731 - abt. 1816)

Privacy Level: Open (White)
William James (William) Lewin aka Lawing
Born in Steeple Aston, Oxfordshire, England, United Kingdommap
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married about in Mecklenburg County, North Carolinamap
Descendants descendants
Died about in Warren County, Tennessee, United Statesmap
Profile last modified | Created 20 Jun 2014 | Last significant change: 19 Jun 2019
17:30: Pat Kilgore edited the data for William James Lewin (1731-abt.1816). (Christened at Steeple Aston Oxford on January 7, 1732) [Thank Pat for this]
This page has been accessed 115 times.

Biography

US Southern Colonies.
William Lewin settled in the Southern Colonies in North America prior to incorporation into the USA.
Join: US Southern Colonies Project
Discuss: southern_colonies
England flag
William Lewin was born in , England.

William James Lawing/Lewin born July 3,1732 London England. He was the son of William Lewin, a Carpenter, and Elizabeth Lewin.

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London’s Central Criminal Court 1674 to 1913: The proceedings of the King’s commissions of the Peace, and Oyer and Terminer, held for the City of London and County of Middlesex at Justice Hall in the Old Baily, the Honorable William Been, Esq: Lord Mayor of the City of London:

Actions – July 1746, trial of James Lewin: James Lewin was indicted for stealing a Gold Watch value of Seventeen Guineas, in the Minories, the goods of Thomas Gardner, the 27th of May. (Entire proceedings at end of chapter.) James acknowledged that he did steal the watch at the Paul’s Head Tavern facing St. Lawrence’s Church. James’ father William Lewin, a Carpenter testified that James was 14 years old at St Thomas Day, (July 3) and that had never been in trouble before. James’ mother, Elizabeth Lewin testified that he worked with the Carman (drivers of the horse drawn carriages) he would drive their horses, and give them hay, etc. When Mr. Gardner was asked to produce the watch he said that he had lost the watch. James was Acquitted.[1]

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey, London’s Central Criminal Court 1674 to 1913: William Lewin in trial of shoplifting 5 Dec 1746: William Lewin was indicted for stealing one Silver Watch value 42 s. out of the shop of John Neal, in Leaden Hall Street. The Constable caught him, turned his back and William jumped out of the window. The Lord-Mayor remembered him as soon as he saw him, he was the same boy that was before him for the theft of Mr. Gardner’s Gold Watch and was tried the Sessions before last. (using the name James). William’s parents did not come to court for him this time. (probably the reason he said that he was an orphan) William offered to be a Witness against many of his accomplices, but the Lord-Mayor said it would be better for him to be sent abroad. Verdict Guilty – sentence Transportation (14 years old was the youngest age to be transported).[2]

An accomplice, Mary Clement, was acquitted of receiving stolen goods.[3]

William Lewin along with 61 other felons were transported on the George William l under the command of Capt. James Dobbins. They departed London in Jan 1747 and arrived in Virginia in 1747.

How did this 14 year old child survive the horrendous voyage on a convict ship and exactly what happened to him when he arrived in this new world? He must have felt abandoned and all alone. One thing is for sure, he grew into a strong man and lived to be nearly 90 years old, surviving the French and Indian War.

From Mike xxxxxx (e-Mail: xxx) Family History Forum Feb. 13, 2000: "About 1808, William, his wife, his son Samuel, his two daughters Ann and Sallie, and their husbands moved to Warren Co., TN. William made a deed in 1812 making his son Samuel his heir. The deed was witnessed by his two sons-in-law. William died about 1818 in TN. George Lawing is listed as Bondsman for 'Jain' Lawing and husband Solomon Stansbury, in Lincoln Co., NC, 1791. He later shows up in 1808 as owning land in Lauren Co., SC with wife Elizabeth. (This) George is most likely a son of William Lawing, and a brother to Andrew Lawing, William Lawing, Jr. and Samuel Lawing."

From the records of Donna xxx xxxxxxx: In 1768, Stephen Hyp [Hipp] served as second chain-bearer when Gideon Thompson received a grant of land in the Catawba River watershed. William Lawing was first chain-bearer.

From: Holcombe and Parker, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, Deed Abstracts, 1763-1779 (Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1979, 1991):

p. 108: Vol. 4, p. 314: 8 Apr. 1765, Jasper Hover & wf Margaret of Meck., to John Farmer of same for L10 Proc. money... land on E side Cataba River opposite William Haberts, 89 A... Gesper Hover (Seal), Margaret Hover (V) (Seal). Wit: Joseph Moore, William Lewing, William Dunpal. Prov. July term 1767.

p. 153: Vol. 5, pp. 127-128: 22 Aug 1768, Wm Lawing of Meck..., to Samuel Ziklagg of Meck., for L25 pric. money... 125 A on East bank of Catawba River adj. Thos. Thomsons, granted to W, Lawing 16 Nov 1761... William Lawing (Seal), Jane Lawing (X) (Seal), Wit: John Moore, Matthew Run (M). Rec. Jan term 1770.

From Ferguson, Herman W., Mecklenburg County, NC, Minutes of the Court of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1780-1800, (privately published, 1995):

p. 25: 1794 January Session: Deed from William Lawing to Justice Beach for 145 acres dated July 8, 1783, proved by John McKnitt Alexander.

p. 105: 1791 July Session: William Lawing (along with his son Andrew Lawing) was a roadhand for the road from Charlottetown to Thompsons ford.

p. 141: 1794 January Session: William Lawing proved a deed of gift from Matthew Robinson to George Robinson for 50 acres, dated January 25, 1794.

p. 188: 1797 October Session (Wednesday, 25th): William Lawing was ordered a roadhand under overseer Hugh Stevenson.

p. 198: 1798 July Session: On motion of Samuel Lawrie, Esquire, ordered by the court that William lawing obtain a duplicate warrant for an entry of land bearing date the 26th of October 1786 and number 1226 agreeable to law.

p. 202: 1798 October Session: State of North Carolina, Mecklenburg County; This day William Lawing of said county came before we (who being duly sworn) deposeth and saith that John Richards (his stepson) who lived with him from near his infancy to manhood, that he therefore was and is well acquainted with the hand writing of his late neighbor, Daniel Sanders, and therefore from the knowledge which he hath he does now believe that an assignment of a bond from Willim Falkner to Robert Abernathy, dated March 9th, 1779 is evidenced by the said Daniel Sanders, and said John Roberts. Which bond appears from the face thereof to be a bond of performance for two tracts of land from John Farmer to said William Falkner dated October 2d, 1769. This deponent further saith that about 18 years ago the said Robert Abernathy did settle on of his sons on one of the tracts of land mentioned in said bond, and that said tract is now and has ever since been in the peaceable possession of said Robert Abernathy's son under occupancy to his won knowledge as said tract is but one mile from this deponent's house wherein he has lived 20 years. Sworn to & subscribed the 9th of October 1789. Signed William Lawing before William B. Alexander, JP.

p. 206: 1799 January Session: Deed from William Lawing to John Sumter for 100 acres, dated November 23, 1798, proved by James Neal.

From Ferguson, Herman W., Mecklenburg County, NC, Minutes of the Court of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1800-1820 (privately published, 1997):

p. 111: 1808 October Session: William Lawing to Andrew Lawing, for 151 acres of land bearing the date the 25th of July 1807, (proved) by Thos. McLure [was William settling his estate before moving to Tennessee?]

From Pruitt, Dr. A. B., Abstract of Land Entries: Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, 1778-1795 (privately published, 1988):

p. 93: 1126 October 26, 1786, Wm Lawing enters 100 acres in Mecklenburg County on waters of Long Creek, Cataba River, bordered by James Tomm, Jno. Anderson's old line & Stephen Hipp.

From Kemp, Lee, The Long Creek Settlement and the Gum Branch East of the Catawba River, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina: A Genealogical Survey of the Neighbors and Allied Families of William and Nancy Ramsey, http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncmeckle/longcrk.htm, accessed September 30, 2016)

William LAWING was a witness on a 1788 land deed executed from James and Sarah THOMPSON to John JOHNSTON. In a 1763 land grant William LAWING was a chain bearer for John MOORE for the surveying of land on Long Creek east side of Catawba River, and in 1768, he was a chain bearer, along with Stephen HYP/HIPP, for Gideon THOMPSON for land on Catawba River. On 22 Aug 1768, William LAWING conveyed to Samuel ZIKLAGG 125 acres on the East Bank of the Catawba River, adjacent to Thomas THOMASON; and being that land which was granted to William LAWING 16 Nov 1761. Johnston family records state that William LAWING was the grandfather of John Killian LAWING, husband to Agnes/Nancy JOHNSTON, daughter of John JOHNSTON.

William Lawing - Head of household, 1790 U.S. Census.[4]

Sources

  1. Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 13 April 2019), July 1746, trial of James Lewin (t17460702-3).
  2. Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 13 April 2019), December 1746, trial of (t17461205-4).
  3. Old Bailey Proceedings Online (www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 13 April 2019), January 1747, trial of Mary Clement (t17470116-22).
  4. "United States Census, 1790," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9YY8-SKR5?cc=1803959&wc=3XTM-BDK%3A1584071002%2C1584071033%2C1584070607 : 14 May 2015), North Carolina > Mecklenburg > Not Stated > image 6 of 19; citing NARA microfilm publication M637, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Holcombe and Parker, "Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, Deed Abstracts, 1763-1779," Southern Historical Press, Greenville, SC, 1979, 1991
  • Ferguson, Hermon W., Mecklenburg County, NC, Minutes of the Court of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1780-1800, privately published, 1995.
  • Ferguson, Hermon W., Mecklenburg County, NC, Minutes of the Court of Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions, 1800-1820, privately published, 1997.
  • Pruitt, Dr. A. B., Abstract of Land Entries: Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, 1778-1795, privately published, 1988.
  • Kemp, Lee, The Long Creek Settlement and the Gum Branch East of the Catawba River, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina: A Genealogical Survey of the Neighbors and Allied Families of William and Nancy Ramsey, (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncmeckle/longcrk.htm, accessed September 30, 2016.
  • The Long Creek Settlement and the Gum Branch East of the Catawba River, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina: A Genealogical Survey of the Neighbors and Allied Families of William and Nancy Ramsey, By Lee Kemp (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncmeckle/longcrk.htm, accessed September 30, 2016)

Acknowledgements

Help with finding the source of William’s French & Indian War service came from Kathryn Parks Kathryn Parks and Eddie King. Pat Kilgore found the Old Baliey records that prove William's parents and that he was transported to Virginia for the crime of stealing a watch.



More Genealogy Tools



Sponsored Search




Sponsored Search by Ancestry.com

DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with William by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with William:

Have you taken a DNA test for genealogy? If so, login to add it. If not, see our friends at Ancestry DNA.



Collaboration

  • Login to edit this profile.
  • Private Messages: Contact the Profile Managers privately: Pip Sheppard, Rick Lane, and Chris Ball. (Best when privacy is an issue.)
  • Public Comments: Login to post. (Best for messages specifically directed to those editing this profile. Limit 20 per day.)
  • Public Q&A: These will appear above and in the Genealogist-to-Genealogist (G2G) Forum. (Best for anything directed to the wider genealogy community.)

On 13 Mar 2019 at 17:46 GMT Pat Kilgore wrote:

In 1988 I received a letter from Priscilla xxx of Jasper Ga, who was working on the Price/Lawing family. She sent me a typed sheet headed ‘Price Family History’. Quote from the sheet. (There’s a “rumor” that Callie Lawing’s Dad was really a MacIntosh. It is “suspicioned” that he stole $200,000.00 worth of gold coins from the Indians, and fled to this part of the country and changed his name to Lawing. It is thought that he buried the coins somewhere in N Car. I don’t know how much, if any of this is true, but, nevertheless, it is very interesting.) If this is true, this might explain why you can’t trace the Lawing family any further back than Callie’s dad, Ambrose.” End of story. Another story of a Lawing steeling gold. Possibly these rumors were not Ambrose, but maybe 3 gen back?

On 20 Jul 2018 at 11:30 GMT Pat Kilgore wrote:

Story handed down my family is that William was helping his grandson working in the fields shocking grain and returning home after dark as he was crossing the Stone River on a foot log he fell in and drowned. He was 100 years old. Has anyone heard that story?

On 7 Jun 2018 at 16:27 GMT Pip Sheppard wrote:

Lawing-75 and Lawing-25 appear to represent the same person because: William is the same on three profiles. Trying to fix (my mistake in creating profile before checking to see if there were others). See bio and sources on mine (75).

On 7 Jun 2018 at 16:24 GMT Pip Sheppard wrote:

Lawing-54 and Lawing-25 appear to represent the same person because: Spouse is the same, though the dates of birth and death are different. I'll need to do another merge for my William Lawing if this merge is approved. Thanks!



Sponsored Search by Ancestry.com


Rejected matches › William Loving (abt.1765-)

William is 16 degrees from Deb Durham, 17 degrees from Lou Gehrig and 15 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.