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James Alexander Lowry (1834 - abt. 1905)

Privacy Level: Open (White)
James Alexander Lowry
Born in Greene, Tennessee, United Statesmap
Ancestors ancestors
[sibling(s) unknown]
Husband of — married in Greene, Tennessee, United Statesmap
Husband of — married in Greene, Tennessee, United Statesmap
Descendants descendants
Died about in Tennessee, United Statesmap [uncertain]
Lowry-359 created 23 Jan 2012 | Last modified
This page has been accessed 726 times.

Categories: 4th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Union), United States Civil War.


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Native of Greene, Tennessee

Contents

Biography

James Lowry fought in the US Civil War between the States.
Enlisted: 30 Jan 1863
Mustered out: 2 Aug 1865
Fought for: USA, Private
Regiment(s): Company D, 4th Regiment Tennessee Volunteer Infantry


1880 Occupation: Farmer

Note

Note: Civil War Veteran - Yes Co. D Infantry Tenn 4th Regmt.


Event

Event: Muster In - Civil War, Company D, 4 Eastern Tenn Regiment
Type: Military
Date: 15 JUN 1863
Place: Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee, United States
Event: Muster Out Date - Prisioner of War
Type: Military
Date: 2 AUG 1865
Place: Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee, United States
Note: From various sources including the Official Report by Major Patterson: Oct.12, 1863 (in command of the 4th Tennessee (U.S.) Volunteer Infantry at the time.)
After their defeat at Chickamauga, the Union forces under the command of General William S. Rosecrans retreated to Chattanooga, and were surrounded by Confederate General Braxton Bragg's army, which had been reinforced at Chickamauga with General James Longstreet's force from Lee's army.
Deeming it unwise to attack the Federals, Bragg's force laid seige to Chattanooga, being able to control river and railroad traffic into the city, effectively cutting off the supplies to the nearly surrounded army and civilians.
The only supply route available to Chattanooga was a terrible 60 mile road that ran from the city, steeply winding over the heights of Walden Ridge, through the Sequatchie Valley to Anderson's Crossroads. Known as "the cracker-box line", the trip took from 8 to 20 days, and the mules needed nearly all that they could carry to make the journey, thus greatly limiting the amount of supplies returning to the city.
The 4th Tennessee Infantry was sent from Nashville to join the 5th Iowa Cavalry guarding supplies at McMinnville on Sept.9, 1863. On Sept.26, the 5th Iowa Cavalry pulled out, leaving the 4th Tennessee and a few locals to perform the guard duties.
The 4th consisted of approximately 400 men, 136 of which were put to guarding roads and various buildings in the town. The rest were put in the existing rifle pits around the town.
On October 1st, Confederate Major General Joseph Wheeler led 5,000 cavalrymen under Brigadier Generals William Martin and John Wharton across the Tennessee River to break the "cracker-box" line.
The 2nd of October found Wheeler splitting his command, and while he and Martin attacked Anderson's Crossroads, destroying an 800 wagon caravan, General Wharton moved on McMinnville.
The previous day (October 1st), a group of refugees which included Judge John C. Gant from Cleveland, Tennessee told Major Patterson that a large force of Confederates was approaching, (between 5,000 and 10,000) and plans were made to burn the supply warehouses the following day.
On the following day (October 2nd), several Union Military Officers arrived in the town, and reported no enemy troop activity, and the plans to destroy the supplies were put on hold.
On October 3rd, Lieutenant Farnsworth, with 20 men on horses (requisitioned previously) was sent to patrol the area and locate any enemy, but were not heard from (it was later learned they had been cut off.), and Lieutenant Allen and another 20 men were sent on the same mission.
The town was attacked by General Wharton's Cavalry on that morning, the fighting lasting an hour and a quarter, before a courier under a flag of truce brought a note demanding surrender, which Major Patterson refused, citing the unofficial and incomplete message that was received.
An hour and a quarter later, another message was received, and the terms of surrender were accepted by Major Patterson, and the Officers and men were paroled to their homes.
We do solemnly swear that we will not bear arms against the Confederate States of America, nor in any way give aid and comfort to the United States against the Confederate States, during the existence of the war between the said United States and Confederate States, unless we shall be duly exchanged for other prisoners of war, or until we shall be released by the President of the Confederate States. In consideration of this oath, it is understood that we are free to go wherever we may see fit.
Following the surrender, according to Major Patterson, there occurred "the most brutal outrages on the part of the rebels ever known to any civilized war in America or elsewhere." The Major was shocked as the cavalrymen proceeded to outfit themselves in new clothes from head to foot, taking "boots, watch, pocket-book, money, and even finger-rings, or, in fact, anything that happened to please their fancy". Patterson, observing that General Wheeler had arrived on the scene, appealed to him directly to stop the pillaging. Wheeler only replied that he could not control his men, and that they would do as they pleased. Considering the dire condition of Forrest's men, whom most of these were, and their known reluctance to obey Wheeler's orders, the General probably stated the simple truth.
The surrendered men were held many hours by their captors, and it was late night before they were allowed to begin their trek to their homes.
Due to these events after the surrender, Andrew Johnson, the Military Governor of Tennessee, on October 12, inquired of General W.S. Rosecrans whether the parole was valid or not, and Capt. James A. Garfield, Asst. Adj. General, declared the parole invalid, and the troops, which had progressed only as far as Sparta on their trip home, were ordered to rejoin Major Patterson in Nashville.
Also on October 12, the Board of Inquiry ruled that Major Michael Patterson had acted in his best judgement in surrendering the command at McMinnville, and he was ordered back to command.
On November 17th, the Colors and Standards of the 4th Tennessee Infantry were recaptured from a courier in Northern Georgia, and returned to the unit.
Research done and submitted to
Greene Co Genealogy site by Dennis Michael O'Neill.

Sources


  • "Tennessee State Marriage Index, 1780-2002," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VNDW-4H5 : 4 December 2014), James Lowry and Elizabeth Kerbaugh, 28 Jun 1856; from "Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002," database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 2008); citing p. 14, Greene, Tennessee, United States, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • "Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZWM-35F : 14 July 2015), James Lowry and Elizabeth Kerbaugh, 28 Jun 1856; citing Greene, Tennessee, United States, Marriage, p. 73, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville and county clerk offices from various counties; FHL microfilm 1,148,742.
  • "Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZWM-35K : 14 July 2015), James Lowry and Elizabeth Kerbaugh, 28 Jun 1856; citing Greene, Tennessee, United States, Marriage, p. 73, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville and county clerk offices from various counties; FHL microfilm 1,148,742.
  • "Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZWM-35J : 14 July 2015), James Lowry and Elizabeth Kerbaugh, 28 Jun 1856; citing Greene, Tennessee, United States, Marriage, p. , Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville and county clerk offices from various counties; FHL microfilm 1,148,742.
  • "United States Census, 1870," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MDD9-WS1 : 17 October 2014), James Lowery, Tennessee, United States; citing p. 12, family 82, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 553,030.
  • "Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZW9-LZC : 14 July 2015), James A Lowry and Nancy C Miller, 07 May 1878; citing Greene, Tennessee, United States, Marriage, p. , Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville and county clerk offices from various counties; FHL microfilm 1,148,759.
  • "Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZW9-LZ3 : 14 July 2015), James A Lowry and Nancy C Miller, 12 May 1878; citing Greene, Tennessee, United States, Marriage, p. 2288, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville and county clerk offices from various counties; FHL microfilm 1,148,759.
  • "Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1950," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XDQ7-38V : 8 December 2014), James A. Lowry and Nancy C. Miller, 12 May 1878; citing Greene,Tennessee, reference ; FHL microfilm 944,387.
  • "United States Census, 1880," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MD7H-RW2 : 24 December 2015), James Lowrey, District 9, Greene, Tennessee, United States; citing enumeration district ED 45, sheet 42A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 1258; FHL microfilm 1,255,258.
  • "United States Census of Union Veterans and Widows of the Civil War, 1890," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K8S3-4B2 : 14 November 2014), James A Lowery, 1890; citing NARA microfilm publication M123 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 338,254.
  • "United States Census, 1900," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MS8K-JB3 : 22 January 2015), James Lowery, Civil Districts 2, 24, Greene, Tennessee, United States; citing sheet 4B, family 66, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,241,573.


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It may be possible to confirm family relationships with James by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. However, there are no known yDNA or mtDNA test-takers in his direct paternal or maternal line. It is likely that these autosomal DNA test-takers will share DNA with James:

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On 4 Apr 2015 at 22:46 GMT Liz (Noland) Shifflett wrote:

Hi! The nonmigrating ancestor template was edited (at the source/template level) to remove "Native" ... because of the privacy level, I can't add "Native" to the text of the template used on this profile. Just add "Native" after location= from the Edit tab. Thanks!



James is 22 degrees from AJ Jacobs, 21 degrees from Jeanie Roberts, 18 degrees from Myles Standish and 22 degrees from Queen Elizabeth II Windsor on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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