Malcolm II (MacAlpin) of Scotland

Mael Coluim (MacAlpin) of Scotland (0954 - abt. 1034)

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Mael Coluim (Malcolm II) "King of Scotland" of Scotland formerly MacAlpin aka mac Cinaeda, Mackenneth
Born in Scotlandmap
Ancestors ancestors
Brother of and [half]
Husband of — married [location unknown]
Descendants descendants
Died about in Glamis Castle, Angus, Scotlandmap
Profile last modified | Created 11 Dec 2012 | Last significant change: 14 Nov 2018
16:45: Michael Thomas edited the Biography for Malcolm II (MacAlpin) of Scotland. [Thank Michael for this]
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Categories: House of Alpin.

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Malcolm II (MacAlpin) of Scotland was a member of aristocracy in the British Isles.
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Contents

Vitals

Malcolm II (MacKenneth)[1]
Born c 954.[1]
Died 25 Nov 1034 (murdered), aged 80, at Glamis Castle.[1]
Buried: Iona.[1]
Married: c980 (date and spouse's name unknown)[1]
2 or 3 daughters.[1]

His mother was possibly a daughter of a Uí Dúnlainge king of Leinster (per Oxford DNB).

MALCOLM II (Mackenneth), King of Scotland, son of Kenneth II, succeeded in 1005 to the throne by defeating and killing Kenneth III, son of Duff, at Monzievaird, Perthshire. He commenced his reign by a raid on Northumbria and the siege of Durham, before whose gates he was repulsed with great slaughter by Uchtred, son of the Ealdorman Waltheof, in 1006. Uchtred was rewarded for this victory by receiving a grant of the two Northumberland earldoms, Bernicia and Deira, from Ethelred, king of Wessex, who gave him as his third wife his daughter Ælgifu (Freeman, _Norman Conquest_, i. 358). The whole south-eastern border of Scotland being thus united under this powerful earl, Malcolm turned his attention to the north of Scotland. He allied himself to Sigurd, jarl of Orkney, in 1008, by giving him his daughter in marriage, and the son of this marriage, Thorfinn, a boy of five, on the death of his father at Clontarf, 1014, was made Earl of Caithness and Sutherland, while his elder brother succeeded to the Orkney, Shetland, and other islands held by the Norse jarls. In 1018 Eadulf Cudel, the brother of Uchtred (slain by Canute), who retained the district north of the Tees, in spite of Canute's grant of the Northumbrian earldom to Eric, another Dane, was defeated at Carham on the Tweed, two miles above Coldstream, by the united forces of Malcolm and Eugenius, or Owen the Bald, king of the Strathclyde Britons. The great victory, which had been presaged by a comet, led to the cession of Lothian to the Scottish kingdom (Simeon of Durham, 'Tract on the Northumbrian Earls,' _Decem Scriptores_, x. 81)[2], although John of Wallingford (p. 544) and Roger of Wendover (i. 416) assert there was an earlier grant by Eadgar, king of Wessex, to Kenneth circa 968, a view which Freeman, in his 'Norman Conquest,' adopts in a modified form, while admitting the effect of the victory of Carham, and acknowledging that Simeon of Durham is the best English authority on the point. His argument, on 'The Cession of Lothian' (_Norman Conquest_, i. 610), against Mr. E. W. Robertson (_Scotland under her Early Kings_, ii. 386), is partial, and although he stated that the subject was suited 'for a monograph, and if I do not find any opportunity for a single combat with Mr. Robertson,' he never found the opportunity; and 'his hope that some other champion of the rights of Edward and Athelstane may be forthcoming' has not been realised, for more recent English writers have not supported his views (see Green's _History_, i. 102; art. Eedgar).

The cession of Lothian, whatever its date, was made on the condition that the men of Lothian should retain their customs and laws, with the important result that the Scottish south-eastern lowlands became the centre from which Anglo-Saxon and Norman civilisation gradually permeated Scotland. About the same time, on the death of Owen, the king of Strathclyde, that district which consisted of Cumbria north of the Solway became an appanage of the Scottish kingdom under Duncan, grandson of Malcolm, by the marriage of one of his daughters with Crinan, the lay abbot of Dunkeld, while modern Cumberland, south of the Solway, fell into the hands of the English kings. The southern boundary of future Scotland was for the first time indicated by these two acquisitions, and, in spite of attempts to restrict or extend it, the Tweed and the, Solway were marked out as the limits, between the, kingdoms.

The reign of Malcolm is a blank for the next twelve years, but in 1031 Canute, who had conquered England, after a visit to Rome made a raid on Scotland, and, accordingo the 'Saxon Chronicle,' Malcolm 'bowed to his power, and became his man, retaining his allegiance for a very short time.' One of the poems of Sighvat, the Norse contemporary poet, perhaps refers to the same victory in the lines:
The foremost princes, north of Fife, have bowed
Their heads to Cnut, to buy peace from him.
_Corpus Poet. Boreale_, i. 133.

Macbeth and Jehmarc, two sub-kings who submitted to Canute at the same time, are conjectured by Skene to have been Macbeth, son of Finlay, mormær of Moray, afterwards king of Scotland, and another mormær of uncertain name and district, perhaps of Argyll. On 25 Nov. 1031 Malcolm died, for the statement of Fordoun and Wyntoun that he was killed at Glamis is not supported by the earlier authorities. He is called by Marianus Scotus, the monk of Cologne, who was born during his reign, Rex Scotiæ the first instance of the territorial title of king of Scotland, and by Tighernac, the Irish annalist 'king of Alban, and head of the nobility of the west of Europe.' A later chronicle 1165 mentions his benefactions to the church; but the foundation of the see of Mortlach, afterwards transferred to Aberdeen, ascribed to him by Fordoun, can scarcely be historical, and probably belongs to the reign of Malcolm III. The laws attributed to him, by which all Scotland was transformed into a feudal monarchy at a council held at Scone, are apocryphal, for feudalism proper did not penetrate Scotland till the time of Malcolm Canmore and his sons. The year before his own death he had slain a possible competitor for the crown, who is described by the 'Ulster Annals' as 'the son of Boete, the son of Kenneth, possibly his cousin or nephew' (Skene, p. 399), and he was succeeded by his grandson, Duncan I, son of his daughter Bethoc by Crinan, lay abbot of Dunkeld, and father of Malcolm III. With Malcolm ended the male line of Kenneth Macalpine.

[Chron. of Picts and Scots, Anglo-Saxon Chron., The Annals of Tigernach, Heimskringla, vii., chap. ii., Simeon of Durham, John of Wallingford's Chronicles, and Marianus Scotus are the authorities on which Skene, Celtic Scotland, and Robertson, Scotland under her Early Kings, have constructed the history of this reign. Freeman's Norman Conquest, vol. i.; Robertson's Scotland under her Early Kings; Skene's Celtic Scotland, vol. i.] Æ. M.* [Ref: DNB, Editor, Sidney Lee, MacMillan Co, London & Smith, Elder & Co., NY, 1908, vol. xii, pp. 843-4]

Titles

Sub-king of Cumbria and Strathclyde, 990-5, 997-1105[1]
King of Scotland, 1005-34.[1]

Alias

Mael Coluim mac Cinaeda[3]
Forranach the Destroyer
King Malcolm II of Alba, the destroyer[4]
Malcolm Mackenneth Duxia II 16th High King of Scotland "The Destroyer"[5]
Melkolf[6]

Death

T1034.1
Maolcoluim son of Cinaedh, king of Scotland, glory of the whole west of Europe, died.[7]

Links

WikiTree: Early rulers: Malcolm II to Duncan
Wikipedia:Malcolm II of Scotland
The Peerage
Foundation for Medieval Genealogy
The official Website of British Monarchy

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Ashley, Mike (2008). A Brief History of British Kings and Queens. p. 103. Philadelphia, PA: Running Press Book Publishers. Print.
  2. Historiae Anglicanae scriptores decem, retrieved 2014-06-02, amb
  3. The Annals of Tigernach, Author: Unknown, retrieved 2014-06-02, amb
  4. The Peerage for Malcolm II, King of Alba
  5. John of Fordun's Chronicle of the Scottish nation. Translated from the Latin text by Felix J. H. Skene. Ed. by William F. Skene. retrieved 2014-06-02, amb
  6. The Celtic magazine, p. 479, conducted by A. Mackenzie and A. MacGregor, edited by Alexander Mackenzie. retrieved 2014-06-02
  7. The Annals of Tigernach, Author: Unknown

Acknowledgements

This page has been edited according to Style Standards adopted January 2014. Descriptions of imported gedcoms for this profile are under the Changes tab.


Biography

•ID: I10894 •Name: Malcolm ALPINE 1 •Sex: M •Birth: ABT 965 in Scotland •Death: 1034 in Scotland •Reference Number: 10894 •Note: II "King of Albany" 29th great-grandfather of Bertha Alice (Boyce) Lakey; Laura Eleanor (Boyce) Philp 29th & 33rd great-grandfather of Frances Emily (Hogan) Pipe; Eulelia Mable (Hogan) Bentrop 35th great-grandfather of Richard Scott Lakey; Christina Ann (Lakey) Dick; John Brian Pipe; Christian Matthew Pipe

Kenneth's descendant, Malcolm II, conquered Lothian in 1018; Strathclyde joined his kingdom a year later. Malcolm was thus a king of a nation whose territory was much the same as it is today. For good or ill, Malcolm also began the process of introducing English ways into Scotland 1031 Malcolm swears allegiance to Canute of England. On the death of Malcolm II the House of Alpine failed in the male line. Malcolm had two daughters, (Bethoc & Donada) and the only surviving descendant of his cousin and immidiate predicessor Kenneth III was a grand-daughter.

Mael Coluim Mac Cinaeda, King of the Scots, nick named "The Aggrissor" or "The Destroyer" raided into northern England and was defeated. But later he defeated a Northumbrian army at Carham on the Tweed, which gave to Scotland the Lothian north of the Tweed and at the death of King Ywain of Strathclyde allowed him to absorb Strathclyde also, forming present day Scotland. Malcolm II was father of Princess Bethoc (or Beatrice) who married Crinan the Thane about 1005. Kenneth II was father of Malcolm II, King of Albany who died of wounds in 1034




Father: Kenneth ALPINE b: ABT 938 in Scotland

Marriage 1 Spouse UnknownChildren1.Has Children Bethoc b: ABT 984 in Atholl, Perthshire, Scotland 2.Has Children Donada ALPINE b: ABT 990 3.Has No Children Olith b: ABT 992 4.Has No Children Donada b: ABT 994

Sources: 1.Title: Bloodline of The Holy Grail by Lawrence Gardner




Index

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Ashley, Mike (2008). A Brief History of British Kings and Queens. p. 103. Philadelphia, PA: Running Press Book Publishers. Print.
  2. Historiae Anglicanae scriptores decem, retrieved 2014-06-02, amb
  3. The Annals of Tigernach, Author: Unknown, retrieved 2014-06-02, amb
  4. The Peerage for Malcolm II, King of Alba
  5. John of Fordun's Chronicle of the Scottish nation. Translated from the Latin text by Felix J. H. Skene. Ed. by William F. Skene. retrieved 2014-06-02, amb
  6. The Celtic magazine, p. 479, conducted by A. Mackenzie and A. MacGregor, edited by Alexander Mackenzie. retrieved 2014-06-02
  7. The Annals of Tigernach, Author: Unknown


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DNA Connections
It may be possible to confirm family relationships with Malcolm II by comparing test results with other carriers of his Y-chromosome or his mother's mitochondrial DNA. Y-chromosome DNA test-takers in his direct paternal line on WikiTree:

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Images: 3
Malcolm Of Scotland
Malcolm Of Scotland

Malcolm II of Scotland Image 2
Malcolm II of Scotland Image 2

Malcolm II (MacAlpin) of Scotland
Malcolm II (MacAlpin) of Scotland

Collaboration

On 18 Sep 2018 at 07:25 GMT Valerie Willis wrote:

Thought this looked interesting - Annuls of Ulster : U1118.5 "Maria, daughter of Mael Coluim, daughter of the king of Scotland and wife to the king of England, died."

On 24 Sep 2015 at 03:49 GMT Marty (Lenover) Acks wrote:

Meic Cináeda-3 and MacAlpin-34 appear to represent the same person because: Same name and parents

On 26 Apr 2013 at 18:20 GMT Vic Watt wrote:

Eugene, With no cites, I would disconnect the kids from all mothers and put notes in the kids' profiles that the mother is unknown. My first inclination was to disconnect all wives too, but it might be better just to leave them.



Malcolm II is 35 degrees from Rosa Parks, 33 degrees from Anne Tichborne and 24 degrees from Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on our single family tree. Login to find your connection.

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