Edward Livingston

Edward Livingston (1764 - 1836)

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Edward Livingston
Born in Clermont, Columbia County, New Yorkmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married 10 Apr 1788 (to 13 Mar 1801) [location unknown]
Husband of — married 3 Jun 1805 in New Orleansmap
Died in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, New York, USAmap
Profile manager: Jayme Hart private message [send private message]
Profile last modified 4 May 2019 | Created 20 Jul 2014
This page has been accessed 722 times.
Edward Livingston served for Louisiana in the War of 1812
Service started:
Unit(s):
Service ended:
Preceded by
10th Secretary
Martin Van Buren




Preceded by
Charles Dominique
Joseph Bouligny
Edward Livingston
11th United States
Secretary of State
State Dept
1831—1833

US Senator (Class 2)
from Louisiana
[1]
Seal of the US Senate
1829—1831
Succeeded by
12th Secretary
Louis McLane




Succeeded by
George A. Waggaman

Biography

Edward Livingston is Notable.

Edward was born in 1764. He was the son of Robert Livingston and Margaret Beekman. He passed away in 1836. [2]

Edward Livingston, 1764–1836, b. Livingston Manor, was the son of Robert R. Livingston (1718–75) and brother of Robert R. Livingston (1746–1813). He also established a reputation as a jurist and political figure. As a member (1795–1801) of the U.S. House of Representatives he opposed Jay's Treaty and the Alien and Sedition Acts. President Jefferson appointed him U.S. attorney for New York in 1801, the same year he became mayor of New York City. Because one of his clerks lost or misappropriated public funds, Livingston was forced to resign and to sell his property to pay off the debt. He then went to New Orleans. In the War of 1812 he became chairman of the committee on public defense and acted as aide-de-camp to Gen. Andrew Jackson. He was elected (1820) to the Louisiana legislature, and in 1821 was appointed to prepare a new code of laws and criminal procedure. Although the code was not adopted, its completeness and reasoned unity brought him international fame. He served again (1823–29) in the U.S. House of Representatives and then in the Senate (1829–31) before resigning to become Secretary of State under Andrew Jackson—for whom he wrote many important state papers, including the famous reply to the doctrine of nullification. As minister to France (1833–35), Livingston was unable to secure payment of American claims for spoliations resulting from the Napoleonic Wars.[3]

Legacy

  • Four U.S. states have named counties in his memory. They are: Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, and Missouri.

Sources

  1. Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of State, vacant May 24, 1831 – November 15, 1831 when successor elected.
  2. Edward Livingston on Wikipedia
  3. http://www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/people/livingston-edward-livingston-1764-1836.html

See also:

"The Livingstons of Livingston manor, being the history of that branch of the Scottish house of Callendar which settled in the English province of New York during the reign of Charles the Second; and also including an account of Robert Livingston of Albany, "The nephew," a settler in the same province and his principal descendants Copyright, 1910 BY EDWIN BROCKHOLST LIVINGSTON



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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Edward by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree: It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Edward:

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On 8 Apr 2015 at 23:51 GMT Cathryn (Hallett) Hondros wrote:

This is a link to a portrait of Edward Livingston.

https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/38.41

Edward is 17 degrees from Carroll Shelby, 26 degrees from Joan Whitaker and 11 degrees from Henry VIII of England on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.