Elmer Bruce Lloyd

Elmer Bruce Lloyd (1887 - 1948)

Privacy Level: Public (Green)
Elmer Bruce (Elmer Bruce) [uncertain] "Lloyd" Lloyd
Born in Michigan, USAmap
Ancestors ancestors
Husband of — married in Pensacola, Escambia, Florida, USAmap
Descendants descendants
Died in Pensacola, Escambia, Florida, USAmap
Lloyd-1433 created 29 May 2013 | Last modified
This page has been accessed 882 times.

Categories: Lloyd Name Study | Lloyd-1428 | Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola, Florida.


Elmer Bruce Lloyd is a Military Veteran.
Served in the United States Navy from 1918 to 1947 attaining Aviation Chief Machinists Mate, Chief Petty Officer.
Stationed at Pensacola Naval Air Station. Served on the battleship USS Idaho and on the aircraft carriers USS Ranger and USS Lexington. On the latter, he was initiated into the Ancient Order of the Deep.
Elmer Bruce was a Freemason. He had a tattoo of the emblem on his arm.

Contents

NOTE

An early draft of this biography was first published by me on Familypedia. It has been updated here to include new and more accurate information, since obtained. Lloyd-391 00:23, 17 May 2014 (EDT)

Biography

Elmer Bruce Lloyd was born 2 May 1886 in Michigan. (Most likely, Sault Sainte Marie, Chippewa, Michigan. Lloyd-391 00:23, 17 May 2014 (EDT)) He was the forth child and second son of Samuel Hughes Lloyd and Jane Ellen Higgins. He died 19 January 1948.

His son Winston wrote about his early education[1]: "I thought he had finished the eighth grade but Bruce says Father told him it was the third grade and I believe him. (Per the 1940 US Census, Elmer B. Lloyd had completed 8th grade. Lloyd-391 15:56, 19 May 2014 (EDT)) The story goes that since he [Elmer] was the strongest boy in the class the teacher kept him busy with chores: i.e keeping the school heated. In Upper Michigan with a wood burning stove this would be a real work assignment. This was the late eighteen hundreds and winter in Michigan involved wood fired stoves, floors were meant to be swept and snow was designed to be shoveled and of course at that time children didn't usually get a lot of schooling. Since he wasn't learning he didn't like school and dropped out."

He began work early in life: "He told Bruce of working with his father as a lumberjack when he was young. He was young and eager and was busting his butt to make as much money as possible. His father was less motivated and did not work as hard and when Father realized this he was upset because they shared the money equally. That didn't help his relationship with his father any for after all being a leader of men does not make one a leader of his father.... Later he was the foreman of a dynamite crew, a position that he earned by fighting the current foreman for the position. The team was dredging for the locks that were being built in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario on the St Mary's River which drains Lake Superior into Lake Huron and he was making more money than his father. He left home because of the friction that his higher pay grade caused. I believe he was 15 at that time. He was too young to be a dynamite foreman so he and one of his crew traded paychecks."[1]

Elmer Bruce Lloyd registered for the draft 5 June 1917 in Chippewa, Michigan. According to the draft card he was stout (by which they could only have meant that he was muscular, since none of the pictures of him suggest a portly figure), tall, and had brown hair and gray eyes.[2] He enlisted in the Navy 18 January 1918, where he was quickly promoted to Naval Chief.[1] As an airplane mechanic, his full title was Aviation Chief Machinists Mate (ACMM). In this photograph of him with his wife, Sissy, the insignia on his sleeve indicates that he was a Chief Petty Officer. (If I understand this correctly. See E-7 at Navy Ranks, Insignia and Descriptions. Lloyd-391 19:39, 2 May 2017 (EDT)) The specialty mark, located between the rocker and the first chevron, is that for an Aviation Maintenance Technician. (See 4102 - Sleeve Designs for Line and Staff Corps.)

Elmer Bruce Lloyd, standing, and Sissy, at wheel of car

Elmer Bruce Lloyd married Inez "Sissy" Minerva Herrington 7 July 1922 in Pensacola, Florida[3] They had three children: Joycelin, Bruce, and Winston. To the best of my memory, Sissy always referred to him as Lloyd[4].

Elmer Bruce Lloyd and His Children

Elmer Bruce Lloyd liked to make things. Some of the objects still in the family include wooden rattles with sliding parts, which had been carved from a single piece of wood[5]; miniature brass tools[6]; table lamps made from shell casings[7]; and a floor lamp made from an airplane propeller[8].

His son, Winston, wrote about him: "He was quite intelligent, quite strong and knew how to use his strength and he knew how to use his intelligence to multiply his strength (he knew where to put the fulcrum when he moved the earth). He knew how almost anything worked as well as how it had been made. The best part was that he could and did explain these things to us kids. He read widely and would certainly be considered self educated today. I am not sure that he ever appreciated just how intelligent he really was. He was a natural leader and he knew how to get others to follow him."[1]

In 1937 Elmer Bruce Lloyd fell from a catwalk (probably on the USS Ranger), when he tripped on a rope. His fall took him into a moving propeller blade which mangled his right arm and shoulder. He was in a military hospital for approximately a year after that, during which time he taught himself to write with his left hand.

Elmer Bruce Lloyd retired 15 March 1947, reluctantly, due to his health.[9][1] During his tenure he served in both World War I and World War II.[10] Ships on which he is known to have service include the battleship USS Idaho and the aircraft carriers USS Ranger and USS Lexington. He was, for a number of years, a member of Squadron VN3D8. At one point in his career, according to Winston, who has not only recorded this in his autobiography, but shared it verbally with friends and family members on many occasions, the members of the squadron who served with him held a vote to determine whether his nickname would be “Big Bad Wolf” or “The Bull of the Woods.” The second term was chosen, and his friends and shipmates usually just called him Bull.

Elmer Bruce Lloyd died of a heart attack, possibly brought on by complications from his injury, 19 January 1948.[11][12] The story told in the family is that he was holding his baby granddaughter, Lynn, when he realized he was having a heart attack. Through sheer strength of will, he carried her to her crib, nearby, and placed her in it, before he fell.[13] Lloyd was buried in Barrancas National Cemetery where, many years later, Sissy joined him.[14][15]

When I visited my grandparents' graves on 9 January 2014 with my father (Winston), and cousin Rosalind Manthei, née Lloyd, aka Lynn. Lynn was disturbed to discover that the original headstone, an elaborate one, had been replaced by a plain headstone matching the majority of other headstones in the cemetery. She called the cemetery offices and was told that a tree had fallen, damaging the original headstone and requiring replacement.[16][17][18]

Research Notes

Birth Date

There is an entry for an Almor Lloyd, son of Samuel and Jane Lloyd, in the Michigan, Births and Christenings Index, 1867-1911 who was born in Sault Ste Marie, Chippewa, Michigan on 29 April 1887. If the referenced record proves to be for Elmer Bruce Lloyd, then it provides a more accurate date for his birth, along with confirmation of his birth place.[19]

1920 Census

In the 1920 US Census, Elmer Bruce Lloyd is incorrectly identified as being his Navy-base roommate's son. (Examination of their respective ages on the Census form shows this to be impossible.) Given his sense of humor, as noted by family members, I first believed it likely that he claimed the relationship as a joke on the census taker, but further examination of the census shows that this census taker identified all roommates at the Pensacola Naval Air Station as being in familial relationships.

Artifacts

At the time this article was first written, a number of artifacts were in the possession of Elmer's son, Winston. Winston has now passed away and the current location of most of those artifacts is unknown. It is possible they were taken by a relative prior to his death, some may be in the possession of Winston's daughter, but others may have been permanently lost.

Sources

Reference Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Lloyd, Winston D., unpublished autobiographical document in MS Word format, written c. 2008. Electronic copy in possession of Pamela D. Lloyd.
  2. Ancestry.com, "U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," database, Ancestry.com Operations Inc., Ancestry.com, (www.ancestry.com/) : accessed 2 May 2017, entry for Elmer Bruce Lloyd; citing United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls. Imaged from Family History Library microfilm.
  3. "Florida, County Marriages, 1830-1957," FamilySearch, entry for Elmer Bruce Lloyd and Inez Herrington, 07 Jun 1922.
  4. Lloyd, Pamela D., direct experience.
  5. Lloyd, Elmer Bruce, "rattle," currently in the possession of Winston D. Lloyd.
  6. Lloyd, Elmer Bruce, "monkey wrench," currently in the possession of Winston D. Lloyd.
  7. Lloyd, Elmer Bruce, "shell casing table lamps," currently in the possession of Winston D. Lloyd.
  8. Lloyd, Elmer Bruce, "propeller plane lamp," currently in the possession of Winston D. Lloyd.
  9. Ancestry.com, "U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962," database, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com/) : accessed 1 May 2017, entry for Elmer Bruce Lloyd (died 19 Jan 1948), Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola, Florida; citing Interment Control Forms, 1928–1962, "Interment Control Forms, A1 2110-B," Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774–1985, Record Group 92. The National Archives at College Park, College Park, Maryland.
  10. Ancestry.com, "U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962," entry for Elmer Bruce Lloyd (d. 19 Jan 1948).
  11. Ancestry.com, "U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962," entry for Elmer Bruce Lloyd (d. 19 Jan 1948).
  12. Told to Pamela D. Lloyd by Joycelin Inez Lloyd.
  13. Told to Pamela D. Lloyd by Joycelin Inez Lloyd.
  14. Ancestry.com, "U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962," entry for Elmer Bruce Lloyd (d. 19 Jan 1948).
  15. Find A Grave. Memorial #923712 for Elmer Bruce Lloyd.
  16. Headstone, Elmer Bruce Lloyd. Barrancas National Cemetery. Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida, USA. Plot: 14, 0, 20. Visited on 9 January 2014.
  17. Manthei, Rosalind. Personal knowledge, as shared on 9 January 2014.
  18. Staff at Barrancas National Cemetery, as reported to me by Rosalind Manthei on 9 January 2014.
  19. Entry for Almor Lloyd. Michigan Births and Christenings, 1775–1995 Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.

Source List

  • 1900 U.S. Census, Population Schedule. Michigan, Chippewa County. Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2004. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/. Subscription database. May 2014. Citing NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 707. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900.
  • 1910 U.S. Census, Population Schedule. Michigan, Chippewa County. Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2006. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/. Subscription database. May 2014. Citing NARA microfilm publication T624, roll T624_641. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910.
  • 1920 U.S. Census, Population Schedule. Florida, Escambia County. Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2010. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/. Subscription database. May 2014. Citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll T625_219. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1920.
  • 1930 U.S. Census, Population Schedule. Florida, Escambia County. Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2010. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/. Subscription database. May 2014. Citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 316. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930.
  • 1935 Florida State Census, Population Schedule. Escambia County. Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2008. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/. Subscription database. May 2014. Citing State Library and Archives of Florida microfilm publication S 5, roll 10. Tallahassee, Florida: State Library and Archives of Florida, n.d.
  • 1940 U.S. Census, Population Schedule. Florida, Escambia County. Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2012. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/. Subscription database. May 2014. Citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll T627_586. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940.
  • 1945 Florida State Census, Population Schedule. Escambia County. Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2012. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/. Subscription database. May 2014. Citing State Library and Archives of Florida microfilm publication S 1371, roll 17. Tallahassee, Florida: State Library and Archives of Florida, n.d.
  • Ancestry.com. "U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962." Database. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/ : 2017.
  • Ancestry.com. "U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918." Database. Ancestry.com Operations Inc. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/: 2005.
  • Ancestry.com. "U.S. World War II Navy Muster Rolls, 1938-1949." Database.

Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com/ : 2004.

  • Border Crossings: From U.S. to Canada, 1908-1935. Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2008. Ancestry.com. www.ancestry.com. Subscription database. May 2014. Citing Library and Archives Canada microfilm publication Border Entries, roll T-5501.
  • Florida, County Marriages, 1830-1957, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FW9Y-46T : accessed 2 May 2017), Elmer Bruce Lloyd and Inez Herrington, 07 Jun 1922; citing Escambia, Florida, United States, State Archive, Tallahassee and clerk of courts, various counties; FHL microfilm 941,007.
  • National Cemetery Administration. "U.S. Veterans Gravesites, ca.1775-2006." Database. Ancestry.com Operations Inc. Ancestry.com www.ancestry.com/ : 2006.

The following sources were reviewed via Ancestry.com. I will be completing the source entry with full details in the near future. Lloyd-391 00:23, 17 May 2014 (EDT)

  • Library and Archives Cards, 1908-1935 Border Entries, Roll: T5499


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Memories: 2

On 18 May 2014 Pamela Lloyd wrote:

On 29 December 2013, while visiting my father, Winston Lloyd, Elmer's youngest son, we found a book among my father's possessions. The book was Freemasonry in the American Revolution. With the book was a note from my dad's mother, Elmer's wife. She wrote: "Winston: This was Lloyd's book, he had where he became a Mason. They are never supposed to be given or read by anyone who is not a Mason or so I understand. —Mom" [in blue ink] There was an addendum in the same handwriting: "Thought you would like to add this to your book collection. There are others here." [in black ink]

Dad commented that his father had a tattoo of a Mason emblem on his arm, but said that he regretted getting the tattoo. According to my dad, the Mason's were quite religious, but his father was "not religious."


On 18 May 2014 Pamela Lloyd wrote:

I have created a profile page at http://www.fold3.com/page/641393211_elmer_bruce_lloyd/ on Fold3 and a military page at http://trees.ancestry.com/view/Military.aspx?tid51274793&pid13174821382&vida9249f24-4a55-44e6-ad7a-d9d991df9f15&mrgIgn1&pt1&pg32768&pgpl=pid on Ancestry.com for Elmer Bruce Lloyd. These pages include photos and document images not yet uploaded to WikiTree.



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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Elmer Bruce by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree: It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with Elmer Bruce:

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Images: 14
Elmer Bruce Lloyd, with one of the planes he worked on
Elmer Bruce Lloyd, with one of the planes he worked on

Christmas 1946 at Brent, Pensacola, Florida
Christmas 1946 at Brent, Pensacola, Florida

Squadron VN3D8, Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida. 6 June 1930. Photograph.
Squadron VN3D8, Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida. 6 June 1930. Photograph.

Roster for Squadron VN3D8
Roster for Squadron VN3D8

P.I. Gunn and E.B. Lloyd
P.I. Gunn and E.B. Lloyd

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